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Freeskier Magazine - Page 2

post #31 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u

As for the guy who said SKI and Skiing must be the favorites around here, well, that's pretty funny...If I wanted to know which lux-SUV/overpriced condo/Bogner suit/blah/blah to buy, I'll peruse the Rob Report.
I'm sorry, where did I say that SKI and Skiing must be the favorites here? Some people read what they want out of things, while others read things to get the point I was making. I simply stated that to prove that the "jibbing population" that reads Freeskier probably looks at SKI and Skiing the same way- as if no one would want to read it.
post #32 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
MBS,

you need to go to Paula's Ski Lovers if you want to know where the real SKI magazine fans hide.

LMFAO.
post #33 of 98
"Newschool skiing is the fastest growing aspect of skiing, and that demographic group is soon to be the largest group purchasing skis. They are the sports future weather you like it or not"
actually ns is the most marketed part of the sport but the fastest growing segment is the 45+ older maybe heading for retirement skier because they have money and want to spend it(as opposed to having their parents money and wanting to spend that).
much like any sport segment catering to teen aged consumers the sales are great until they go off to school/get a boyfriend-girlfriend/get a job and then there is a 5-10 year gap in any substantial purchases and when they return they may still be skiers but they won't be sliding rails risking a sex change(if you want a precedent check out the snowboard sales since the beginning)
and on a side note i have nothing against jib/newschool i work for one the originators of twins and sponsor my fair share of new school kids(and no racers, go figure)
post #34 of 98
post #35 of 98
That's some interesting stuff. Thanks Sluff.
post #36 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Wow, this thread is full of relevant, valuable information!

As far as Freeskier goes, it's simply another niche publication which deals with a focus (skiing) that is in and of itself a niche (as far as the publishing world is concerned). The writing, if you could call it that, is on the level of a Maxim or FHM. The photography? There's an occasional gem, otherwise it's as if they paid the photographer in beer. Up front. :
Please tell me again how me and my colleagues should be doing are job. Since you obviously dont have a clue how the ski publishing indsutry works, why dont I clue you in.

First off 90% of the images in freeskier are shot on spec, meaning that we photogs front the money, pay for all of the costs associated with that shoot, in hopes that we will make it back when we sell the images. Hence the highest paying mags get images first. Since Freeskier doesnt pay as much, as other mags, they dont get first pick. Secondly, the photos in that mag are actualy prety damn good, In fact if you think that they are so bad then go out and try to shoot some yourself. Freeskier's print quality seems to very from copy to copy, some copies the photos look great and in some they look out of focus. This has more to do with there printers inability to keep the registraion in check than anything the Freeskier staff does.

Finally the last 10% of the image in the mag are shot on assingment, including the shot of mine. When you are on assingment, you only have a few days to capture as many images as possible no matter what the snow, or weather conditons are like, or if the photog or athlets are sick. When I shot my assingment for them last year, we where dealing with 75~80 degree temps that completly shut down all shooting by noon. On top of that I was trying to keep up with and shoot the top 4 Female skiers in the industry while I was violantly ill with the flue. When magazines give a photographer / writer an assingment they are pre-buying content, for a space that they are pre-assining, and have to use the content that is produced on that assignemnt regardless of the condtions and what the photographer / writer has to work with.

Trust me everyone one at Freeskier is completly devoted to skiing even more so than all of the peeps that post on this board. Think about it can you really bitch about them providing the content that there demographic is asking for, especially since the vary people that put together the ski mags that you read have forgone higher paying opertunities inorder to pursue there dream and passion. Can you really say that you have done the same for skiing?


And as ar as getting paid in bear goes, I only wish I was that lucky.
post #37 of 98
Freeskier seems to do a decent job reaching its intended demographic. It sort of reminds me of SURFER magazine which I grew up with. SURFER has been around 40 years or so but still reaches a young demographic based on a focus on surfing photos, personalities, clothing and boards.

I grew up living several blocks from the beach but you can find SURFER at newsstands hundreds of miles from any ocean. Many who bought the magazine seldom surfed, and if they did, often on waves no bigger than 2-3 feet. But SURFER and magazines like it fueled imaginations and have managed to help keep the sport vigorous for decades.

If Freeskier can attract new people to the sport by doing something similar it's a good thing. For that matter, SKI RACING has improved a lot as well the last several seasons. I remember when it was printed on newsprint and often barely legible.

IMHO, SKI and Skiing mostly have nice pictures of new equipment. However, they will eventually inherit the Freeskier demographic if they don't self immolate first.

Edit: Typos.
post #38 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
Please tell me again how me and my colleagues should be doing are job. Since you obviously dont have a clue how the ski publishing indsutry works, why dont I clue you in.
First off 90% of the images in freeskier are shot on spec, meaning that we photogs front the money, pay for all of the costs associated with that shoot, in hopes that we will make it back when we sell the images. Hence the highest paying mags get images first. Since Freeskier doesnt pay as much, as other mags, they dont get first pick. Secondly, the photos in that mag are actualy prety damn good, In fact if you think that they are so bad then go out and try to shoot some yourself. Freeskier's print quality seems to very from copy to copy, some copies the photos look great and in some they look out of focus. This has more to do with there printers inability to keep the registraion in check than anything the Freeskier staff does.
Finally the last 10% of the image in the mag are shot on assingment, including the shot of mine. When you are on assingment, you only have a few days to capture as many images as possible no matter what the snow, or weather conditons are like, or if the photog or athlets are sick. When I shot my assingment for them last year, we where dealing with 75~80 degree temps that completly shut down all shooting by noon. On top of that I was trying to keep up with and shoot the top 4 Female skiers in the industry while I was violantly ill with the flue. When magazines give a photographer / writer an assingment they are pre-buying content, for a space that they are pre-assining, and have to use the content that is produced on that assignemnt regardless of the condtions and what the photographer / writer has to work with.
Trust me everyone one at Freeskier is completly devoted to skiing even more so than all of the peeps that post on this board. Think about it can you really bitch about them providing the content that there demographic is asking for, especially since the vary people that put together the ski mags that you read have forgone higher paying opertunities inorder to pursue there dream and passion. Can you really say that you have done the same for skiing?
Yes.

As much as I would love to reply to everything contained within your well-thought out post, the rampant spelling errors are simply too distracting. I understand you are a photographer and not a writer...hopefully those charged with actually writing the articles have a better grasp of the english language than you, my friend. If not, I'm willing to wager that Freeskier could save a bundle on editorial fees by finding people that possess a rudimentary understanding of the language, as well as the intellectual abilities to open a dictionary every now and then. With the savings that come from not having to proofread every word written three times, they could afford to pay the photographers better money!

FWIW, I did notice a shot or two (may even have been more) by Scot Markewitz...so it's not an entirely amateur rag.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
And as ar as getting paid in bear goes, I only wish I was that lucky.
Out of curiousity, if you were lucky enough to get paid in bear -- what type would you most desire? Panda? Polar? Or Pooh?
post #39 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy
If Freeskier can attract new people to the sport by doing something similar it's a good thing. For that matter, SKI RACING has improved a lot as well the last several seasons. I remember when it was printed on newsprint and often barely legible.
Agreed, Lostboy. Going by the industry statistics someone linked to earlier in this thread, however, this doesn't appear to be happening. Although twintip skis and assorted freeskiing paraphernalia was one of the best selling segments industry-wide last season, the majority of that gear was not being sold to newbies. Granted, there were some poseurs on K2 Public Enemies tooling around in a wedge, but a healthy majority of that gear was sold to long-time (yet still young) participants in the sport.

Given the slight drop in snowboarding hardgoods, it could be argued that the newschool movement managed to slow and/or reverse the diaspora of youth from skiing.
post #40 of 98
Iskitoofast... such a great argument, pointing out someone's spelling and grammar mistakes. I'm sure Baker appreciates it. Its an internet board, not a friggin English class.
post #41 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Yes.

As much as I would love to reply to everything contained within your well-thought out post, the rampant spelling errors are simply too distracting. I understand you are a photographer and not a writer...hopefully those charged with actually writing the articles have a better grasp of the english language than you, my friend. If not, I'm willing to wager that Freeskier could save a bundle on editorial fees by finding people that possess a rudimentary understanding of the language, as well as the intellectual abilities to open a dictionary every now and then. With the savings that come from not having to proofread every word written three times, they could afford to pay the photographers better money!

FWIW, I did notice a shot or two (may even have been more) by Scot Markewitz...so it's not an entirely amateur rag.



Out of curiousity, if you were lucky enough to get paid in bear -- what type would you most desire? Panda? Polar? Or Pooh?
Unlike you my time is too valuable to waist time proof reading shit for an internet chat room.
post #42 of 98
This is just one 18 year-old's opinion and I fully expect to get ragged on for it. While I don't doubt the fact that Freeskier Magazine is complete trash I resent the fact that many of you "older" folks in here seem to think of NewSchoolers as garbage that somehow stains the sacred sport of skiing. WAKE UP!

I have been skiing since I was 4 and I am certainly not a "jibber". I do not/have never wanted to own twin tips and I don't really go into the park that often. When I do go into the park i hit a few jumps and get some air (tried 360's but never landed 'em) and that's it. The park is not the main part of my run, it's just a more interesting route once i get to the flats near the bottom.

I go to New Schoolers all the time and I watch others in the park all of the time. A lot of these "kids" are pretty good skiers in addition to being good park skiers (although here at Sugarloaf the alpine racers are probably some of the best skiiers around).

There are 2 reasons that everyone here should be more open-minded:

1. Park skiing/riding brings revenue to the mountains
2. They are out there having fun and generally minding their own business.

Whatever gets you out on the hill is what I say
post #43 of 98
Talk about SPELLING errors?! I guess nobody's perfect,huh?
post #44 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdman829
This is just one 18 year-old's opinion and I fully expect to get ragged on for it. While I don't doubt the fact that Freeskier Magazine is complete trash I resent the fact that many of you "older" folks in here seem to think of NewSchoolers as garbage that somehow stains the sacred sport of skiing. WAKE UP!

I have been skiing since I was 4 and I am certainly not a "jibber". I do not/have never wanted to own twin tips and I don't really go into the park that often. When I do go into the park i hit a few jumps and get some air (tried 360's but never landed 'em) and that's it. The park is not the main part of my run, it's just a more interesting route once i get to the flats near the bottom.

I go to New Schoolers all the time and I watch others in the park all of the time. A lot of these "kids" are pretty good skiers in addition to being good park skiers (although here at Sugarloaf the alpine racers are probably some of the best skiiers around).

There are 2 reasons that everyone here should be more open-minded:

1. Park skiing/riding brings revenue to the mountains
2. They are out there having fun and generally minding their own business.

Whatever gets you out on the hill is what I say
Wise words from the future of the sport. Well said, Birdman.
Have a great season. Whatever you're riding, wherever you ride.
post #45 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
Unlike you my time is too valuable to waist time proof reading shit for an internet chat room.
let us all bow down now, and worship you.

there.

feel better now, tough guy?
post #46 of 98
and to think I always thought this was a message board

post #47 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
let us all bow down now, and worship you.

there.

feel better now, tough guy?
Damn, you guys are just way to serious. shit.
post #48 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
Damn, you guys are just way to serious. shit.
what?

I think both of us may have been using sarcasm.

I have no hourly rate for my time.
post #49 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by troutman
Are there exceptions to the rule? Sure, there always are, but from I've seen, most pure jibbers can't do anything in difficult conditions.
Well sure, if you frame it like that. That's the same thing as saying "most pure drag racing drivers can't do anything on an F1 road course."

FWIW, I know several (and probably more) of the top new-school athletes today are the product of respected race programs. The one that comes to mind at the moment is Henrik Windstedt, who spent a good deal of time racing for one of the Scandinavian national teams before breaking off to make money. Even the much-maligned Tanner "G-g-g-Unit" Hall spent some time racing, albeit at a lower level than Windstedt.

Regardless, these kids are phenomenal athletes. Given the right amount of experience, most if not all would adapt and eventually shine in difficult conditions.

Although there are large #'s of amateur new-school devotees who have taken the early snowboarder stance of eschewing lessons and just winging it instead, the skiers that stand on the podium at major comps and get signficant film time are the exact opposite for the most part.

Anybody see the competition last year, I think it was called "Bumps & Jumps" or something similarly corny...it was run on side by side courses consisting of a length of bumps, followed by a slopestyle course.
post #50 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Well sure, if you frame it like that. That's the same thing as saying "most pure drag racing drivers can't do anything on an F1 road course."
If you really want to bring motorsports into this, I would expand that to say that there are no current American race drivers of any type that could run at the sharp end of the F1 field. (and that saddens, me, BTW)

Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
FWIW, I know several (and probably more) of the top new-school athletes today are the product of respected race programs. The one that comes to mind at the moment is Henrik Windstedt, who spent a good deal of time racing for one of the Scandinavian national teams before breaking off to make money. Even the much-maligned Tanner "G-g-g-Unit" Hall spent some time racing, albeit at a lower level than Windstedt.

Regardless, these kids are phenomenal athletes. Given the right amount of experience, most if not all would adapt and eventually shine in difficult conditions.
Never said they weren't good athletes. Never said they weren't good for the sport.

I have two points relevant to "jibbing." First, many - certainly not all - of them are not great "all-mountain" skiers - they're just modern aerialists. Second, their impact on the ski industry, while positive, is not nearly as huge as they would like to think it is.
post #51 of 98
has anyone ever stopped to think about this:

if a jibmeister is such a good technical skier, why is he/she playing at the jib?

aerialist is a VERY good term, troutman.

in the MTB world similar rags have been ignited regarding the difference in skill level between top pro freeriders, and top DH racers. the big freeriders were thought to be in a class of their own. then at the Red Bull Rampage in comes Cedric Gracia, a DH/4X racer, and blows away the field. current and former DH racers continue to show overall superiority in the full spectrum of bike handling skills. but the big freeriders who are doing aerials are in their own specialty, and the ones doing the most difficult aerial moves are doing stuff that you're not likely to catch a DH racer doing, for fun or for glory. too risky for someone who wants to be on the bike racing DH, rather than recovering with waist-down paralysis or the equivalent. DH racing already is risky enough, no need to complicate it by throwing a 360 backflip in the mix.

jibbers are honing a different set of skills. it shouldn't come as a surprise that because of that, their overall skiing skill set decreases. if you spend 90% of your time working on aerial moves, it's only natural that the ski turn technique suffers merely because you're not practicing it.

it just makes no sense to argue that an aerialist could even compare to a top racer. not even an ex-racer aerialist.

nobody ever won an alpine ski race because of what he/she USED TO BE. they win because of how they are training and skiing RIGHT NOW.
post #52 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Anybody see the competition last year, I think it was called "Bumps & Jumps" or something similarly corny...it was run on side by side courses consisting of a length of bumps, followed by a slopestyle course.
I caught that last year.

I was hoping to see some of the older kids like JP and the other Canadiens hit the bumps but they weren't there.

I saw a clip of Mike Douglas flying through a mogul field on a Skier's World episode where he was in Portillo. He was cruising through them on Pocket Rockets without any issues. I guess you can do that when you used to compete and coach freestyle bumps.
post #53 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
has anyone ever stopped to think about this:

if a jibmeister is such a good technical skier, why is he/she playing at the jib?
I actually have stopped to think about this before and here's what I have come up with: they do it because they think it's fun @sshole. Why should they need another reason?

I'm also not sure where you get this idea of comparing them to top notch racers, because it wasn't from me. All I said was that a lot of them are PRETTY GOOD skiers.
post #54 of 98
I never said they could hold a candle to a top notch racer, Gonz...we definitey don't need to repeat the whole Bode vs. Tanner thing again! All I was trying to say is that they are better all-around skiers than many people give them credit for.

An interesting question is how do guys like Morrison, McConkey, Nobis, etc. compare to top racers today?
post #55 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
An interesting question is how do guys like Morrison, McConkey, Nobis, etc. compare to top racers today?
I'm pretty sure Nobis could hang...
post #56 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
An interesting question is how do guys like Morrison, McConkey, Nobis, etc. compare to top racers today?
I wouldn't compare top big mountain skiers to jibbers. Guys like Morrison still have a pretty good exercise regimen and are very strong athletes.

I think Gonz is talking about the kids that spend all their time in the park who can barely go down an ungroomed run. Not that there is anything wrong with that.
post #57 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Yes.

As much as I would love to reply to everything contained within your well-thought out post, the rampant spelling errors are simply too distracting. I understand you are a photographer and not a writer...hopefully those charged with actually writing the articles have a better grasp of the english language than you, my friend. If not, I'm willing to wager that Freeskier could save a bundle on editorial fees by finding people that possess a rudimentary understanding of the language, as well as the intellectual abilities to open a dictionary every now and then. With the savings that come from not having to proofread every word written three times, they could afford to pay the photographers better money!

FWIW, I did notice a shot or two (may even have been more) by Scot Markewitz...so it's not an entirely amateur rag.



Out of curiousity, if you were lucky enough to get paid in bear -- what type would you most desire? Panda? Polar? Or Pooh?
I would much rather read a post with content and minor spelling errors then the asinine arrogance of a douche from Connecticut.
post #58 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
has anyone ever stopped to think about this:

if a jibmeister is such a good technical skier, why is he/she playing at the jib?

aerialist is a VERY good term, troutman.

in the MTB world similar rags have been ignited regarding the difference in skill level between top pro freeriders, and top DH racers. the big freeriders were thought to be in a class of their own. then at the Red Bull Rampage in comes Cedric Gracia, a DH/4X racer, and blows away the field. current and former DH racers continue to show overall superiority in the full spectrum of bike handling skills. but the big freeriders who are doing aerials are in their own specialty, and the ones doing the most difficult aerial moves are doing stuff that you're not likely to catch a DH racer doing, for fun or for glory. too risky for someone who wants to be on the bike racing DH, rather than recovering with waist-down paralysis or the equivalent. DH racing already is risky enough, no need to complicate it by throwing a 360 backflip in the mix.

jibbers are honing a different set of skills. it shouldn't come as a surprise that because of that, their overall skiing skill set decreases. if you spend 90% of your time working on aerial moves, it's only natural that the ski turn technique suffers merely because you're not practicing it.

it just makes no sense to argue that an aerialist could even compare to a top racer. not even an ex-racer aerialist.

nobody ever won an alpine ski race because of what he/she USED TO BE. they win because of how they are training and skiing RIGHT NOW.


Hummmmm.........

Ever here of Andy Mahre???? The kid is one of the top jibers in the world, and he could still beat every one of you down a race cource any day.
post #59 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalce
I caught that last year.

I was hoping to see some of the older kids like JP and the other Canadiens hit the bumps but they weren't there.

I saw a clip of Mike Douglas flying through a mogul field on a Skier's World episode where he was in Portillo. He was cruising through them on Pocket Rockets without any issues. I guess you can do that when you used to compete and coach freestyle bumps.
mikey's a little different in terms of the new-school crowd. He's actually an old - school new-schooler who cross-overs to different disciplines. He can ski gates, big lines on mountains, and groomers pretty well. That's probably because he started doing the new-school shiznit before the only cool thing to do was hang with the brahs on the rails.

Plus he's a good business man and can say a few words on camera without sounding like an idiot. Definitely an all-rounder
post #60 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
Hummmmm.........

Ever here of Andy Mahre???? The kid is one of the top jibers in the world, and he could still beat every one of you down a race cource any day.
Ever hear of Huckingfellers; he can bust his a$$ on rails plus ribcage
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