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used equipment for my kids

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
After reading through some postings, I got some questions I am sure many of you can answer.

I got my oldest three children into skiing two years ago. There ages are now 8, 10, and 11. We rented equipment over these two years, and now I am thinking of buying some used skis for this coming season. Generally, we ski in northeastern US (where we live), but we will travel to the west next year.

So, here we go.

1. Used Rental Gear - Ebay has quite a lot of used gear that come from rental shops. How much life is left in this equipment? Any opinions are welcome.

2. Boots - My experience on the slopes tells me not to sacrifice with this purchase, and not to buy online. My plan is to simply go to a store and have the kids find the most comfortable boot and buy them. Any thoughts?

3. Adjusting Bindings - Since, I hope to recycle these skis from one kid to another, i am unsure as to how difficult it is to redrill when moving the bindings, or whether or not there are bindings that are adjustable like the ones you see in a rental shop. Any help is appreciated.

4. Ebay - Any negative thoughts on used skiis from Ebay or is it an inexpensive option that is solid for the non-technical skiier?

Thanks.

Eugene
post #2 of 21
I wouldn't consider buying used rental gear. People don't care what they do with rentals. I was in the military and we had a saying: "What's the difference between a rental car and a Humvee? There's some places you wouldn't drive a Humvee: ." So don't buy used rental cars. The same goes for used rental skis.

You can find closeouts on last year's or the previous year's gear at many sites on eBay. This is probably the best bet. If you want to get some data on older skis, you can't do better than Peter Keelty's webiste, www.techsupportforskiers.com It will cost you $19 to join, but it's the best money you can spend if you're looking to get some deals on eBay and are not a total gearhead.

Boots are tough. Boots that might feel comfortable in the ski shop may not work for the kids on the slopes. Like everyone else on this site says, go to a real ski shop, find an experienced bootfitter, and let him/her guide you.

Rental bindings are heavier. It's no big deal to redrill a couple of times. If you get the skis and bindings from a decent ski shop, they'll probably do at least one remount for free.

Where are you going out west? My kids absolutely love Copper and if you've read any of my previous posts, you'll note that I do to. Good luck.
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 

thanks

bjohansson,

Thanks for the thoughts on rental equipment. I think I will eliminate rentals from consideration.

As far as boots go, when I am in a ski shop, I am assuming that I will be able to tell whether or not the salesperson truly knows what they are talking about. I live four hours away from a serious slope, and would assume local ski stores have employees who are not as versed in the equipment as those near mountain resorts. So, when you say, 'real' ski shop, are you implying only those shops that are near the vicinity of the slopes where the purchasing traffic is heavy?

It is good to hear that redrilling bindings is not a big issue. Knowing this is really shaping how I will probably proceed with purchasing.

Lastly, thanks for the recommendation on Copper Mountain. As far as going out west, I am uncommitted to a particular resort. Living here in the Northeast, we have our share of icy conditions. Since skiing is expensive no matter where you do it, it just makes sense to take my family out west where the conditions are a bit more predictable.

Thanks again.
post #4 of 21
Eugene,

I would consider new skis & bindings for the kids from eBay, however I would go to a bootfitter for the boots. Boots will influence the quality of the time on the slopes more than skis; get good quality, correctly fitting boots. Jr. Racing boots are a good value for pre-teen kids. Review this link for more general info http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=28745

Also see http://www.bootfitters.com/custom_boot_fit_tips.htm for boot fitting tips.

Tell us more about your kids; height, weight; skill level, what slopes & runs do they like the most, other sports played.

I have 2 pair of new, never seen snow, skis listed on the ski swap forum now. One is with bindings for $179, another is without bindings for $139. See: http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=29200

Hope that helps

Barrettscv
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

more info

Barrettscv,

My oldest daughter is around 4' 10" and 100 lbs.

My son is 4' 6" and 70 lbs.

My youngest daughter is 4' 0" and 60 lbs.

This will be their third season for skiing, but they have not logged many hours on the slopes as of yet. We only go about 4X / year.

All of the kids are pretty athletic, and love bouncing around in a terrain park. Pretty much, though, they ski novice slopes with an occassional intermediate trail.

Eugene
post #6 of 21
Unless you are at a ski area or ski shop where you can actually see the "former rental" ski to check it out, I would NOT buy it. Former rentals are retired for a couple reasons, 1. They are worn out and could be dangerous. 2. The area replaces so many pair each year. 3. The area is changing their entire stock. There is no way to tell which ski you are getting off of eBay, especially when the dealer shows a picture that is a "representative sample" of the ski you will receive.

On the other hand, you can pick up some good used skis (rental and other), or brand new old stock skis at ski swaps and sometimes at the ski shows.

You said you are in the northeast, but didn't specify. I too am in the northeast, in the area of Worcester, MA. Wachusett Mountain has a big ski swap and sale on Columbus Day weekend. Crotched Mountain is having a Ski swap and sale Saturday & Sunday,Sept. 24th & 25th -- 2 days only, 9AM - 4PM, Rain or Shine. Spags usually has a ski event in late November or early December (we were able to get brand new rental skis with bindings there - from Nashoba Valley when they changed their entire stock- last year. ) Pine Ridge usually has a ski swap too. Look around, there are most likely a lot more swaps. Don't rule out ski shops too, Sports loft has some good deals on new stuff and Strands sometimes does too.

Strand's bootfitters are pretty well known too.
post #7 of 21
I've seen too many kids walking across the gravel area on rental skis, that said, my kids first skis were "high end" rental skis from a shop in town that recycled the "fleet" every other season.

Rental boots ... wanna buy a smelly mess? Those rental boots have had so many strange and funky feet, sopping from the lodge floors that I'd autoclave them before putting them on.

This time of year there are swap and tent sales all over.

Big question is how much time will the kids be spending on snow?
post #8 of 21
In the summer the ski shops put the mountain bikes upstairs and the ski stuff in the basement at half, sometimes 70% off. That's when I get the kids gear- also we have progressive daughters, so the youngest gets the hand-me-downs (that won't last forever).Kids stuff goes first at a swap, so get there early even if it means a line. I got a pair of adjustable bindings and I don't think the weight's worth it, though my five year old never complained. The idea is to limit fatigue=longer slope time. Anyway, there's a bit of travel in them as is and the little ones jump length every other year.
Some ski shops in Utah have a season rental program where you can pay once, last I looked into it , less than 150$, and every year change up to new gear for a period of years. Only makes sense if you get in early and get the pick of the skis. Other shops, buy once and trade in each year at quite a generous cut. I've got some tiny new head JOJO's to mount with big red snakes on them.What fun.
post #9 of 21
Back when my daughter was pre-race, I always rented seasonally. For the most part, this was NEW equipment that I arranged for in October. It was far far cheaper than renting daily and like I said, it was new. That shop used the seasonal rentals the next year for daily rentals. Of course, your selection is limited, but if you are only skiing four times a year, it probably makes little difference to these kids what they are renting.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by eugene
Barrettscv,

My oldest daughter is around 4' 10" and 100 lbs.

My son is 4' 6" and 70 lbs.

My youngest daughter is 4' 0" and 60 lbs.
I would consider good quality Jr. racing boots for the oldest daughter for the next 2 years, these will be handed down to the younger daughter at that point. Once your girls are 12 or 13, thier feet will be done growing and they can get a pair of appropriate female specific adult boots.


Here is a list of Jr. Skis to consider http://www.skimag.com/skimag/gear/article/0,12795,335267,00.html

Look for these at ski swaps and on eBay.

Also see the articles listed here for more Jr gear

http://www.skimag.com/skimag/search/1,13390,,00.html

You might look for a close out deal on low cost boots for the younger kids. Fit will be more important than performance, at this age. Your son will grow quickly; it will be difficult to get more than a year from one boot size. Boy’s feet stop growing at ages 13 or 14. My son went from size 8 to 12 in 3 years.

If you can find a low-cost annual rental agreement on new Jr gear for the younger kids, that may be your best bet. However, your oldest daughter should buy her own gear; this gear can be handed down in 2 years, making buying economical.

Hope that helps

Barrettscv
post #11 of 21

Oh really?

Quote:
Once your girls are 12 or 13, thier feet will be done growing and they can get a pair of appropriate female specific adult boots.
My feet grew two whole sizes from the time I was 13 to the time I graduated from College. I wore a size 7 1/2 in 8th grade and am now a 9 1/2 or 10. My neice is headed the same way.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachskiljp
My feet grew two whole sizes from the time I was 13 to the time I graduated from College. I wore a size 7 1/2 in 8th grade and am now a 9 1/2 or 10. My neice is headed the same way.
I had a different experience with my 2 daughters. Regardless, the oldest child should get appropriate new boots that are handed down in 2 years to the younger daughter. This gives the investment 4 years of use, and allows dad to buy high quality gear, an improvement on renting.

Barrettscv
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 

great responses

Wow. Thanks for all the great feedback. I have been looking online for about two weeks, and this one posting has given me more direction than I even hoped.

In regards to where in the Northeast I live, it is Rhode Island. I really think I will make it to the Wachuset Ski Swap Columbus Day weekend.

I had no idea ski shops offer season long rentals. That sounds like an option worth considering. It also might be a good way for me to review different equipment, for after reading these replies, I can easily see I have a lot to learn.

Thanks again for all the feedback.

Eugene
post #14 of 21
I found new Jr Skis for $99. See http://www.cupolosports.com/20dytespskip.html

Also see http://www.cupolosports.com/dynolaskibip.html for your oldest daughter.

Ask this Canadian seller to ship with duty fees prepaid to avoid unpleasant surprises; tell him you are a Epic ski - Barking Bear member, and they might pay all charges at no cost.

Barrettscv
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 

size and shape

Thanks for the links. Both skis look quite good. The link to the Jr. skis offer 110 and 130 cm skis. http://www.cupolosports.com/20dytespskip.html. Is this an appropriate match for:

Boy - 10 Years Old - 4' 6" - 70 lbs - 130 cm

Girl - 10 Years Old - 4' 0" - 60 lbs - 110 cm

?

The price is quite good. Also, can anyone give me a quick primer (or where to find one) regarding the sidecut and radius specifications. I don't know how to evaluate these numbers.

At first glance, the ski located at the link - http://www.cupolosports.com/dynolaskibip.html - looks more advanced than my oldest daughter would probably be comfortable with. She is 12 years old, and out of the three that will be skiing, is the most conservative skier.

Any further advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks.

Eugene
post #16 of 21
You can put both on a Dynastar Jr in a 130cm size and be fine for 2 years. My kids used adult 150cm Rossi Cut skis (102-64-93) at that age/size and they had little problems carving turns from the start. The Dynastar is a 98-64-85 sidecut. this provides good carving ability for a preteen skier. I was also able to resell this kind of gear at a swap and recover all my costs. Kids gear resells easily.

I can't find much data on the Nova. It is intended for light adult female skiers. It should be very forgiving; OK for a skier just learning basic skills. Also, the skis will give her more confidence.

Barrettscv
post #17 of 21
Eugene

Here is a Jr Racing ski for your older daughter. This is the Dynastar Omiglass 64 team, includes bindings for $99:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5242664131&fromMakeTra ck=true

Dynastar Team Course 64
Dimensions: 103-64-88
Size: 138-178
Price: $425
The 64 shines as a GS carving machine. It's easy to roll on edge for long, sweeping turns, and its construction provides a stable, solid ride. Testers can bend it for quick, short turns, but that takes work.
"Grippy and fun. Perfect for racers who love to carve and go fast." -Tyler
"Any radius, any speed. Could star in a movie: Mission: Possible. -David


This is the K2 Team SL, 136cm $99.00

http://cgi.ebay.com/K2-Mach-SL-Team-Skis-136cm-NEW_W0QQitemZ5242577602QQcategoryZ21244QQrdZ1QQcmd ZViewItem

I've used this seller with good results.

My daughter uses the adult K2 Mach SL and finds it easy to use but very high performing.

Here is a review from Ski Mag:

K2 MACH
SL TEAM
120-140 cm, $150
Performance Factor 5
Fun Factor 5
Asked what this ski did worst, David responded, "nothing." The Patriot proved to be both fast and smooth in the gates, as well as easy to control and versatile all over the mountain. The testers thought it best suited to an advanced skier or better-someone who would appreciate its balanced feel and "need for speed." As Taylor said, "It does everything well, effortlessly. This ski improved my abilities."


Another Atomic Jr race. This one is easier than the GS:9 J

http://cgi.ebay.com/new-ATOMIC-SL-9-SKIS-140-SLALOM-RACE-2005-JR-KIDS-SL9_W0QQitemZ5243370426QQcategoryZ58362QQrdZ1QQcmd ZViewItem

Atomic SL:11 J
Dimensions: 99-63-88*
Size: 130, 140
Price: $375
The SL 11 takes the necessary ingredients of a great race ski-energy, precision, stability and a little craziness-and combines them in a rocket. More agile and controllable than a GS ski, it still has the stability and power needed for that discipline. It's heavy, especially with the Atomic binding, but ready to rule the race hill.
"So much energy and bite. All I had to do was tip it up. And if I really pushed, wow!" - Emma
"Best slalom ski I've ever been on. Just roll your ankles and arc." -David
(* Dimensions vary by length; these are for 130 cm.)

Almost makes me wish I was a kid. The Atomic would be my first choice, followed by the K2. These three skis will resell at a strong price, due to the grown-up look of the ski.

Barrettscv
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by eugene
We rented equipment over these two years, and now I am thinking of buying some used skis for this coming season. Generally, we ski in northeastern US (where we live), but we will travel to the west next year.

This will be their third season for skiing, but they have not logged many hours on the slopes as of yet. We only go about 4X / year.
Eugene
I would not waist that kind of money for skiing four times a year. Rent the skis, boots, and poles for the enire season. You may have to travel a bit to find a shop that rents for an entire season but it is your best option.

Note you buy boots now that fit the kids and by mid January one of your kids feet have grown a full size or two. Kids feet do that. If you rent for the season they will let you trade in the boots for a different pair for the rest of the season.

BTW when you go ski out west on a deep powder day, your kids will fall and the skis will come off. Usually the din on ski bindings is set very low for children. It may take you an hour to find the skis under the deep powder. They sell powder cords that are bright ribbons that attach to the ski brake and get tucked under your pants. The only problem here is its a pain every time your child takes the skis off.

Rent the kids skis for the season. You will be glad you did.
post #19 of 21
Used equipement for kids?

I have plenty of gear around. How well trained are they? do they do choirs? Make their beds? Anything they do not eat?
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by eugene
... I had no idea ski shops offer season long rentals. That sounds like an option worth considering. It also might be a good way for me to review different equipment, for after reading these replies, I can easily see I have a lot to learn...
Eugene
One of the best deals for season long rentals in the Wachusett Mountain area can be found at White's Ski Shop on Route 62 in Princeton (heading toward Hubbardston just out of the center on the left next to the Pizza place). I have heard nothing but good things about them.
post #21 of 21
I have a pair of K2 kids Mod x's at 140cm, Mrker bindings, great condition (they were my son's) that might be just right for your daughter. I'd sell them for $65 plus shipping.
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