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Conditioning - Recovering after ACL surgery

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi.

Just looking for tips or ideas here.

I am trying to get back to a race condition. I currently weigh 290 pounds and am six foot two. I want to get into the best possible shape for ski season (January to March) as possible.

Right now I am swimming every other day. I work out in the Nautilis room with my personal trainer twice a week.

What else can I add to this that will increase the intensity and be safe? I was thinking about running on the track. Starting with: running the straights and walking the curves until I finish two miles.

My thoughts, whats YOURS?

Best,
Chris
post #2 of 15
Swimming tends to be poor fot weight loss....
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hmmm. Did not know that. I thought it was a good exercise...

Best,
Chris
post #4 of 15
great exercise poor for weight loss....

sorry - can't find the article I remember ... it was about why so many swimmers struggle with losing weight despite huge exercise loads & what they do about it & why it happens....

try this - may help with general stuff... it is from our government sporting institute... In case you have not noticed they are especially good at producing great swimmers....

http://www.ais.org.au/nutrition/PPChangingBodySize.asp
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Interesting article.

Best,
Chris
post #6 of 15
at 6'2" 290 lbs you have a lot of extra baggage to shed... unless you're a bodybuilder or megamegamesomorph.

cycling on a regular program will help you best, that is, if you are able to ride a bicycle. I"m assuming that if you are a ski racer you should be able to ride a bike.

combine the bike regimen with a proper diet. the fitness AND weight loss will occur naturally if done properly.

when spring rolls around I find that I can shed my winter fat of 10-15 lbs (I only weigh 155 lbs) within 2.5 weeks of solid cycling and no beer or fatty foods.

I would imagine similar scalar results for you.
post #7 of 15
It's tough staying in shape with injuries.

Instead of adding more exercise, I would add intensity. Don't just swim XX laps. Swim them as fast as you can; you should be out of breath at the end of your laps, maybe do the equivalent of wind sprints in the water. I don't mind getting out of breath when I lift weights either.

Maybe it's just me, but I can't see running as being good for you knees.

Good luck, and confer with a physiotherapist before you do ANYTHING.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
I do cycle. I don't cycle as much as I used to, but I cycle about 2 miles a day. Maybe I should go up to five - or ten.

Running isn't *great* on the knees, but they need to get stronger for skiing - I guess.

Best,
Chris
post #9 of 15
Chris,

after my first ACL recon (right knee, 1985) my orthopod suggested that I quit my 5-miles-a-day running and take up cycling.

my second ACL recon (left knee, 1999) found me with a new orthopod who advised that serious cyclists are the fastest to recover from ACL recon because they already have much of the work ethic and knee mobility that an orthopod really wants from his/her patient.

the surgeon's technique only is about half the job with ACL recon. the other half is your hard work and CAREFUL selection of what stresses you subject the new ACL graft to in your activities.

I know several people who've destroyed their newly grafted ACLs by failing to do the proper rehab OR by putting the knee at risk well before the MD gave the okay.

be careful, be smart, be strong!
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
You're right, I shouldn't run long. I think I will just add more swimming and cycling.

Best,
Chris
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
Swimming tends to be poor fot weight loss....
That's because the swimmers are really floaters. O.K. maybe it has something to do with the cold water and a whale-like layer of protective blubber, but you don't see too many fat people on the swim team, and they do a heck of a lot of swimming. It's all about how hard you go at it.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Eh, do you think I can handle at the most a mile a day running? How much cycling would you suggest doing? It's starting to get cold, so I'll have to bundle up. I'm willing to do anything.

My goal is to drop ~30 pounds by January and gain a lot of muscle mass/tone up my body.

Best,
Chris
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
It's tough staying in shape with injuries.

Instead of adding more exercise, I would add intensity. Don't just swim XX laps. Swim them as fast as you can; you should be out of breath at the end of your laps, maybe do the equivalent of wind sprints in the water. I don't mind getting out of breath when I lift weights either.

Maybe it's just me, but I can't see running as being good for you knees.

Good luck, and confer with a physiotherapist before you do ANYTHING.

Actually you do better for weight loss with not such a high intensity....

So he only needs to do small amounts of high intensity for CV FITNESS & the rest at lower intensity for weight loss...
post #14 of 15
try this one & click on the weight loss one too...

http://www.ais.org.au/nutrition/HotTopics.asp
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
Actually you do better for weight loss with not such a high intensity....

So he only needs to do small amounts of high intensity for CV FITNESS & the rest at lower intensity for weight loss...
Maybe if he were running, but I still say swimming at low intensity will not loose weight and swimming at high intensity will loose it.
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