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Who makes the best ski gloves?

post #1 of 118
Thread Starter 
I ski in the Northeast, often its very very cold. I've worn some ordinary Drop gloves for the past year or two, but as part of my general upgrading of gear I think its worthwhile to own good gloves. Cold protection is paramount. I've been told to look at Black Diamond Guide Gloves or Bolle leather ski mittens. Any thoughts?
post #2 of 118
PM Gear Kevglove
post #3 of 118
HESTRA makes excellent gloves. So do others.
http://hestrausa.com/
They make gloves for the Swedish Army and the Swedes know something about cold weather.
post #4 of 118
Hestra do have a very good reputation for quality kit, but if it's real cold then go for mitts rather than gloves.
post #5 of 118
My Marmot Explorers have been great, they were an expensive purchase but worth it for me, i would recommend them, but if your in extreme cold mitts would be the way to go logically.
post #6 of 118
Grandoe's higher end GCS glove is unreal....it's got GoreTex in the outer shell so it breathes well, preventing the dreaded stinky glove syndrome

it's also insulated with Thermaloft so it's really toasty warm

it's got a soft wool liner layer underneath that can be removed and washed or taken out in the spring if conditions get warm

layered gloves are so much warmer than just regular insulated gloves..the same principals that work layering your torso work with your hands and maybe even more so

it's pricy at $89-99, but you won't need another glove for 10 years

p.s if your hands are really, really cold, check out their MC2 glove....it's got even more insulation in the fingers and is rated warmest glove every year by most magazines




GCS®—Glove Component System

Because the weather varies from bitter cold to warm and damp, you need more than just ordinary gloves. You need a complete system. A system that lets you customize your gloves for all weather conditions. Don't be fooled by imitations.

GCS® Glove Component System gloves are the only ones that feature a patented multi-layer design. Year in and year out, GCS® gloves have won acclaim from retailers, consumers and the press for their unsurpassed warmth, comfort and dryness. They are simply the highest-performing and most versatile gloves you can buy. Unlike ordinary 2-in-1 gloves, GCS® gloves are engineered to be worn without their inner-glove liners and still keep hands warm and dry under most conditions. That's because they are the only gloves on the market that are fully insulated, waterproof and breathable, even when their liners are removed!

http://www.grandoe.com/ski.aspx
post #7 of 118
I love Ocean and Earth Goretex gloves and mitts. They are totally waterproof: at the end of a rainy day on the hill, I somtimes seem to have the only dry hands in the locker room. They are a surf/snowboard company, but hands are hands. Inner side is all kevlar which cuts down on "feel" a bit, OTOH they are impervious to mole bites! And you can carry stuff like sharp skis without worrying.
post #8 of 118
There is a grat old thread about this from last season, do a search. For warmth you still can beat mittens. Unless necessary, don't get Gore-tex, you want as much breathability as possible, moisture is your enemy. Try the heater pack inserts, they work very well. Many gloves now have pockets for them on the back of the hand.
post #9 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquawMan
Grandoe's higher end GCS glove is unreal....it's got GoreTex in the outer shell so it breathes well, preventing the dreaded stinky glove syndrome

it's also insultated with Thermaloft so it's really toasty warm

it's got a soft wool liner layer underneath that can be removed and washed or taken out in the spring if conditions get warm

layered gloves are so much warmer than just regular insulated gloves..the same principals that work layering your torso work with your hands and maybe even more so

it's pricy at $89-99, but you won't need another glove for 10 years

p.s if your hands are really, really cold, check out their MC2 glove....it's got even more insulation in the fingers and is rated warmest glove every year by most magazines




GCS®—Glove Component System

Because the weather varies from bitter cold to warm and damp, you need more than just ordinary gloves. You need a complete system. A system that lets you customize your gloves for all weather conditions. Don't be fooled by imitations.

GCS® Glove Component System gloves are the only ones that feature a patented multi-layer design. Year in and year out, GCS® gloves have won acclaim from retailers, consumers and the press for their unsurpassed warmth, comfort and dryness. They are simply the highest-performing and most versatile gloves you can buy. Unlike ordinary 2-in-1 gloves, GCS® gloves are engineered to be worn without their inner-glove liners and still keep hands warm and dry under most conditions. That's because they are the only gloves on the market that are fully insulated, waterproof and breathable, even when their liners are removed!

http://www.grandoe.com/ski.aspx
I second these opinions.

I forgot my gloves one day and borrowed a pair of Grandoe CGSs from lost and found. I've been wearing Grandoes ever since.

I usually don't get cold, so I use them without the liners. But I keep a pair of liners in my bag for those REALLY cold days.

They don't get smelly like some other gloves, either.
post #10 of 118
Black Diamond has some good ones, so does Marmot.
Granite Gear had some good ones, but i think they are
out of that part of their business now.
post #11 of 118
fyi....Patagonia also has gloves that you can layer with different liners that work well, too

layering and breathability are the keys to warm dry hands just as it is with other parts of your body
post #12 of 118
My favorites have been Marmot. The "Ultimate Ski Glove" is a fantastic glove. Mine are a little bit less of a glove...lower model, although I'll be making the jump up to those soon. I've never been cold with mine. Always dry. Very comfortable. Have held up through 7 years of abuse with nary a duct tape bandage needed. They get full marks in my book.
post #13 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy
HESTRA makes excellent gloves. So do others.
http://hestrausa.com/
They make gloves for the Swedish Army and the Swedes know something about cold weather.
I second that! http://www.skiershop.com/catalog/pro...oducts_id=2224 Great deal if still available.
post #14 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidad55
I ski in the Northeast, often its very very cold. I've worn some ordinary Drop gloves for the past year or two, but as part of my general upgrading of gear I think its worthwhile to own good gloves. Cold protection is paramount. I've been told to look at Black Diamond Guide Gloves or Bolle leather ski mittens. Any thoughts?
Last season, I was planning my first ski trip to Vermont – for January – and bought the warmest Burton mittens. I can’t remember what the model name was last year, but I am pretty sure the Burton AK Continuum Fuse Mitt is the equivalent version for 2005-2006. I’d prefer a glove – and use them in temperatures above 20 degrees -- but I think you might need to go with a mitt to keep your hands warm on the coldest days. It was easy to grip my ski poles with the Burton mitt and my hands didn’t get cold or wet. The grip issue is an important consideration since some mitts are so pillowy it’s hard to hold on to a ski pole or anything else.
post #15 of 118
I've been using Swany gloves for many years now and highly recommend them. Before using these gloves I had to use mittens on cold days because I have poor circulation in my hands. With these gloves I can now ski comfortably down to 10F and can comfortably survive with charcoal heaters below that. They are rediculously expensive ($80-130 street) compared to run of the mill winter gloves ($20), but you do get what you pay for. These gloves are vastly more durable than "regular" gloves. The stitching uses "space suit" technology to help increase warmth.

caveat- Swany provides deals on gloves to PSIA members
post #16 of 118
I use the Swany's for colder weather, like under 10 degrees. They are great. I used the chacoal packs last year on a -5 day and was warm enough. The Hestras are for warmer weather, 15 and above. They do make a great frigid weather glove.
post #17 of 118
No gloves are warm much below 10-15 deg. Below this you def. need Charcoal packs or mittens or both depending on your tolerance.

I agree that Grandoe, Swany and Marmot, Black Diamond all seem to have some of the best gloves. I would say there is no one "best", but the first paragraph applies no matter which brand you choose.
post #18 of 118
I use Marmot randonee gloves for winter conditions. Never have had cold hands. For milder conditions I use Cloudveil snaz gloves. Both are excellent.
post #19 of 118
I just picked up a pair of cloudveil zero-g gloves. Haven't used them yet but they are very well made and seem warm yet breathable. Probably not suitable for below 10 deg F but for most conditions I'm sure they will be great.
post #20 of 118
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I think a good idea would be to have several pairs ones for normal cold and COLD cold. My hands don't get cold usually, but its better to have the right gloves when the top of Sunapee is 0 or below.
post #21 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by L7
PM Gear Kevglove
That's our little secret, L7. Shhhhhh........


Only enough left to take care of the home crew this year.
post #22 of 118
Excellent experience with Black Diamond and Marmot. Warm, durable, well designed. If you get really cold hands try the BD Mercury Mitts.
post #23 of 118
I have terrible circulation in my hands, and my fingers are always cold. I just picked up a pair of Black Diamond Guide gloves on sale at backcountry.com. They feel incredibly warm and are rated down to -20 degrees; hopefully, they'll do the trick.
post #24 of 118
Sierra Trading Post has several Hestra gloves for cheap right now.
post #25 of 118
Reusch by far, VERY warm in my experience. Not very waterproof, but if warmth is your goal, they are great. The universum is probably what you want if you don't race, the black ones without the carbon plate. Auclair also makes good ones.
post #26 of 118
Thread Starter 
Found Grandoe GCS for $27.00 a pair at sierra trading -- so we took those and we're going to get Marmot Men's Randonee Mitt's for the cold mitten days -- searching for a good price on those.
post #27 of 118
Another vote for Grandoe and GCS. Also, I've always felt that real leather is much better than fabric of any kind.

If you are one of those whose hands are always cold, buy mittens.
post #28 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidad55
Found Grandoe GCS for $27.00 a pair at sierra trading -- so we took those and we're going to get Marmot Men's Randonee Mitt's for the cold mitten days -- searching for a good price on those.

there are two kinds of Grandoe GCS gloves from prior years...ones that retailed for about $75 and ones that retail for about $99

the ones I have are the more expensive ones and they have **Goretex**

make sure the cheaper ones have Goretex because somebody on another board was complaining that the cheaper one didn't breathe and started to smell inside

edit: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/xq/...qx/product.htm

if these are the ones you bought, they don't have Goretex but some other type of breathable layer.....according to other people, it doesn't breathe as well

make sure to try them on in the house and see if they breathe and if not return them because you could end up with stinky gloves
post #29 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
Reusch by far, VERY warm in my experience. Not very waterproof, but if warmth is your goal, they are great. The universum is probably what you want if you don't race, the black ones without the carbon plate. Auclair also makes good ones.
I used to wear Reusch racing gloves (when I was racing, of course). I didn't think they were particularly warm, mainly because they tended to get wet and then took FOREVER to dry because they were all leather.
Plus, the tended to wear out pretty quick. I went through 2 pairs in 4 years of racing, whereas my current Marmots have been around for 7 or 8 years and really haven't worn out much at all.
post #30 of 118
for the warmer days, try motocross gloves. almost all manufacturers make a winter riding glove too. some have plastic on the top if you bang your hands around (especially in the trees), and others are gore-tex. for me, they fit better than any ski glove, and i haven't seen anything comparable for the money.
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