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Just got back from Big Sky MT

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
The family did a summer trip up there to hang out and check out yellowstone. WOW! What a great place. I really want to get back there in the winter. I heard that 250 people put down 10 million each to build a resort next door. So 250 People have access to their own resort!?!? OMG some people just have way to much money!!! A great time was had by all! I cannot wait to get back there.

http://www.skiersboard.net/forums/sh...=4122#post4122

Here's some pics if anyone wants to see them.
post #2 of 27
Nice pics! Brings back ESA memories!
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
What is ESA? Glad you liked em... good famliy time up there!
post #4 of 27
Thats the Yellowstone Club, Warren Miller is "director of skiing" there as I understand it.
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well guys When I get 10million, I will get you all passes to come up and ski there!
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j
Thats the Yellowstone Club, Warren Miller is "director of skiing" there as I understand it.
The lodge at Yellowstone is named after Warren. I'm not sure how much he is around, though. Everyone I know that's skied there has never seen him.

The ESA is the EpicSki Academy, a 4 day ski clinic organized by some of the members of this forum. Last year it was at Big Sky. This year it will be in Utah.
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdawg50
Well guys When I get 10million, I will get you all passes to come up and ski there!
Many of the residents at Yellowstone have passes and lockers atBig Sky. Big Sky offers much more terrain plus a great variety of different elevations and sun exposures......you can almost always find someplace at Big Sky with good skiing conditions.
post #8 of 27
$10 million is a bit of exageration. Property is a few million, you may have it confused with a recent article in the WSJ about the Yellowstone Vacation Club which will have a $10 million membership fee and annual dues of a few hundred thousand.

The only advantage YC would have over Big Sky is the crowds, but big sky doesn't get many people as is. I would expect to see a tram from the yellowstone base to Lone Peak in the next 5 years once the legal battles over the ownership of the peak is settled.
post #9 of 27
Nice cans on the redhead.
post #10 of 27
On The YC and things Big Sky.

Warren Miller is the director of skiing at the YC. He has a home next to the base of the Lodge Lift and skis there often.

The lawsuits about ownership of the peak were settled last year. I don't expect to see any more trams to the summit of Lone Peak. There is discussion of a chairlift and a surface lift up the Southwest side of Lone peak, near the Dakota Territory boundary. There is discussion of a lift system accessing the North Face.

The YC doesn't look like much from Big Sky, but actually has some very fine skiing. To have access to the YC, Big Sky and Moonlight Basin would give one access to nearly 8,000 acres.
post #11 of 27
Quote:
There is discussion of a chairlift and a surface lift up the Southwest side of Lone peak, near the Dakota Territory boundary.
I've been ogling that area this summer when driving to Virginia City & Ennis. Looks like a huge chunk of wicked terrain. My only concern would be SW exposure is deadly on sunny days.....there have been powder days at Big Sky where the tram becomes unskiable due to the sun turning the powder into shin deep mush.
post #12 of 27
xdog....
post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by xdog1
Nice cans on the redhead.
Thanks man lol! I think soo too!
post #14 of 27
As part of ski journalist trip in March 2001 some of us skied at Yellowstone Club: http://webpages.charter.net/tcrocker818/yclbguid.htm .

Warren Miller was there to give us a short intro speech and to socialize and answer questions. I think he skied a bit with one of the intermediate groups. He was coming off a fairly severe leg fracture (boating accident) that season.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierdon
The only advantage YC would have over Big Sky is the crowds, but big sky doesn't get many people as is.
Well, the real advantage is people there don't have to "deal" with people like us. They can happily wear their one piece suits with fur collars and carve cute parallel turns on freshly groomed corduroy.
post #16 of 27
I guess when you get down to it, all money can really buy you is isolation in all its forms...the gated community, the private ski area, the charter jet, the private rail car of days gone by, the designer fashions that scream "I'm rich and you have spinach in your teeth," the chauffered limo, the yesmen and yeswomen..


"Smithers, time to wax up the old boards...I'm headed to the Yellowstone Club"
post #17 of 27
My family skis Big Sky every year at Christmas. I scheduled a trip to see the real estate last year and ski YC but realized that I really did not want to ski an area that did not have any other skiiers so I canceled the free ski day.

Big Sky does not have lift lines during the holidays unless they have a lift problem. I remember a few years ago when a weekend day fell on the 26th. It was a beautiful day, a little fresh snow, clear roads and no crowds. What a deal - and all for something less than $10 mil!

It's strange that one of the least crowded destination areas in the country spawned an exclusive ski hill next door. Who wants to ride in chairs alone or eat lunch in an empty lodge? I like the social aspect of skiing. I like to ride chair lifts with strangers. I don't understand YC.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Who wants to ride in chairs alone or eat lunch in an empty lodge? I like the social aspect of skiing. I like to ride chair lifts with strangers.
That's one of my favorite reasons to ski Big Sky......you get to meet people from all over the nation and world (though they do stare at me with a confused look as I try to explain that the locals won't bother to drive 50 miles to ski on soft, empty. wide-open groomers and day-old crud that's lighter and fluffier than the powder most people ever see.)
post #19 of 27
Well, the real advantage is people there don't have to "deal" with people like us. They can happily wear their one piece suits with fur collars and carve cute parallel turns on freshly groomed corduroy.

Damn what a bunch of envious shitheads that some here can be.

Let me try and clarify for you.

Imagine if you will that you are Bill Gates. You have a wife and a couple of kids. There are very few places in this world you can vacation and not worry about the safety of those children. Where can you go an not be concerned about a kidnapping? The Yellowstone Club is one place that comes to mind.


It's strange that one of the least crowded destination areas in the country spawned an exclusive ski hill next door.

Not at all, SW Montana was a place that is accessable and a developer was able to purchase a 13,000 acre block of privately owned land

Yes, I would like to have a railcar full of money and try and deal with the problems that it causes. What some of you are bashing has less to do with class and more to do with tight recreational schedules, peace of mind and ease.... uh recreation.... duh!

Grow up and if you don't understand something, don't automatically assume it is because others think they are better than you.

FWIW a lot of YC members do hold Big Sky passes and do ski with you low brow sliders...
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
Many of the residents at Yellowstone have passes and lockers atBig Sky. Big Sky offers much more terrain plus a great variety of different elevations and sun exposures......you can almost always find someplace at Big Sky with good skiing conditions.
except during ESA 2005.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

bunion, you are one whacked person. why should Bill Gates or ANYONE live as you say they do? fearing kidnapping?

I say that if Gates conducts his life properly, not megalomaniacally, he has nothing to fear. but of course this can't be, as Gates is a selfish egomaniac. another azzwhype who divides "business" and "personal" as if they are divisible.

maybe you and Gates ought to start your own country. yeah, that's the ticket! :
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnarlito
I guess when you get down to it, all money can really buy you is isolation in all its forms...the gated community, the private ski area, the charter jet, the private rail car of days gone by, the designer fashions that scream "I'm rich and you have spinach in your teeth," the chauffered limo, the yesmen and yeswomen..


"Smithers, time to wax up the old boards...I'm headed to the Yellowstone Club"
gnarlito knows the deal. obviously, bunion does not.

I wonder if bunion has Gates money, or just wishes he does and imagines that some day he will. :
post #22 of 27
I would expect that sort of thought from you Gonz, you don't like Gates? I am not a real fan either, just an example. You can't see the other side of the coin is all. Black & White is the world in which you live.... what a shame...:

I wonder if bunion has Gates money, or just wishes he does and imagines that some day he will.

No not even close on either count. I do get to ski 120 days a year, look forward to going to work every day (well most days) and sleep with a clear mind.


I will chalk it up to you being an envious shithead as well.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
except during ESA 2005.
Not sure where you were skiing but I found plenty of good skiing during the ESA. Sure, it wasn't classic Montana conditions but better than many of the attendees get 97% of the time on their home mountains. The moguls over on Lone Moose were good. The empty groomers off Thunder Wolf, Ram Charger & Swift Current were a blast. The steep terrain of south wall of the Lone Mountain Bowl was very skiable and fun. Considering almost all the resorts in the NW was shut down at the time you can't complain.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunion
Imagine if you will that you are Bill Gates. You have a wife and a couple of kids. There are very few places in this world you can vacation and not worry about the safety of those children. Where can you go an not be concerned about a kidnapping? The Yellowstone Club is one place that comes to mind.
Envy is probably the last emotion I feel towards a multi-billionaire like Gates. If anything, my feelings towards the guy (not that they are that strong) tend more towards admiration for some of the things he's done with his money --helping to eradicate tuberculosis worldwide and helping to raise the graduation rate here in this country are two that come to mind -- tinged with a little pity for how little true freedom a guy like him really has and how small his real world has probably become. I mean, who do you trust for honest feedback when you're sitting on a few billion dollars?

The very rich and the very powerful are very rich and very powerful because of choices they have made. They've make their bed, and they have to figure out how to sleep in it. It's not a bed I wish to share. (That sounds pretty gay, but oh well )

After a certain point, with hundreds of thousands of people depending on him to make the decisions that allow them to continue to keep their own jobs, how much leeway does Gates really have when he makes a business decision? If he wants to leave it all behind for a week to ski at the Yellowstone Club or to rent a Greek island or do whatever he does to get down, more power to him. I certainly don't envy a person whose only recreational choices require isolation from others.

As a software developer, I can see how the total-world-domination mindset of Microsoft's Evil Empire has stifled competition. And with its continuing deployment of software architectures that are highly vulnerable to malicious attacks, Microsoft, more than any other entity, has contributed to the instability of the wired world. These are business decisions based on hubris and arrogance.

At the same time, I can much pretty work anywhere I want, for whomever I want, because of the skill set I have thanks to the dominance of the Windows operating system. Bill Gates, in his own peculiar way, has made my life easier, and I certainly don't resent him for that.

As someone who is not wealthy, I have mixed feelings toward wealth. In our country, where some people equate money with righteousness, it's hard to stay neutral on the subject. I can see the good it does. Some of my favorite places on the planet are intact because uber-wealthy individuals wanted to preserve them as personal playgrounds. The best part of the Henry's Fork river through Idaho's Railroad Ranch/Harriman State Park is intact because Averell Harriman bought it and kept people out. Similarly, John D. Rockefeller preserved the corridor that links Grand Teton and Yellowstone.

But how much environmental and economic carnage did Rockefeller and Harriman wreak elsewhere to get the money to buy these places? It's probably a zero-sum game at best.

For what it's worth, in War and Peace, Tolstoy does a great job of exploring the true nature of power and the paradox of how little true freedom or power that "powerful" men actually have.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bunion
I will chalk it up to you being an envious shithead as well.
was I that obvious?

meanwhile, in other news...

I tend to agree with the sentiments expressed in Gnarlito's lengthy post just above. ^^^^^^^
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Similarly, John D. Rockefeller preserved the corridor that links Grand Teton and Yellowstone.
Only after he was shamed into doing it because of the way he swindled the land away from the locals.
post #27 of 27
I think Gnarlito summed it up pretty well.

Another example: One of the former Prime Ministers of Israel is a member and is able toi ski at YC with much less security or impact than were he to visit your local mountain.

When I patrolled in UT. I worked a security detail with Former Vice Pres. Dan Quayle while he skied PCMR and Deer Valley. For the host mountain and the guests there those days, it was a hassle.

I spent a scant 2 months patrolling at the YC from Feb. 2002 until the end of that winter. It was an interesting experience but I did not choose to return the following winter. The Members I met were pretty normal folks and some were real down to earth. When a few here make judgements without knowing what they are talking about, I will say "bullshit".
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