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New to racing, will I have to buy new skis? - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
sibhusky as an 18 year old J1 he should be on legal equipment whether he skis FIS or not. USSA has also adopted the equipment rules and this is not the first year they have done so. If you are going to play the game, you should play by the rules.
I wasn't arguing with the equipment issue at all. Just with the likelihood of him making the quotas for the races. I agree, he still needs his equipment to pass inspection.
post #32 of 42
Thread Starter 
I doubt I'll race much this year - that isn't my plan. My plan is to get good enough so I can race at the collegiate level next year. So, I won't be entering many races.

Best,
Chris
post #33 of 42
Collegiate skiing is divided among the NCAA skiers and the USCSA skiers. NCAA usually means it's a varsity sport, requiring males to have points in the 60's or lower. USCSA could be a "club" team at various schools. I would expect the points to be a bit higher. If you want to race collegiately, you need to find out what the requirements are to make the team. An NCAA team will be tough if you haven't been racing since you were nine.
post #34 of 42
What college are you planning on racing for? Are you looking to try to go D1, or will you be racing at a club level or D3 (USCSA) level? Racing USSA will be a great help for you. It is hard to start into the sport late - I did it a few years ago. There is a lot to learn, but it is definitely worth it. Going back to the gear thing - it was posted a few posts ago but ill reiterate it - get legal equipement for now. It doesnt have to be brand new or the best out there - especially if youre just looking to learn this year. Next year is when you should drop the big bucks on the new boards - when youre getting serious. For this year, get something easy that will inspire confidence - and that you wont be upset over them getting destroyed (learning slalom has a tendancy to destroy skis as fast as running over them with a car).
Later
GREG
post #35 of 42
Thread Starter 
Greg,

I am not sure what college I will be racing for. Do you know any colleges that have good club skiing programs and decent academia? I was looking at SUNY Binghampton and SUNY Geneseo. Both have club teams. But, I want something more intense, I think.

I am buying Volkl P60 GS 180cm and Volkl SL 165cm race stock skis off another member of this website. I am paying 450USD and 400USD, respectively.

I did race a year in high school. Those were on twin tip skis. I didn't learn much. I hope to learn a lot this year. I've decided to dedicate the next three months to getting into pristine shape for ski season...I need it since ACL surgery.

Your thoughts?

Best,
Chris
post #36 of 42
Work HARD. Coming into ski racing late in the game is HARD. You will have to be at the top of your game as a free skier, and then realize that you are once again at the bottom of the barrel. I thought I knew a lot about skiing... then I started racing at the ripe old age of 18. I have gone through tons of conditioning and training (as well as PT resulting from injuries). Lets just say that before I raced I didn't really know a whole lot about skiing - no doubt I was a very good skier - but no where near what racing turned me into. When I came to Buffalo to go to school, there was little activity on the ski team. In late december of my freshman year i took over the leadership of the team and built it up from there. We currently have a full men's and women's roster of some of the best college age racers in western NY (all the better ones are at academies and D1 schools). We have since made two national championships and three regional championships... So, the moral of the story? Those schools you're looking at will provide plenty of competition at the races - since my team is only among the top 3 teams in western NY... at the club level.

Binghampton has a better team than Geneseo (which is just above snow tubing). The last i knew, the Binghampton team was having financial/administration trouble. If you have only spent one year racing - you will not make a varsity team your first year. You will be lucky to get the coach to even look at you without having your USSA points below 60 in both GS and SL, and your FIS points somewhere in the 80's range. Ski racers spend years, and huge sums of money in preparation for college and academy level racing. The few that make it are at the top of their game after years of hard work and dedication to the sport. They work out year round, and often spend their summers skiing in Europe, Hood, or down under. One guy on my team actually went to "ski school" in Italy for a year, and is now only racing on a club team (his FIS points are in the high 70's i think).

If you want a more serious team and want to stay in western NY look at Alfred U, Cornell U, Syracuse, Buffalo, or Hobart. Those teams are essentially the best in the area. If you go to SU, I doubt you will see a "varsity" race before you graduate - I watched their top 4 guys beat everyone at Clarkson (varsity school) last season. The coach of Cornell (who I know very well) likes to find talent and I think he is hurting for skiers so you would do well on their team. The coach of alfred, while a great coach and a good guy... probably wouldn't have you skiing for him the first year unless he was desperate for a 4 or 5 seed racer. His top racer was the best in our conference last year (around 60 USSA points I think - anyone want to verify that? - I assume someone here must know who I am talking about). Matt spent his summers training in New Zealand, and graduated from an academy in Vermont... he didnt go on to "serious" competition because he was one of the SLOW GUYS.

Now, since I have run a ski team in the Empire Conference for about 4 years now, I have seen first year racers do very well. I myself have roken into the top 15 and top 10 a few times in our races. Most first timers come in about 40th to 60th though. From there it is a lot of training and hard work to get to break even the top 20. Is it worth it? Hell yes it is. When you lay down your first top 10 run you will know that your work has paid off (mine was in my second year of racing). True, its not first, but when 10 races earlier you were 35th... 10th is pretty damned good. The only problem is that as you get better, so does the competition, so you have to work that much harder. I don't want to discourage you at all, but I do want you to be prepared for what you're going to run into when you get to the hill and start racing with these guys. If you want information on the University at Buffalo I can provide it - I doubt you would make our varisty team, but you may be able to get some JV races in if you were to come here. By the time you're a freshman I suspect my UB team will rival SU for western NY dominance and depth.

Later

GREG
post #37 of 42
Thread Starter 
Greg,

Thanks for your detailed response. I wasn't aware SUNY Buffalo had a ski team as I thought there were no mountains out that way.

I thought about going to Cornell, but my chances are slim - I only have a 3.2 GPA as of now. I am about to start my second year of community college (I graduated high school at 16). If I worked extremely hard this year, I could get all A's, and improve my chances. But still, it would be very tough to get into Cornell. Maybe you have some ideas about setting me apart from the rest of the applicants at Cornell. I will listen. The only major achievements I have done since I graduated was start a philosophy club at my college.

I don't expect to be on the varsity team, I just want to train with the guys and improve my technique. Eventually, yes, I'd like to be in the starting gate. I've done a few Nastar races and I came up silver each time - if that means anything.

Best,
Chris
post #38 of 42
With only a 3.2 - Cornell will be tough... Unless you want to go for something like communications. Communications at Cornell is a whole different ball game. It is actualy subsidised by the state (yes SUNY) and has less rigorous requirements for admission than say, the hotel management school or the engineering school. It is still a difficult program to get into though. You would have to check the cornell site for more details... and make sure you hit the financial aid area while youre there, because Ivy Leagues and Ski Racing are probably the best way to rack up the largest college bills possible.

Check out UB too. We offer a lot of undergrad programs that are very highly regarded in the professional community. Our engineering school, school of management, and Pharmacy schools are just a few. Being a university with an enrollment of over 24,000 students also makes sure that there is a lot of opportunites here. As for how the Ski Team is run: It is separate from the ski club at the school and operates within the Student Association (second largest in the country). There are no cuts, and the team consists of about 30 members who train 3 nights a week together. The group of 30+/- is often broken up into small groups to run drills and such - so that everyone is on the same level in the groups - but essentially everyone trains together. The top ten (5 men, 5 women) race each weekend (chosen by the coaches and captain), and the next best few tag along to carry coats and help out on the mountain. Also, the president/captain of the team (if not racing) will be part of the group that is tagging along. Essentially what I just described is how most club teams run, but because the UB team is still young, there is more room for a non-racer to come in and earn a spot in the top 7 or 8. I currently sit between the 4 and 6 spot.

Later

GREG
post #39 of 42
Thread Starter 
Greg,

While I waiting for you to apply, I checked out UB's site. I like it!

They offer a major in both philosophy and physics, which I want to major in. They don't have a degree in neuroscience, but no SUNY school does. I can always create a major...at least most major colleges let you.

When you say there are no cuts on the team, you mean if someone signs up, you're in? What is the local mountain you ski at? Also, does the team have a web site?

Best,
Chris

PS Tomorrow, I am going to call and request an application and start filling it out.
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
I wasn't arguing with the equipment issue at all. Just with the likelihood of him making the quotas for the races. I agree, he still needs his equipment to pass inspection.
No worries!
post #41 of 42
Due to being funded by mandatory student activity fees (in part - they only make up for about 25% of the working budget for the ski team) no student can be denied access to any club/activity/event/etc that is funded by the fee. If you sign up, you are on the team. Most teams however require money for training purposes (which is about 1/3 of what most USSA racers will pay). If a student does not wish to pay for their training, they are still on the team... they just can't train. Since I now work for the student association I could talk your ear off all day with legal jargon... but it isnt that important. The training hill(s) are Kissing Brdige and Holiday Valley. This season we will most likely be at one or the other - but not both. Kissing Bridge is not much of a hill but we are able to get great coaching there, and we have a coach who is very interested in the future of our ski team, as well as other people at the area who have a strong interest in our ski team and its success. Being a young team it has taken several years for the skiing community here to take notice of the efforts that have been put in by a few of us over the past few seasons. Currently we have a good line of succession as far as leadership and talent is concerned, and we are looking to add to it constantly.
If you have further questions email me at gjrhoads@buffalo.edu
Later
GREG

BTW, you can create your own major. Also, we do not currently have a website that is up-to-date, but the information that I have provided you is much more than I would provide in an introductory email to new members of the team. If you want to get an idea of the organization that we are a part of proceed to www.sa.buffalo.edu (once school starts the site will be updated - our new web designer hasnt started yet). I am currently in charge of managing all of the club sport teams (about 25) within the umbrella of the student association (most compete against club and D3 teams just as our ski team does), as well as the CFO of an on-campus corporation catering to student needs and programming as well. So, I do know what is going on around campus... if you have any questions just drop me an email.
post #42 of 42

Greg!

What a bunch of posts! Greg, you're too much!
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