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Tele newbie needs help

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
How do you know when a pair of G3 bindings are correctly adjusted to a new pair of boots?
post #2 of 16
Tension the spring just enough so the boot can't move in the binding...

Easiest way of telling is to try to tur the boot side to side while on the chair, with your ski hangiing free... If the ski follows, it's all good, if there's a little delay, it's too loose.

Was that clear? Not sure if I understand that myself... ;-)
post #3 of 16
Also, make sure that the cable lever is set in the groove in the back of the sole of your boot when making adjustments or skiing. It is easy to mistakenly put it on top of the sole, which kinda works for skiing but puts a little slack in the cable that can cause problems. The lever should stand fairly staight up and not rest against the back of your boot if the cable is adjusted correctly.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Good advice. Thanks.
post #5 of 16
I find a range of adjustment works better for varying snow surface with the G3 binding. That is because the more tension you have the more shovel engagement you'll have and vice verse.

Tighter for a firm surface and looser for a soft surface.

Better yet, go with a binding that has a variable fulcrum point like the HammerHead and leave the tension alone.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven
I find a range of adjustment works better for varying snow surface with the G3 binding. That is because the more tension you have the more shovel engagement you'll have and vice verse.

Tighter for a firm surface and looser for a soft surface.

Better yet, go with a binding that has a variable fulcrum point like the HammerHead and leave the tension alone.
That´s interesting advice on the G3...
I have never even considered adjusting tension, except for skinning, but that problem is now solved by G3.

I ski them slightly over tensioned, it works for me in all conditions.
post #7 of 16
By over tensioning the cables on the G3 aren't you trying to make a "passive" binding into an "active" one? Isn't it designed to be passive, as opposed to the active Hammerhead that greatly increases tension with the forward lean, and consequently rips on hardpack but sucks for climbing?
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot
By over tensioning the cables on the G3 aren't you trying to make a "passive" binding into an "active" one? Isn't it designed to be passive, as opposed to the active Hammerhead that greatly increases tension with the forward lean, and consequently rips on hardpack but sucks for climbing?
It has that effect I guess.
But I atually started doing it to prevent the skis from ever coming off while skiing...

And now I've gotten used to it.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot
By over tensioning the cables on the G3 aren't you trying to make a "passive" binding into an "active" one? Isn't it designed to be passive, as opposed to the active Hammerhead that greatly increases tension with the forward lean, and consequently rips on hardpack but sucks for climbing?
Agreed. That's why G3 now has that level feature which allows you to flip down the heel when skinning up so you have less cable resistance
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot
By over tensioning the cables on the G3 aren't you trying to make a "passive" binding into an "active" one? Isn't it designed to be passive, as opposed to the active Hammerhead that greatly increases tension with the forward lean, and consequently rips on hardpack but sucks for climbing?
I think you mean neutral in stead of passive. The HH has the same feel in the third pin position (counting pins from front to back) as the G3.

I climb with the HH. I skin with the HH heel upside down to get a free hinged feel without moving the pin position. That's a nice feature when yo-yo skiing.
post #11 of 16
I have not had any experience skiing with the HHs or other active bindings. I know a lot of people swear by them, but I never liked the feeling of increased cable tension on my back ski. It just seems to stop the boot from flexing and jams my toes. (Note: I ski Garmonts which have a stiff toe and soft upper flex, which is the exact oppisite of Scarpas.)

As long as there is enough tension to keep your boot from twisting, what is the point of making it harder to lean forward in the binding when you want to?
post #12 of 16
I think with active binding the spring tension helps the boot to flex at the bellows, kind of opposite from what you are saying.
post #13 of 16
That seems counterintuitive to me. Isn't it the farther you try and flex the bellows the more the binding resists?
post #14 of 16
No, the pivot placement is such that tension decreases when sole of boot is flexed. The distance from toe to heel gets shorter when boot is flexed right? So cable can be designed to do the same.
post #15 of 16
How 'bout a picture?

HH binding in pin position #1


HH binding in pin position #5


G3 Targa binding
post #16 of 16
Thanks you guys. You have just solved another one of the mysteries of tele for me. I appreciate your patience. Sounds like I might need to try some Hammerheads this season.
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