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Which cardio exercise?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Running, biking...swimming?

WHich do you focus on? (Obviously, a little of everything is important).

I read somewhere that Hermann Meier bikes and only bikes. He doesn't even lift anymore. But, in my past experience, I've found running to make a BIG difference.

Any thoughts?
post #2 of 20
sex
post #3 of 20
Swimming is good for me. Works the whole body, relaxing and easy on the joints.

Best,
Chris

PS I also cycle.
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
sex
*leaves forum to go find girlfriend...*

"honey, time to train "
post #5 of 20
So when she says not tonight...
...nah never mind, I wouldn't want to read the answer.
post #6 of 20
On a more serious note, I bike a lot, skate a lot, I also have a Skier's edge for indoor cardio work and an aerobics slide I use with resistance bands for perturbance training. All because my knees and hips will not tolerate a lot of running. I suspect that Maier has some limitations due to his recent motorcycle accident and all the damage he did to his leg. If your joints can handle the running it is probably the best bang for the buck.
post #7 of 20
Running on a treadmill with elevation is my most frequent cardio. I don't know which is best but I get a better high and feel more relaxed after I run

Biking less often but I do it for my quads

Stairmaster very little but once in a while after I bike or run
post #8 of 20
I run 4 miles every single morning with the exception of the weekends. I also strength train 3 days a week with free weights. For endurance training just for skiing cause, thats all I love besides the wiff, I take the axle and wheels off of my lawn mower wagon and put 7 cyder blocks in it. Then i ratchet strap them in hook it up to my climbing harness and do laps around my yard for 1 mile 2 times a week starting september 1st of every year I could ski. What a royal pain in the ass it is but come ski season; all day long with absolutely no fatigue. Many breaks at the beggining of the month. (titanium legs) I do not run the 4 miles on the days I pull my wagon around.
post #9 of 20
There was a great article in ski, skiing, or powder magazine on Herminators training. Very complex! he bikes like 10 hours a day and they take blood throughout the day to make sure something about his oxygen levels. Sorry I can't remember but I will do my best to find it for you guys/girls!
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
I run 4 miles every single morning with the exception of the weekends. I also strength train 3 days a week with free weights. For endurance training just for skiing cause, thats all I love besides the wiff, I take the axle and wheels off of my lawn mower wagon and put 7 cyder blocks in it. Then i ratchet strap them in hook it up to my climbing harness and do laps around my yard for 1 mile 2 times a week starting september 1st of every year I could ski. What a royal pain in the ass it is but come ski season; all day long with absolutely no fatigue. Many breaks at the beggining of the month. (titanium legs) I do not run the 4 miles on the days I pull my wagon around.
damn! that's pretty intense!
you get the "I'll ski your jelly legs into the dirt, punk" award.
post #11 of 20
I mountain bike and run. This summer I have been trail running and entered a 25 km trail run that took us through 4000 feet of up and down. Now I am getting ready for a marathon on Sep 25.

Granted, this is too much running, but I wanted to complete one marathon in my life. It will take me a little over 4 hours, but time is not important. The mountain biking is still my #1 summer passion and it is an excellent way to train for ski season.

I also train with weights twice a week.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mnemosyne's lobotomy
damn! that's pretty intense!
you get the "I'll ski your jelly legs into the dirt, punk" award.
Yeah it is very intense! It is pure torture for a while. But it does get easier . Come ski season I am very gratefull that I stick with it though.

LOL that is great, do they have that award
post #13 of 20
mountain bike, long climbs with focus on working a diversity of leg and trunk muscles. this helps with strength and stamina.

mountain bike, fast descending through technical terrain. this helps with line selection, terrain reading, anticipation and balance.
post #14 of 20

?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
focus on working a diversity of leg and trunk muscles.
Trunk muscle part: expand please.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Trunk muscle part: expand please.
- SS climbing efforts using different hand positions and different finger arrangements on the grips, mostly while in a standing climb posture

- SS climbing efforts with varying position of bike beneath rider, fore/aft -- again while standing posture. this typically involves different amounts of "abdominal crunch" to maintain traction as the terrain pitch changes beneath the bike.

- conscious focus on pelvic tilt angles while doing seated pedaling

- general focus on ab tension for stability and ab relaxation (with other muscle engagement for stability) for different breathing techniques -- diaphragm/buddha belly style
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Trunk muscle part: expand please.
Trunk muscles are as followed: Obliques (waist, left and right)
Rectus Abdominus (stomach muscles)
Latissimus Dorsi (mid back)
Spinae Erectors (lower Back)
Gluteus Medius (Hip)
I think that is all. If not someone please correct me.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by huckingfellers
I take the axle and wheels off of my lawn mower wagon and put 7 cyder blocks in it. Then i ratchet strap them in hook it up to my climbing harness and do laps around my yard for 1 mile 2 times a week starting september 1st of every year I could ski..
What does your yard look like?
post #18 of 20
Rollerblading for an hour 3X a week. Greater weight bearing than biking, less weight bearing than running. A happy betweener for me. Good for coordination and balance.

I also circuit train and have now started running. Running is my fall exercise, since leaf covered bike paths get tricky in the rain while rollerblading.

I would like to do a marathon, maybe on 2006.

Barrettscv
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrettscv
What does your yard look like?
Not bad at all actually. The bottom of the wagaon is quite smooth. Like a big wheelbarrow. I turn it around drilled 2 holes through the dumping side put carabeaners(spell check) , lol, and hook my rope to it. Usually done in the early morning. So most of the time there is dew on the ground so it slides. Only noticeable marks in certain places. But I also have 5.3 mowed acres!
post #20 of 20
from skimag.com


.... Once you’ve determined your ranges, do 90 percent of your training below your anaerobic threshold (keeping your lactate levels below 2; you’re burning fat for energy and your heart rate is 110–120 beats per minute). Bergmüller calls this the “compensation level.” In the “stabilization level,” the body is still working aerobically, but lactate levels are between 2 and 4 (heart rate is 155–160 bpm) and you’re burning carbs and fat. The final phase of the training is the “development level,” an intense, carb-burning workout.

Compensation Training

<LI>3 sets of 30-minute rides (below lactate 2 OR pulse 120 at 88 to 90 revs/minute) with 5-minute stretching breaks between sessions.

Compensation + Stabilization
Stationary bike session at 88 to 90 revs/minute:
25 minutes of warm-up cycling at compensation level (below lactate 2, pulse 120)
7 minutes at stabilization level (between lactate 4 and 6, pulse 160)
5-minute break (stretching off the bike)
8 minutes at stabilization (between lactate 4 and 6, pulse 160)
5-minute break (stretching off the bike)
10 minutes at stabilization level (between lactate 4 and 6, pulse 160)
5-minute break (stretching off the bike)
<LI>25 minutes of cool-down cycling at compensation level (below lactate 2, pulse 110) Compensation + Stabilization + Development
On the stationary bike (88 to 90 revs/minute) with compensation-stabilization- development level elements:


25 minutes of warm-up cycling at compensation level (below lactate 2, pulse 120)
10 minutes at stabilization level (between lactate 4 and 6, pulse 160)
5-minute break
2 times 6 minutes at development level (pulse of 175)
5-minute break
25 minutes of cool-down cycling at compensation level (pulse of 105)
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