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How much is gas in your area - Page 2

post #31 of 156
$ 2.57 on Monday and between $ 3.29 and $ 3.59 today (Friday)

From the looks of the rest of the posts....I'm getting killed here.
post #32 of 156
I don't know. I mounted a headlight and rear flasher on my bike and stopped paying attention.

-T
post #33 of 156
I haven't purchased gasoline since last winter, but I expect I will feel the pinch this winter. I'm planning on getting some skiing this year and rental cars are a big part of the plan.
post #34 of 156
I found some for $2.89 this morning; the same station is now at $3.09.
post #35 of 156
$5.85/gallon this morning!!


But that's in sydney Austr (up 30% last couple of months) =$US4.38.
post #36 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tele-Swede
Quit whining!

Roughly $6.25/gal where I live!
Everytime I hear that from the Europeans, I have to ask, is a barrell of oil cheaper in the US than in Europe (No). There are just more taxes piled on gasoline products in Europe.

Consider our driving distances also, unless you live in a big city, the daily commute can really eat up the budget.

Also, a good comparison for those in the rockies, England, Scotland and Wales would completely fit inside the state of Colorado.
post #37 of 156
Ok, I've been reading and trying to avoid this thread but, I have a couple of observations I would like to put out there.

1.) Gonzo is right. We ought to be paying as much as the Europeans. The problem is, we don't have the mass transit infrastructure that Europe has. I can get from London to Prague without renting a car or getting on a plane. You can't do that in the US. There is Greyhound but, it takes 40 hours to go 1000 miles. There is Amtrak but, it is slow and goes to very limited locations. And those locations have no connections to other places. Singapore has high speed rail service but not in America.

2.) We are way too attached to our cars. I am a field mechanic and put in alot of windshield time. Most private vehicles I see commuting in traffic have one person in them. In Europe people tend to live close to their work. Minimizing commuter impact or they use mass transit.

3.) We need to get away from the "mine is bigger than yours" mentality. I can understand someone needing a big F350 pickup if he is hauling hay or horses or heavy equipment but I see soccer moms driving the kids around and going to the mall in a vehicle as big as a tank. Then they can't even get it into a parking space because it's too big. Rediculous. I saw 1 pickup while touring Europe and it was a parks department truck with lawnmowers in it. Even at that, it was a midsize.

4.) Many will disagree but Europeans can live with the high prices of fuel simply because they are smarter than us. They walk or bike between neighborhoods, take short trips in the car(quick trips to the grocery or dating), long trips on mass transit(across town or to other countries). They have developed their infrastructure to handle and move alot of people efficiently and effectively. We have a few cities that can move people (San Francisco, Boston etc.) but for the most part in America we are stranded without our cars. Our cities are not pedestrian or bike friendly.

Sorry about the rant but, I am not happy with the current state of our country. We are greedy, wasteful and egotistical. We cater to the elite and leave the poor huddled together in a ravaged city. I am done.

Peace
post #38 of 156

Cheap Gas Websites

Here are 2 good cheap gas websites:

www.GasBuddy.com

* Seems to have more frequently updated prices and a broader selection but this may vary depending upon location so check both websites.

* Shows trends in Unleaded Gasoline Average Prices section which compares your city to total U.S. or Canada for Today, Yesterday, One Week Ago, One Month Ago, One Year Ago.

* Also trends shown graphically for up to 3 areas in Price Charts/Pump Price Graphs section with charts for 1 months, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, 1 year, 18 months, 2 years, and 3 years

* Search by Area, Station or Prices in last 60 hours, 48 hours, 24 hours, 12 hours, 8 hours, 4 hours.

* Shows only Regular or Diesel not Mid or Premium gas prices


www.GasPriceWatch.com

* Shows Regular, Mid, Premium and Diesel gas prices

* Gas Gap section shows U.S. Highest Price, US Average and US Lowest Price

* Search by Intersection, Zip Code, Station, Latitude/Longitude



As of 9/1 the highest price was $4.50 in Chamblee, GA; the US average was $3.05 and the lowest price was $2.35 in Buffalo, WY
post #39 of 156
First place didn't list a single station in my town.

Second place had prices from 3 days ago. Considering what's going on, that's not much help.
post #40 of 156
Today (Thursday, Sept 1st) during my lunch hour in Vancouver, Washington (just north of Portland, Oregon) I paid about $2.799 / gal at Chevron (sp?) for regular unleaded.

Was very pleased with the price.

Numerous cars were there filling up, more than I normally see at that station. One guy was filling up a couple of 5 gallon gas containers.

By the way, I also agree with Gonzo: we should be paying $5 or $6 per gallon for gas. That would help encourage people to use public transportation, ride bikes, and buy more fuel efficient vehicles. Too bad we can't have a $2 or $3 per gallon gas tax, and put the money towards either paying off the national debt, alternative energy research, or both.
post #41 of 156
I'm back in Boston for a few days. Just checked tonight at the gas station near B.U. on Comm Ave next to Ski Market (yes, I was getting my equipment lust going):

Regular: 3.39
Plus: 3.59
Premium: 3.79

These guys are usually about 20c/gal above everyone else, due to urban location and only game in town along Comm Ave for about 5 miles.
post #42 of 156
Midnight Tuesday in Boulder (few stations open): 2.799. Today in Gunbarrel, 2.699.
post #43 of 156
Cheapest I found in Richmond, VA was 3.09/gallon. The highest has been 3.49/gallon. Have seen three stations closed due to no gas................
post #44 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave86
By the way, I also agree with Gonzo: we should be paying $5 or $6 per gallon for gas. That would help encourage people to use public transportation, ride bikes, and buy more fuel efficient vehicles. Too bad we can't have a $2 or $3 per gallon gas tax, and put the money towards either paying off the national debt, alternative energy research, or both.
Not all of us live in cities with excellent mass transit systems. Some of us actually "live" in ski country. Ever try to find a bus from the country to the city?
post #45 of 156
Well, I live in a country village (population <2000).
For leisure/shopping:
Anywhere under a couple of miles, I'll walk or cycle.
If I'm going into London, I take the train - a 5 mile drive to a station, then $30 for a return ticket. Not only is that cheaper than driving, it's faster, and I don't need to worry about parking when I get there.
I'm about to go out and fill up my car - it's $6.60 a US gallon for unleaded. My car does about 28mpg (US).
Public transport is a case of demand/supply - if no one uses it, then there will be less. Perhaps you should raise the issue of public transport with your politicians?
post #46 of 156
I dont need a car where I live in The Netherlands. Cycle everwhere.

However, I did notice just a hour ago passing a Shell Garage that 1 litres of Unleaded was €1.42

That would equate to €6.46 a gallon

or $8.10 a gallon.

You got some way to go to catch us up on gas prices !!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #47 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanton
1 litres of Unleaded was €1.42
That would equate to €6.46 a gallon
or $8.10 a gallon.
You got some way to go to catch us up on gas prices !!!!!!!!!!!!!
Hey, gas is cheaper in France ! 80% of the retail price are taxes. But you're not close to catch us up either...
Now, my daily commuter, a honda 125 CLR, averages 80MPG, if my conversion is correct.
post #48 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry_Morgan
Since you're asking:
Gasoline Tax
State ¢ Per Gallon


Rhode Island [2] 31
Wisconsin [2] 28.5
.
.
.
Alaska 8
Georgia [3] 7.5 [4]

The states with [2] or[3] have variable rate taxes which may include a percentage sales tax. The other 35 states have a flat excise tax.
In addition there's the 18.4 ¢/gal federal excise tax (24.4 ¢ for diesel) that's included in all states.
post #49 of 156
Some of you just don't understand what it is like living in the country (not a "country village"). You live 5,10-20 miles even from a gas station in some places. The nearest grocery store takes 20-40 min. by car in some places. Do you think riding your bike to the store is an option now????


I live only 10 min or so to the grocery store, but I know places in the ADK's in NY that people do live 20-40 min. away from getting their groceries.

Good luck getting mass transit in the forest....
post #50 of 156
offpiste: great posting!

Sprawl has damned the U.S. to being enslaved by petroleum. Over the past century, the U.S. has decommissioned and destroyed regional rail lines that could be put into good use for commuter trains. Bicycles are still treated by most motorists as second-class citizens, even though federal highway laws treat them as equals on virtually every road.

Cheap oil lulled the U.S. into submission. We built unreasonable, sprawling suburbs that had no connection to their hub cities other than private cars. Sure, there's the occasional bus line that services the outlying communities, but that's still the exception.

In my case, I live in Washington, DC. I'm a little more than a mile from the White House. I ride my bike or walk almost everywhere I need to go. The grocery stores are within walking distance, as is my job. I do own a car, but only drive it in well-planned trips to either purchase things that can't be easily obtained in the city, or to places that are not served by buses or trains. That averages to one trip per week, if that.

And frankly, I'd be happy if gas prices stuck at $3 to $4 per gallon. Frankly, the population won't change behavior without a good jolt, and this might be the jolt that is necessary. It's painful medicine, but necessary.

Just my $0.02 - your mileage may vary.
post #51 of 156
I am 3 miles from the ROAD (that is, road that takes you to somewhere), then another 3 miles to the grocery store. 20 miles to the nearest "shopping center" and 3 hours from the interstate. My mailbox is a mile from the house. If the drive to the "road" wasn't a pretty steep drive down (and hence back up) I'd bike it, but since I work on my feet all day, the last thing I'd be ready to do at the end of the day was bike UP. (Yes, I know I'd be that much more in shape, but there's no one to just get up and fetch me -- which of course would cancel out the benefit, gas-wise, of biking -- if I pooped out on the way home.)
post #52 of 156
Quote:
Some of you just don't understand what it is like living in the country (not a "country village"). You live 5,10-20 miles even from a gas station in some places. The nearest grocery store takes 20-40 min. by car in some places. Do you think riding your bike to the store is an option now????


I live only 10 min or so to the grocery store, but I know places in the ADK's in NY that people do live 20-40 min. away from getting their groceries.

Good luck getting mass transit in the forest....


I would just like to add to this a little bit....

There are many elderly people who live in situations like this aswell. They probably don't have very much money to get by, based on the shape their homes are in and other observations.

What are they to do when gas goes up to $6/gallon, ride a bike for a couple of hours to the store???

I just wanted the people who think like this
Quote:
And frankly, I'd be happy if gas prices stuck at $3 to $4 per gallon. Frankly, the population won't change behavior without a good jolt, and this might be the jolt that is necessary. It's painful medicine, but necessary.
to think a little before making these kind of statements.

Granted there are a lot of people who do just plain waste gas.
post #53 of 156
Well, the thing is, many other countries can cope with gas at $6+ per gallon. What you have to do is get used to it!
I don't earn a massive salary, I drive to about 20,000 miles a year, and I go for a car which is practical for my day-to-day needs.
post #54 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by course9x
Some of you just don't understand what it is like living in the country (not a "country village"). You live 5,10-20 miles even from a gas station in some places. The nearest grocery store takes 20-40 min. by car in some places. Do you think riding your bike to the store is an option now????


I live only 10 min or so to the grocery store, but I know places in the ADK's in NY that people do live 20-40 min. away from getting their groceries.

Good luck getting mass transit in the forest....
say,

did someone MAKE YOU LIVE THERE?

and would you please explain why you don't want the cost of gasoline to reflect its actual global impact?
post #55 of 156
To cope with such gas prices, if you live 'in the middle of the forest', drop your obsolete 350 CI V8 and shift to a modern efficient turbo-diesel engine. Same torque output at a lower RPM (will haul anything you want), not much less power, less green house gas, and your mileage will double. If you live (as a majority of the citizens of developped countries)in town, drop the V8 too !
post #56 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by lennyblake
Not all of us live in cities with excellent mass transit systems. Some of us actually "live" in ski country. Ever try to find a bus from the country to the city?
If there is no bus, you still have other options: use a more fuel efficient vehicle, make fewer trips, ride a bike, and relocate so you don't have to drive so far.
post #57 of 156
WTFH is on the right track but not all the way to the station. And Phillipe is on the same track too.
Simply put the expanse of the "new world" has necessitated, allowed, or encouraged individual transportation. Folks just don't live densly enough to cost justify mass transit. A diesel locomotive running to the end of a fifty mile commuter line with three people on it at midnight is less efficient than three cars.

Also, a little pony may need to eat more oats to do the same job as a draft horse.
In other words I bought a van with a 3.8L V6 that got worse mpg than my previous van that had a 5.0L V8.

As the price of gas goes up people will have to re-evaluate their priorities.
I know of some friends who converted from downhill to cross country when Lift tickets went over $50 and ski/binding packages went over $500.

I used to log 50K plus miles/yr as an over the road sales person. Now selling on the net I log less than 5K from March to November and 12K during ski season.

The times they are a changin'
post #58 of 156

Buffalo NY area

$2.639 on Monday
$2.739 on Tuesday
$2.859 Wednesday evening
$2.999 Thursday morning
$3.099 Thursday evening.

That was a 24 cent increase in 24 hours! For gas that was already delivered, in the tanks, in the ground!!!! How can that NOT be illegal?

I haven't been out yet today. I'm afraid to look.
post #59 of 156
So, if you're doing 17k a year, why do you need a 3.8 or 5l van?
post #60 of 156
$2.79 100LL Av Gas, SFY.
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