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Skiing and Giant Sequoias???

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Does anyone have any pics of skiing through giant sequoias? If so would love to see them.
post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
Does anyone have any pics of skiing through giant sequoias? If so would love to see them.
K2 in the early 90's had a poster of Scott S. taking air besides one in Cali. Other than that I havent seen many shots, but if some one has them, theyd be cool to see.
post #3 of 16
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for those pictures. Man, those things are huge! Never seen one in real life. Gonna have to make a trip. Would love to rip some lines in some pow through a bunch of those babies if possible



Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbakerskier
K2 in the early 90's had a poster of Scott S. taking air besides one in Cali. Other than that I havent seen many shots, but if some one has them, theyd be cool to see.
That is what I am looking for! Some action shots would be great. Candy for the eye
post #5 of 16
Not to dampen your enthusiasm, bud, but my totally uninformed tourists impression is that all the Giant Sequoias that Ive ever seen are in protected, relatively flat locations that are seem way too flat for alpine skiing. With their size these trees certainly would seem to need a good deep root system to prevent themselves from falling over in a good blow. Deep soil isn't something theres usually a lot of on slopes steep enough to rip on.

I seem to remember seeing their cousins the Coastal Redwoods growing on pretty steep slopes, but they are in parts of CA that don't see all that much snow.

Maybe somebody from California can chime in with the real story on this and straighten me out if I'm wrong.

By the way - u think that kid in the second picture always goes around with a tree growing out of the top of er head? :

YOT
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoungOldTimer
Not to dampen your enthusiasm, bud, but my totally uninformed tourists impression is that all the Giant Sequoias that Ive ever seen are in protected, relatively flat locations that are seem way too flat for alpine skiing. With their size these trees certainly would seem to need a good deep root system to prevent themselves from falling over in a good blow. Deep soil isn't something theres usually a lot of on slopes steep enough to rip on.

Maybe somebody from California can chime in with the real story on this and straighten me out if I'm wrong.

By the way - u think that kid in the second picture always goes around with a tree growing out of the top of er head? :

YOT
Yeah, she must have really strong neck muscles !
I was not sure if they would grow in areas that are able to alpine style ski in. That is why I said if possible. To be honest with you I have never been out west at any other time but winter. I love my winter. "Winter" man that word puts a smile on my face
post #7 of 16
I have skied at Mt Bachelor where I seem to recall weaving through some pretty large timber. But I have pictures of some monstrous timber we skied in and about at Alpine Meadows, they may not have been sequoias but they were not to far from that size.

Alfonse
post #8 of 16
Huck, cool fantasy. Here's a shot showing people snowshoeing among the Sequoia's: http://community.webshots.com/photo/...33657727zzuqoN The album this comes from has other nice shots that should get you stoked.
I was in Sequoia Nat'l Park about 15 yrs ago in summer. A beautiful and unique world treasure. It would certainly be a great place to snowshoe or cross-country ski on all the well established and scenic hiking trails. From the southwest approach you have to drive several miles up a steep incline to get to the Park-run lodges/cabins among the largest trees. I don't know what their winter-use rules are. It might be possible to back-country ski down some fairly steep terrain beside one of the switchbacking roads and hop a car back up again?
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoungOldTimer
I seem to remember seeing their cousins the Coastal Redwoods growing on pretty steep slopes, but they are in parts of CA that don't see all that much snow.
The coastal redwoods thrive in a climate that has four seasons: early spring, late spring, early fall, and late fall. It rarely gets really cold along the northern California coast -- it rarely snows, maybe a dusting once every three years -- and it rarely gets really hot. It's foggy in the morning throughout the summer, mainly because of the cold Humboldt current, and the moderating influence of this fog keeps the temperature within the narrow, ideal range for the redwoods.

The coastal redwoods and giant sequioas grow fast and are both used as landscaping trees outside of their native zone -- you see a lot of them along city streets and highways in Oregon -- but outside of their narrow native ranges, they never reach the awesome size that they are capable of reaching. I planted a 4-foot coastal redwood in my back yard in Oregon 5 years ago and it's about 25 feet high now, but it's never going to look like one of those trees that the Ewoks used as slalom poles in one of the Star Wars movie. If you're a big tree fanatic like me, and you happen to be in Redwood country, don't miss the Stout Grove in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park. The road from Crescent City to the Grove winds through some breathtakingly huge trees. It's gravel in sections, but ideal for a mountain bike.

I think the big trees you see in the Sierra are mostly Sugar Pine. In the cascades (Bachelor, Mt. Bailey) you can ski through some big old Doug Fir. There are some honking big Western Red Cedars that grow in snow country, but a lot of the really big cedars were the first trees to be logged since the wood was, and is, so desirable.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Jamesj, thanks for that link. There are some pretty cool photos in there, especially photo #2 of 40. These trees definately are a treasure and need to stay that way. They are gorgeous!!
post #11 of 16
The closest you will get to this fantasy is Yosemite.

There is a giant redwood grove (probably where the pictures were taken) in the park. It probably get's snow every year but I believe that area of the park is now closed to visitors during the winter. You can probably snowshoe or trek through the area. I bet AC would know.

DC
post #12 of 16
P.S.

The redwood grove/Sequoia grove trees are a "cousin" to the giant coastal redwoods. Not exactly the same species.
post #13 of 16
So Californians - do you ever see Sequioas on the sides of hills steep and long enough to alpine ski or are they usually down where its flatter? That was what I couldnt exactly remember.

YOT
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
I doubt you would see a tree so large on the side of a steep hill , I think someone said that. It ws a good point to because these trees have to have a massive root system which would require Some pretty deep dirt I would imagine. Most steep slopes are pretty rocky or at least rock under the soil. But if someone odes now please do tell. That would be worth a trip for me just for the pictures to add to my albums.
post #15 of 16
actually these trees have a relativly shallow root system. Pretty amazing considering how large they grow. The area the root system covers is massive however.

Depends what you consider alpine skiing. remember, to a beginner, 2% slope get's scary fast.:

Generally though the redwood groves I've hiked are pretty flat.

DC
post #16 of 16
here's a link to some more info re:giant sequoias
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