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What ski poles to buy?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I recently bought Atomic M:9 metrons and my son got Atomic C:9's. He's grown so he needs new poles and I want new ones because we got cheapo ones with our atomic e:7's. So, how does one choose a ski pole? We are advanced intermediate skiers, like steep slopes but stick primarily to groomed trails. I'd like to buy good poles because in the grand scheme of things, even expensive ones don't seem that expensive compared to everything else you need. Any help would be appreciated.
post #2 of 20
Goode Carbons, do not bother w/ the 49.95 Vylons.
post #3 of 20
I would get something off of artechski.com , they have amazing prices on poles, like 50 bucks for 120 dollar race poles. I recommend swix.
post #4 of 20
They have to reach the ground
post #5 of 20
To paraphrase something once attributed to Phil Mahre: "if poles were that important the sport would be called poling not skiing."

If you use the search feature here you can find information on how to correctly size poles and thoughts on whether aluminum or carbon poles are better. If the one you like at the store are too long you can easily cut them down. But unless it is a telescoping pole you can't make one that's too short, longer.

Unfortunately, poles get bent or broken at ski resorts and are sometimes regarded as a somewhat fungible commodity at ski racks during lunch or break times. Accordingly, you may want to think about how much you really want to spend on a pair.
post #6 of 20
I like the composites because they are "softer" when they're planted. I have a pair of Lekis (love the trigger!) and Goodes. Both are good...
post #7 of 20
the only time i thought spending a lot on poles was worthwhile was when I got Scott Worlcup Racers. THose things almost never break and last me forever (like 5 years, whereas a normal set of poles would be lucky to make it through a season).

I bought some newfangled Leki's last year with that funky strap that pops out...the pole itself...meh, no difference, but they haven't broken yet so I'll see how they compare to my old Scott's.
post #8 of 20
I still have 3 pairs of The Royal Shaft (www.theroyalshaft.com) carbon fiber poles for sale. They're made by Goode.
post #9 of 20
I'm still using the Scott poles I got for Christmas back in 1976!
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
I like the composites because they are "softer" when they're planted. I have a pair of Lekis (love the trigger!) and Goodes. Both are good...
Well this is an interesting concept hmmm...."softer". I tend toward an "aggressive" pole plant, and have jammed my wrist a bit occasionally when skiing moguls.
post #11 of 20
My poles are so old there is no brand name showing anymore. I think I got them in 1985. Anyway, I like the grip on them, so would never replace them and I know they are the "throw away" quality. If I broke them, I would try and have the grips moved.
post #12 of 20
Whichever are around $10... that has always been my philosophy. I just can't justify the cost of anything else. I break one every year or two and go mismatched with some old ones or just buy a new cheap set.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vt Skier
Whichever are around $10... that has always been my philosophy. I just can't justify the cost of anything else. I break one every year or two and go mismatched with some old ones or just buy a new cheap set.
I'm the same way...except for the Scott World Cup Racers. Those really do last.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostboy
Unfortunately, poles get bent or broken at ski resorts and are sometimes regarded as a somewhat fungible commodity at ski racks during lunch or break times. Accordingly, you may want to think about how much you really want to spend on a pair.
I would second that on both counts. Last year I went out and spent bucks on a set of poles after my other set was "borrowed." A couple of days later they reappeared. Guess which poles got bent in the interim.

Go cheap, replace cheap.
post #15 of 20
my 2 cents.

I have spent most of my skiing life using Kerma poles, in fact since starting to ski at 13 I have only had two set of poles and both were Kerma. The second Pair I have been using since I was 20 and I'm now 33. the first pair I simply got too tall for.

I ski very hard, have bent them, landed on them and in all reality they should be broken but yet they refuse to die.

They are just the simple aluminium with gold clear handles with a good flat yet smoothly rounded top for flat land poling.

Also my poles have had leather straps and I love em. Lots of meat to rely on and something about the feel of a leather strap.

I personally beleive that a carbon or skinny wimpy style pole likely wouldn't last a season in my hands.
Kerma gets my vote.

Mark
post #16 of 20
I went to those skinny carbon poles a few years ago. I still have some aluminum Scott and pair of Kerma. My problem with the fat poles is, at the speeds I ski, they develop a lot of wind drag, especially on the groomed. That drag combined with swing weight makes them difficult to useless for timing in a turn. I don't recall ever breaking or severely bending poles.

Edit: This thread is related to the effects of shock on the elbows (epicondylitis), discussed in this thread from March earlier this year.
post #17 of 20
I can personally attest to the Leki WC sl poles being bulletproof, having fallen on them about 15-20 times in slalom courses, at speed. They have no trace of a bend or break, making them worth the 50 bucks.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
I went to those skinny carbon poles a few years ago. I still have some aluminum Scott and pair of Kerma. My problem with the fat poles is, at the speeds I ski, they develop a lot of wind drag, especially on the groomed. That drag combined with swing weight makes them difficult to useless for timing in a turn.
Exactly my thoughts. For me low swing weight is the most important in a pole, but at speeds the wind drag becomes the determining factor. So a skinny pole is what I have. It is a carbon composite of some kind.
post #19 of 20
I like the skinny composites (Goode), but the thievery angle IS something to consider. I've never had an issue, but friends have.
post #20 of 20
I've found it's best to actually not touch the ground with the poles when skiing fast. The winddrag interferes with them too, so I don't even use them in "pretend" touches for timing. I just use them for balance. I will admit to lusting over the aerodynamic poles that wrap around the body though.
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