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Why do I hate running?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I’ve added running to my Rollerblading, Elliptical training & Circuit training routine. I seem to be hurting my overall fitness improvements.



I was rollerblading 3X a week for 30 miles total, and elliptical training for 15 to 35 minutes before my 45 minutes of circuit training on alternate days. Everything was great. No pain or injury. I lost 30 Lbs in 6 months, and made great progress in fitness.



I started running a mile before my stretching & circuit training and now I have soreness and pain that is holding up my other activities. I now get pain running down my right side from my core through my buttocks to my knee. Sitting and lying is painful for 24 hours after running. I am 48 years old.



Why is this happening?!?



Barrettscv
post #2 of 21
A lot of possible reasons...of all the activities that you listed, running is the only 'impact' inducing training. Thus it will stress your joints a lot more than all the others combined. If you are overweight, even more so.

One important point that is often overlooked is shoe choice - worn out or improperly fitted shoes are the single most common cause of running injuries. If your foot rolls to the inside on impact, for example, you'll need a stability shoe (or possibly motion control). If you've got over ~400-500 miles (including walking, running, etc) on your shoes now, time for a new pair.

You don't provide many specifics about your injury. If it's strictly muscle soreness, I wouldn't worry too much as that is expected when starting a new activity and will likely pass with time. If it's a specific pain in a joint, or one particular area then that might be something worth worrying about...
post #3 of 21
Sounds like the sciatic nerve inflamation I get. My solution is bike ski hike climb rollerblade snowshoe ....anything but run.
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
I use Adidas Supernova's that are new. I am 220 Lbs, about 30 Lbs overweight. The pain is more annoying than serious, but it reduces activity. My Father had problems with Sciatic nerve pain. I will look into it.

Thanks

Barrettscv
post #5 of 21
As I've said before, I've never been able to stick with a running program. Too many of the same problems that you are experiencing, although I will jog once in a while in the winter when it's too cold to do anything else and I get bored with my Nordic Track. Have just found that as you mentioned, it seems to create more problems than it solves. I have a couple of buddies in their 50's that I bike with that have ruined their joints from running. Speaking of biking, Harald Harb has a new and very interesting article up on his website that promotes the benefits of cycling in regards to skiing that is well worth reading. Go to Harbskisystems.com, click on the Browse heading in the lower right hand side, then go to the News heading on the left side, and click on Harald's current article.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by yelloboy
One important point that is often overlooked is shoe choice - worn out or improperly fitted shoes are the single most common cause of running injuries. If your foot rolls to the inside on impact, for example, you'll need a stability shoe (or possibly motion control). If you've got over ~400-500 miles (including walking, running, etc) on your shoes now, time for a new pair.
Boy is this true. Not as dramatic as bootfitting for skis, but both type of shoe and brand can make a huge difference. Just because a shoe works for someone else - even if they are they same weight as you are - does not make it the right shoe for you. If I get into the "wrong" shoe, I'll end up with anything from sore knees to lower back pain to aching feet. Most big cities have one or more "serious" running shops that are good at putting people into the "right" shoes. If you are interested in continuing to run, you may want to find one.

I'm lucky to get over 200 miles on a pair of shoes. Even reasonably high end ones. I'm pretty heavy and the way my feet hit I just crush the heck out of my shoes. When my knees and back start getting twinges, time to dump them (the shoes) - even though the outsoles are usually almost pristine.
post #7 of 21
barrettscv, if it isn't one of the above, do you run on pavement, dirt, outdoor track, indoor (padded?) track, treadmill?
post #8 of 21
Quote:
I am 48 years old.

Why is this happening?!?
You are 48 years old.
post #9 of 21
Do you get the pain when stretching your hipflexors and/or quad?

After a few knee surgeries I have sporadic femoral nerve inflammation that feels like burning from my lower back, through my hip, and down my quad.

The only way I have found to get rid of this is stretching, exercise, massage therapy, and surprisingly running.

I'm sure my issue is different then yours. Either way you should see a doctor.
post #10 of 21
In running, a host of problems, knee, back, thigh, hip, etc, often trace their cause back to the foot and ankle, allignment and support.

Shoes can make a world of difference. Brand, model, size all vary in how well they work for various foot & body types, much like ski boots. As spendrift said, it's not quite as dramatic as ski boots, but it's pretty dramatic. When I ran competitively most of my teammates swore by asics, I tried them once - got shin splints like nobody's business. Nike's tended to hurt my knees. I ended up generally in reebok - but I always hated them because I would only get a little more than 300 miles out of them (and when you're putting in 10 to 15 day, replacing your shoes once a month is both annoying and costly). So, shoes are a place to start.

The next one is going to sound very familiar: custom footbeds! Try off the shelf *running* footbeds first, and see if they help. With any luck, that's all you'll need. If not, a custom orthotic made by a sports orientated podiatrist will help more than many people realize...

Overall though, the place to start, just like with ski boots, is in a good shop with a good sales guy. Don't go to the big box sporting goods stores, find the shop in your area that caters specifically to runners, and go talk to them.

J
post #11 of 21
Just to repeat the message---shoes make all the difference for running. Most foot, ankle, knee, hip, and shin problems result from the wrong shoes or worn out shoes.

As people on this thread have already said, go to a specialty running store and get yourself fitted for a couple pairs of good running shoes.
post #12 of 21
I loved running, 25 years ago. (Now 49) But even then I could not run in cold weather, no matter how much I warmed up. Now, I find bicycling the way for me. Reduce that impact on the joints! I just bought a Schwinn Airdyne for bad weather/winter use. It provides a good workout.
post #13 of 21

Go Back to Your Earlier Program

Why hurt yourself? Don't run. You don't need to run for aerobic fitness. Between the cycling, ellipsing and blading you've got a great thing going, esp. with the circuit training, which, with stretching, is the best overall approach to fitness. Go back to your earlier program.
post #14 of 21
Running is a much more intense activity than the other activities mentioned. This is one of the reasons I like to run -- you get the most exercise for the time spent. That said, it's really easy to overdo it, especially if you are just starting out.

I've had a lot of problems with leg/joint pain due to stress from running, mostly due to an incorrect approach to training. Here are some things that have helped to to improve while minimizing discomfort:

1. Start slow. If you are in pain after running, the most obvious thing is to reduce you speed and or distance, and gradually increase as you get stronger. Jogging is still very worthwhile.
2. Never, never, never run on concrete or asphalt. Grass, dirt, rubberized tracks, and loose gravel are much softer. Even _thinking_ about running on the sidewalk make my shins hurt.
3. Try to improve your technique, to produce less of a jarring impact on each stride. Run like you are trying to sneak up on someone (i.e. not making a lot of noise).

Once you are capable of running for 30-60 minutes at a time, you will start to experience the runner's high, and at that point you'll hate _not_ running!
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cornice77
1. Start slow. If you are in pain after running, the most obvious thing is to reduce you speed and or distance, and gradually increase as you get stronger. Jogging is still very worthwhile.
2. Never, never, never run on concrete or asphalt. Grass, dirt, rubberized tracks, and loose gravel are much softer. Even _thinking_ about running on the sidewalk make my shins hurt.
3. Try to improve your technique, to produce less of a jarring impact on each stride. Run like you are trying to sneak up on someone (i.e. not making a lot of noise).

Once you are capable of running for 30-60 minutes at a time, you will start to experience the runner's high, and at that point you'll hate _not_ running!
Good advise,



I have no problems on grass. I was a USSF soccer referee and could walk-run six 90 minute games a day for multiple days at tournaments.



My problem is concrete. I live in the city of Chicago and cannot find a soft surface. I will stick to the elliptical until then.



Best regards,



Michael Barrett
post #16 of 21
This is good advice, but I would disagree about not getting the intensity from the other activities. And it also depends on whether you are targeting general fitness, aerobic conditoning or anerobic conditioning. That said, a lot of top sprinters, who carry high training loads, train much of the year on grass to avoid injuries. You've got to check the grass carefuly, though, for bumps and holes. My son was sprinting on grass two years ago and nearly broke his ankle stepping on a small ant hill hidden by the grass. There is also a detailed look at running technique you can find on Google under "Pose Running." It emphasizes alignment, running on the the mid- and fore-foot, but requires a lot of pre-conditioning to do properly. This guy Romanov has a DVD on it. I'd stick with what you were doing before. I'd be interested to know how your new found fitness affects yor skiing.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv
My problem is concrete. I live in the city of Chicago and cannot find a soft surface. I will stick to the elliptical until then.
Where in Chicago are you? There are softer running surfaces available if you know where to look.
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
Sounds like the sciatic nerve inflamation I get. My solution is bike ski hike climb rollerblade snowshoe ....anything but run.
The newfydog is probably right. You might think about not running for now and try lower impact exercise like NF mentioned and work on core strengthening (strengthen the muscles that hold together your lower back). Get a recommendation for a good Orthopedist (preferably someone with a sports medicine practice) and have him/her narrow down the possibilities of what's bothering you. I feel your pain!
post #19 of 21
your 48 years old and thats the only pain you have? sounds like your in pretty good shape.
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well, I went from mostly sedentary living to 3 weekly workouts at the “Y” plus 20 to 30 miles of rollerblading and lost 33 Lbs since New Year. The basic program, as recommended at the “Y” was a great start, and now I’m looking to take it to the next level.

My plan is to avoid running until I hit my ideal weight sometime next year. I now divide my hour of circuit training with three 15 minute interval sessions on the elliptical. This has been working well since September.

Thanks for all the advice & encouragement!

Michael
post #21 of 21
What you have done is fabulous. You should get a medal or something. It's not easy to do this with all the junk and fast foods that are everywhere. Our family doctor told us the troupble with all that bad stuff is that it tastes so good.

The one great thing about what you've done is tone your muscles and develop a sound aerobic/cardiovascular fitness base. This is, for sure, going to add quality and years to your life, plus really help your skiing. Btw, the same shoe coesn't fit everyone. I know runners who really can't do strength training, but they are very aerobically fit. They aren't much help on moving day with heavy furniture. Not everyone can do everything. My point is go with works and doesn't hurt you.
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