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Tai Chi in skiing

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyK
Tai Chi: I tried to explain it
in my last post, but my
Waist Steering form has two
parts. 1) Learning how to
apply turning the waist,
coordinating the body, and
moving that downhill ski
through the turn. 2) Tai Chi
skills. When any of you learn
number 1), your carving skills
will instantly get better without
ever addressing number 2).
If you can start working on
number 2) your Waist Steering
form will get better and better.


1) "When any of you learn number 1), your carving skills will instantly get better without ever addressing number 2)," so your "Waist Steering" really has nothing to do with Tai Chi, doesn't it?

2) Ok, let's hear what's your "Tai Chi skills" that are applied to the Waist Steering. Gary got mad when I said you guys "name-dropping Tai Chi," and ducked the questions and said that you are the better-qualified person to answer the Tai Chi questions, now it's your chance to clear that up.


Quote:
For any of you who bought into
the crap spewing from taichiskiing,
I simply invite you to watch his
videos. My four year old skis better
than he does; and as far as his
Tai Chi skills, they are beginner
level on his best day.
Quote:


It sounds like a little knowledge spewing its little mind. Your "four year old" skis better than I do, eh? Guess only you, are dumb enough to believe that. With that said, your credibility on your words and how well you understand the Tai Chi skills come in to question.



Quote:
A real Tai Chi
teacher is an excellent pugilist;
a martial artist; a skilled fighter;
he or she will have no trouble
moving you around at will.


Still "name-dropping" "Tai Chi teacher," eh? Haven't seen you demonstrate any of those qualities in you posts. You are a businessman alright, but a Tai Chi martial artist? You ain't got no idea.


IS
post #2 of 29
Gary,
I opened your message but please never send me anything from IS/TCS. He is beyond my limited communications skills. Ignoring him is less than what he deserves, but all we can do. IMO he is an organic computer virus. JASP
post #3 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Gary,
I opened your message but please never send me anything from IS/TCS. He is beyond my limited communications skills. Ignoring him is less than what he deserves, but all we can do. IMO he is an organic computer virus. JASP
JASP, You know, you are right, man, I'm sorry!
post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Gary,
I opened your message but please never send me anything from IS/TCS. He is beyond my limited communications skills. Ignoring him is less than what he deserves, but all we can do. IMO he is an organic computer virus. JASP

Or maybe a organic computer WORM. -------Wigs
post #5 of 29
I opened this thread with some anticipation. To bad for all of us guess. maybe we ca nstill have an open and real discussion on the subject.

Gary I had given credit to Tommy for sayin that Fu style was requirement, I'm glad you finally clarified this for me in the video thread. IMHO, it is the underlying principles that transfer so well to skiing, and not visible, outside form. though I have to say, that the short videos on the Fu tai chi chaun web site do look interesting. Someday I'm gonna have to drive down for a seminar. This one at the end of Sept. falls right at the wrong time for me. Otherwise I would take Tommy up on the invite. I have thought of buying one of the videos and learning what I can from this, as I have been interested in how the different styles express the principles. Something our teacher here has encouraged us to do. Perhaps the simple beggining video or maybe the intermediate video for starters.

Now there is still the question of my seeing some double weightedness in the skiing videos. I think that Yeti may have inadvertantly shed some light on this for me. Too much yang energy. This could have this effect. Not allowing the smooth natural flow from one to the other. Even though I did see things differently in the end, my initial impression hasn't totaly gone away.

The idea that tai chi can be transfered to skiing is right on. The idea that tai chi influenced skiing will express itself in one form is as wrong as saying that one style of tai chi is better than another. Giving credit to tai chi principles for leading one into a discovery of new skiing form is not saying that. I can easily accept this as long as it doesn't shackle a person ot one form or style.

This could be a productive and intersting thread if anyone wanted it to be. One person doesn't own tai chi or the idea of tai chi skiing. Later, RicB
post #6 of 29
I don't know much about Tai chi (at all), but isn't the idea behind Tommy and Gary's discussion that the Tai Chi was the path that put them onto this idea? In any form Tai Chi is going to enhance your core strength, and ability to use your body in "proper" more efficient ways. Essentially you could practice Tai Chi, and then go skiing - ski nothing like you move while doing your Tai Chi, and still be a better skier because of your enhanced strength and balance. What Gary and Tommy appear to have done, is taken movements and "strengths" from Tai Chi and have found a way to adapt them to the modern ski racing turn. I doubt you will ever see one specific Tai chi movement in their skiing - as you would see it on foot, but some of the movements have been adapted to skiing - like that T-step thing Tommy had us all do. You would never actually do a T-Step while skiing would you? It would be foolish. The starting motion that you go through in in such a movement is what they have found useful. So in all fairness i say that we compare apples to apples.
Later
GREG
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB
I opened this thread with some anticipation. To bad for all of us guess. maybe we ca nstill have an open and real discussion on the subject.

Gary I had given credit to Tommy for sayin that Fu style was requirement, I'm glad you finally clarified this for me in the video thread. IMHO, it is the underlying principles that transfer so well to skiing, and not visible, outside form. though I have to say, that the short videos on the Fu tai chi chaun web site do look interesting. Someday I'm gonna have to drive down for a seminar. This one at the end of Sept. falls right at the wrong time for me. Otherwise I would take Tommy up on the invite. I have thought of buying one of the videos and learning what I can from this, as I have been interested in how the different styles express the principles. Something our teacher here has encouraged us to do. Perhaps the simple beggining video or maybe the intermediate video for starters.

Now there is still the question of my seeing some double weightedness in the skiing videos. I think that Yeti may have inadvertantly shed some light on this for me. Too much yang energy. This could have this effect. Not allowing the smooth natural flow from one to the other. Even though I did see things differently in the end, my initial impression hasn't totaly gone away.

The idea that tai chi can be transfered to skiing is right on. The idea that tai chi influenced skiing will express itself in one form is as wrong as saying that one style of tai chi is better than another. Giving credit to tai chi principles for leading one into a discovery of new skiing form is not saying that. I can easily accept this as long as it doesn't shackle a person ot one form or style.

This could be a productive and intersting thread if anyone wanted it to be. One person doesn't own tai chi or the idea of tai chi skiing. Later, RicB
1.50 Million MMB's! To bad the MVR is over

Right on RicB - I played with starting a new thread, we can have a discussion and just ignore the static/interference :
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
I don't know much about Tai chi (at all), but isn't the idea behind Tommy and Gary's discussion that the Tai Chi was the path that put them onto this idea? In any form Tai Chi is going to enhance your core strength, and ability to use your body in "proper" more efficient ways. Essentially you could practice Tai Chi, and then go skiing - ski nothing like you move while doing your Tai Chi, and still be a better skier because of your enhanced strength and balance. What Gary and Tommy appear to have done, is taken movements and "strengths" from Tai Chi and have found a way to adapt them to the modern ski racing turn. I doubt you will ever see one specific Tai chi movement in their skiing - as you would see it on foot, but some of the movements have been adapted to skiing - like that T-step thing Tommy had us all do. You would never actually do a T-Step while skiing would you? It would be foolish. The starting motion that you go through in in such a movement is what they have found useful. So in all fairness i say that we compare apples to apples.
Later
GREG
As Bumhauer would say to Hank, EeeeYup.
post #9 of 29
Hey Tai-Chi:

I've come to the conclusion that you are amazing. You are no doubt a better skier than 97% of the entire skier population. I always look for your pearls of wisdom and am eagerly awaiting the first substantial snow so I can try out your techniques.

I have also recently quit taking my thorazine.
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by irul&ublo
Hey Tai-Chi:

I've come to the conclusion that you are amazing. You are no doubt a better skier than 97% of the entire skier population. I always look for your pearls of wisdom and am eagerly awaiting the first substantial snow so I can try out your techniques.

I have also recently quit taking my thorazine.
That's funny, I just started taking my thorazine and Zyprexa - BOING!

irul&ublo - you the MAN (or woman as it may be). I too am "flatboarding" my way to the Master Worlds!
post #11 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Gary,
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
I opened your message but please never send me anything from IS/TCS. He is beyond my limited communications skills.


For a better communication [in knowledge], more memory/mental capacity, i.e. an open sound mind, helps.

Quote:
Ignoring him is less than what he deserves, but all we can do.


"There is no wisdom for being an ignorant."

Quote:
IMO he is an organic computer virus. JASP


Maybe just bugs in your software, if it helps you to debug.


IS
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Dranow
1.50 Million MMB's! To bad the MVR is over

Right on RicB - I played with starting a new thread, we can have a discussion and just ignore the static/interference :
You know Gary, I would say that the first thing I brought from my tai chi chaun practice into my skiing was simply the structural awareness that it enhances and really, demands. The ability to pay attention and to learn about the body in movement and all the relationships of the parts as they integrate into a whole is huge. And it only gets better from there.

I remember the frustrations trying to learn the first 13 forms, and it all seemed to take so much concentration and effort. Slowly the awakening of the body happens. then ski season starts, and what do you know, I was able to hit the snow with much more functional fitness than I had ever started a season with. I think the awakening of the structural awareness is key to this functional fitness. Without this developed awareness, the body does it's thing, but sometimes you never really know what it is doing. Maybe this doesn't make sense to some, but the body genius can short change us if we don't spend the time and effort to understand it.

Then as the concept of yin and yang grows and is nurtured, the idea of opposites and the principle of substantial and insubstantial grow. And these transfer very well to skiing also for me. As does the idea that as yin gets full, it becomes yang and vice versa.

Just some thoughts for now. Later, RicB.

P.S. The concept of "Four onces of effort to deflect 1000 pounds" is somethig I have only recently started to really understand, but I think the transfer to skiing is in the transition, as we control the forces and release and redirect them to move into the next turn. Subtle effort harnesses the forces. This coupled with "one part moves all parts move" is how I get to both the feet and the core being able to anchor a turn and serve each other to effect the intent without seperating them into over or under. anyway, enough for now.
post #13 of 29
Well Gary, I guess I fell for your bait and answered your PM in a very public way. Lesson learned, thanks...

IS if I publicly insulted you, let me take this opportunity to publicly say I am sorry.
This whole thread points out how wrong it was to denegrate you. While I do not agree with your presentation methods, or your opinions, I do feel we all need to show each other respect. Which I did not do, I am Sorry.
post #14 of 29
Well done JASP.

TCS, you know this whole insult exchange started with your naked king post about Gary. JASP has stood very tall with his last post. Do you wish to follow suit and stand just as tall? Here's how. Just sign off on the sentiment below and thank JASP for the wording;

Quote:
Gary, if I publicly insulted you, let me take this opportunity to publicly say I am sorry.
This whole thread points out how wrong it was to denegrate you. While I do not agree with your presentation methods, or your opinions, I do feel we all need to show each other respect. Which I did not do, I am Sorry.
TCS, you have some good thoughts, some of which I agree with. Don't let them get lost in anger. Rise above.
post #15 of 29
Just so this doesnt turn into bashing like it has in the past I would like to propose a discussion. I think the real underlying discussion here is the differences between what TCS/IS is presenting and what Tommy and Gary have presented. Both use a Tai Chi base for the movements on skis - but that is where the similarity ends (hence my apples to apples comment). Is there anything to be learned here - probably. Will anything be learned with the "my way or nothing else" approach - doubtful. The two ideas that are butting heads here are two completely different ideas - and should be treated as such - hopefully without attacking the other/different idea. With that said I'll leave the Tai Chi talk to the experts.
Later
GREG
post #16 of 29
Jasp, very nice! You have my respect.

Helluva, to limit tai chi chaun's tranfer to skiing to a discussion between flatboarding and MSRT, misses the point of what tai chi is. Both of these examples fit into tai chi.

A begining skier could very easily apply her/his tai chi experience and principles to learnig skiing. You can apply the priciples to falling if and when you need to.

Discussing the differences between Tommy/Gary's and IS/TCS's is like discussing the differences between chen style and yang style, or whether this form or that form works better applied to this situation.

I can apply these same principles to counter and HA too. You see, the control is still at the hips and waist. Confusing? Maybe, if you haven't been at least introduced to tai chi through a class from a respected teacher and have done your practice regularly.

This may be a discussion that is doomed from the begining because of the history of this subject on this site and the desire to limit it to the above mentioned two loud examples. I don't mean Loud negatively. There is no disrespect intended here.

Later, RicB.
post #17 of 29

The Yin and Yang of it

Quote:
Discussing the differences between Tommy/Gary's and IS/TCS's is like discussing the differences between chen style and yang style, or whether this form or that form works better applied to this situation. I can apply these same principles to counter and HA too. You see, the control is still at the hips and waist. Confusing? Maybe, if you haven't been at least introduced to tai chi through a class from a respected teacher and have done your practice regularly. -RicB
'nuf said
post #18 of 29
One key to becomming a better skier is knowing when you are really in balance. some people are so far out of balance that they rarely or never really are in balance (while sking). If taichi helps with getting in balance, it can be a plus in skiing. Some skiers have a really keen sence of balance and are able to make the approiate adjustments by natural movements. Most really good skiers are very close to being in (perfect) balance and know when they are a little out of balance and correct. So, taichi or not, being aware of your balancing skills is the first step in being in balance.
RW
post #19 of 29
Maybe applications was a better way to put it.. but maybe letting it die is a better choice.
Later
GREG
post #20 of 29
yea, ok, cool
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron White
One key to becomming a better skier is knowing when you are really in balance. some people are so far out of balance that they rarely or never really are in balance (while sking). If taichi helps with getting in balance, it can be a plus in skiing. Some skiers have a really keen sence of balance and are able to make the approiate adjustments by natural movements. Most really good skiers are very close to being in (perfect) balance and know when they are a little out of balance and correct. So, taichi or not, being aware of your balancing skills is the first step in being in balance.
RW
For sure. But maybe even more important than being in balance is the postures we are balancing in. It is in this area that the structural awareness grows early in tai chi. How we maintain our posture, not just staticly, but within the dynamic movement, that can really make a difference. Even with the really good skiers. I would just about bet my skis that even a WC class skier who started practicing tai chi regularly would realize a difference in their ability to move, with a heightened awareness of effective dynamic posture and their ability to stay rooted and balanced.

There are many world class athletes, of many sports, who have taken up a martial art to enhance their abilities and their functional athletisism. Tai chi does this wihtout the forced rigors of many of the hard arts. Later, RicB.
post #22 of 29

Total Body Awareness and Tai Chi

Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB
For sure. But maybe even more important than being in balance is the postures we are balancing in. It is in this area that the structural awareness grows early in tai chi. How we maintain our posture, not just staticly, but within the dynamic movement, that can really make a difference. Even with the really good skiers. I would just about bet my skis that even a WC class skier who started practicing tai chi regularly would realize a difference in their ability to move, with a heightened awareness of effective dynamic posture and their ability to stay rooted and balanced.

There are many world class athletes, of many sports, who have taken up a martial art to enhance their abilities and their functional athletisism. Tai chi does this wihtout the forced rigors of many of the hard arts. Later, RicB.
Once again I second what RicB has said. In our teaching paradigm the fourth element is Total Body Awareness (TBA). For many people when they are in gates it all becomes a blur, for the WC racer things often become VERY SLOW and quiet, the are aware of every muslce and each inch of the race course. I have experienced this in fighting, Motocross and Ski Racing and when time slows down I have performed better.

In Tai Chi we move quite slowly while dynamically keeping our balance as we flow from one movement to the next. It all starts with the rooted stance (Knees rolled out or outside of the big toe) and as we learn progressively more advanced forms our balance and body awareness only improves. I view Tai Chi as the key to developing TBA in race conditions. If you can balance and stay rooted in slow motion you can certainly do it at speed. JMHO.
post #23 of 29
I'll second your two points too, of time slowing down, or as I like to refer to it, time standing still as I move within, and the point of how slow practice developes ownership of our movements in their full range of motion, within a balanced rooted stance, fully integrated with breath work. I have simply not been exposed to a simpler, gentler, more effective way to this understanding than tai chi chaun.

Even if one doesn't accept all the inner philosiphy and priciples, the physical practice will still have a big impact on the health and wellness of a person. Most come to tai chi for just this reason. If that is all you want it is still a great practice. Later, RicB.
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Dranow
That's funny, I just started taking my thorazine and Zyprexa - BOING!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Dranow

irul&ublo - you the MAN (or woman as it may be). I too am "flatboarding" my way to the Master Worlds!


You mean that you are two persons before and after the medicine/drugs? Which one is really you, I mean "real" you? Funny that.

Among other things, welcome to Tai Chi in skiing, you'll find out who you really are, when you Tai Chi Skiing.

Tai Chi Skiing, the path to enlightenment,
IS
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
Well Gary, I guess I fell for your bait and answered your PM in a very public way. Lesson learned, thanks...
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro

IS if I publicly insulted you, let me take this opportunity to publicly say I am sorry.

This whole thread points out how wrong it was to denegrate you. While I do not agree with your presentation methods, or your opinions, I do feel we all need to show each other respect. Which I did not do, I am Sorry.


Wow... it takes a big man to open apologize in a public forum, you are a bigger man than I, I'm sorry for making so harsh comment on you, you do earn my respect, Thanks.

Flatboarding and racing-carving are two extreme opposite techniques in skiing techniques, and most other techniques lie somewhere in between, so flatboarding and extreme carving doesn't really in conflict but complement each other in making the full spectrum of skiing techniques.

Now, back to Tai Chi things, as I said, I carve-turned until 2001, where I got tired of edging, and went flatboard, in Tai Chi, it is called "Wu Ji Bi Fan," meaning things (Yin-Yang) reverse themselves when they go extreme, maybe as we are.

'later,
IS
post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB
You know Gary, I would say that the first thing I brought from my tai chi chaun practice into my skiing was simply the structural awareness that it enhances and really, demands. The ability to pay attention and to learn about the body in movement and all the relationships of the parts as they integrate into a whole is huge. And it only gets better from there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB

I remember the frustrations trying to learn the first 13 forms, and it all seemed to take so much concentration and effort. Slowly the awakening of the body happens. then ski season starts, and what do you know, I was able to hit the snow with much more functional fitness than I had ever started a season with. I think the awakening of the structural awareness is key to this functional fitness. Without this developed awareness, the body does it's thing, but sometimes you never really know what it is doing. Maybe this doesn't make sense to some, but the body genius can short change us if we don't spend the time and effort to understand it.

Then as the concept of yin and yang grows and is nurtured, the idea of opposites and the principle of substantial and insubstantial grow. And these transfer very well to skiing also for me. As does the idea that as yin gets full, it becomes yang and vice versa.

Just some thoughts for now. Later, RicB.


Thanks, RicB, for holding firm and keeping this thread on topics.

Your understanding of, (it's going to be a tricky part,) the internal/body movements of the external techniques of doing Tai Chi Chuan, is quite well. However, Tai Chi, as a principle, has no fixed form, and various style of Tai Chi Chuans are only different interpretation of such a principle, if their style indeed originated from Tai Chi. At the high end, Tai Chi, as Tai Chi Skiing for an example, is all mental/mental game. Guess that is the trivial part.

As I said, Tai Chi Skiing is like to "push hand" or "push feet" with gravity, only difference is when you skiing "push feet" with gravity, the feet/"ground" moves. And your body must be balanced and moved along "push hand" style with it, then you are into the "Tai Chi" Skiing.

The internal part of Tai Chi Skiing is how to coordinate the breathing to keep the blood flow/Qi under control and to nurture the viability internal organs' function to support the activity/skiing on hands, be that bumping in the moguls, flatboarding on the grooms, or dropping in to a pipe.

Beyond that, it's the reflection on the "concept" of gravity, yah, the Cosmos, and the meaning of life thingy, it's all mental, though without technique, you won't get there.

Yes, you're right, you don't need the in-depth knowledge to enjoy the benefit of applying the Tai Chi techniques in skiing; it all takes applying, doing and experiencing.

Quote:
P.S. The concept of "Four onces of effort to deflect 1000 pounds" is somethig I have only recently started to really understand, but I think the transfer to skiing is in the transition, as we control the forces and release and redirect them to move into the next turn. Subtle effort harnesses the forces. This coupled with "one part moves all parts move" is how I get to both the feet and the core being able to anchor a turn and serve each other to effect the intent without seperating them into over or under. anyway, enough for now.


Yes, "Four ounces of effort to deflect 1000 pounds" is also a Tai Chi technique to apply in skiing brilliantly; that is a technique uses the skier's momentum to deflect a stronger G force and to change direction. Another technique works well, too; with two equal forces push against each other, sometime it's hard to overcome the other side to get to go the way you wanted, like pushing the gravity, however, you can still channel your opponent's energy in your favor by yielding, i.e. hold/balance gravity, then reduce the force just a bit, let the gravity push you. It is called "reduce one (while maintain the full posture) to be useful." They are all techniques called "Yi Rou Ke Gong," soft overcomes hard.

'later,
IS
post #27 of 29
RicB, and Gary,
Interesting points about time slowing down. When I ski, it seems like slow motion to me, like time slowing down eventhough I am traveling just as fast or faster than other skiers around me. When clinicing instructors (or clients) who are a little out of control (and balance), they feel like time is moving too fast for them and they can't keep up with the events around them.
In the race course (gs), I keep my movemnets slow and precise as possible looking 2 to 3 gates ahead. Many skiers only see a blur as they desend through the course. World class athletes are able to slow time down more than I seem to be able to by a lot, I am shure.
RW
post #28 of 29
IS, some good points about tai chi. I don't know where my journey wiht tai chi chaun will take me, but I do try to take mind but leave my opinions at the door. This in and of itself is good for me.

Your point about reducing the effort, yet maintaining the form, is something we have practiced alot with our teacher, that has great transfer to skiing. When I think of maintaining the form in movement, I think of maintaining my root as I move from my center. Reducing effort while maintinaing our root is something that can be very ellusive in skiing. As we moved from one posture to another we used to imagine letting or sending our energy under the floor, as we move smoothly from substantial to substantial. The outcome is exactly that, to move through the form by reducing the effort, yet maintaining the form.

When you feel this, it can easily transfer to skiing and the idea that we can use both the feet and the core as anchor as we move through our forms from turn to turn. Soft overcomes hard, as we give up neither our root or moving from our center, yet we yield.

Fall session of my tai chi chaun classes start soon. I have alot to talk about to my teacher. In particular, I'm looking forward to more push hands practice. Refining those sticking and listening skills that are so transferable to skiing.

Ron, I can surely attest to what you say about things happening too fast sometimes myself.

From a teaching perspective, this is where follow the leader becomes such fun and so effective. The follower(s) have been removed of the tactical descision of where to go and can focus on what to do. Things are slowed by reducing the choices, and the mental effort. Especially when the leader role is shared by everyone, and you have a good playground. Also a great to experience different tactical descisions, and their effect on our skiing. Leads to great discussions. I like to sneak in little challenges that happen too quick to think about. Later, RicB.
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB
IS, some good points about tai chi. I don't know where my journey wiht tai chi chaun will take me, but I do try to take mind but leave my opinions at the door. This in and of itself is good for me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB

Your point about reducing the effort, yet maintaining the form, is something we have practiced alot with our teacher, that has great transfer to skiing. When I think of maintaining the form in movement, I think of maintaining my root as I move from my center. Reducing effort while maintinaing our root is something that can be very ellusive in skiing. As we moved from one posture to another we used to imagine letting or sending our energy under the floor, as we move smoothly from substantial to substantial. The outcome is exactly that, to move through the form by reducing the effort, yet maintaining the form.


Yes, right on.

Quote:
When you feel this, it can easily transfer to skiing and the idea that we can use both the feet and the core as anchor as we move through our forms from turn to turn. Soft overcomes hard, as we give up neither our root or moving from our center, yet we yield.


Yes, you guys already went over that anchored on the feet to do cross-over and anchored on the core to do cross-under; however, on a faster line, I often only concentrate on my core (Dan-Tian) and move it down on a desired line and let the feet bounce around to support it, because the core is traveling in balance, I don't need to make a full turn to change direction, some simple check and deflection with the feet/skis would meet that balance already. My feeling is, that is how Bode skis on his racing, too; that's why people see he seemingly skis all over the place, but he still goes the fastest.

Quote:
Fall session of my tai chi chaun classes start soon. I have alot to talk about to my teacher. In particular, I'm looking forward to more push hands practice. Refining those sticking and listening skills that are so transferable to skiing.


Very good, push hands practice will definite improve your sticking and listening skills, and the body core movements to balance the external pressure/force; as well, with gravity, push feet, Tai Chi Skiing, fun.

'later,
IS
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