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"Controlled at the waist," Tai Chi Skiing style - Page 5

post #121 of 147
From Wigs - "I believe that you of LITTLE KNOWLEGE and master of stupidity ..." LOL - that's an great description of this fellow. Perhaps that's how you all should address him from now on - Master of Stupidity (with LITTLE KNOWLEDGE) - yes - that a great nickname.
R.
post #122 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
"To be forever a student is only a intellectual copout."

It often is one, but that is not all it can be.


Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
"At the highest level, a true master, [who is the "master" of his/her own art,] must know his/her art thoroughly, inside out. That is, from the governing/guiding principles to the applying techniques, there's no question unanswered, and above all, skillful enough to demonstrate his/her art in a pleasing elegant way."

A true master's knowledge goes way beyond that!

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
When one awakens from its illusion.

This much only is needed

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
"If a man has already met his ultimate end," he is free to be anywhere, and moves without being hindered.

A true master always serves his own purpose, which is to serve the public."

We are somewhat in agreement.
A true master serves the public not himself, even though he has free will to do as he pleases he wills not to advance himself (having no further need of advancement) but to advance others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Truth is there's no truth, only story. The question is whether or not you can complete your story with a full circle, that is, complete and consistence, and with ALL questions answered. With ALL questions answered, you would have been enlightened.


Okay, who's going to mention the coconut shell?:


Surely you can see the limited nature of such a "story". Though it is a thing of beauty and quite a useful tool not to be taken lightly, to be master of such a self-contained, consistent, true-to-itself, but also self-limiting system, is in no way being enlightened.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
A true master lives for and enjoys the moment, does not pray."


IS
A true master lives and enjoys the moment. What he lives for cannot be expressed in a physical-reality meaningful sort of way.
post #123 of 147

You cannot be serious - John MacEnroe

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiingA true master lives for and enjoys the moment, does not pray."


IS
Is someone in this ludicrous thread claiming to be a master at anything? I hope not :
post #124 of 147
No, not a master as you and I understand the term, but perhaps in a more limited sense.
post #125 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
[/size][/font][/size][/font][/color]
It often is one, but that is not all it can be.


How do you figure?

Quote:
[/size][/font]

A true master's knowledge goes way beyond that!


There's nothing goes beyond ALL/all-inclusive.

Quote:
[/size][/font]
This much only is needed

[/size][/font]

We are somewhat in agreement.

A true master serves the public not himself, even though he has free will to do as he pleases he wills not to advance himself (having no further need of advancement) but to advance others.
[/size][/font]

Okay, who's going to mention the coconut shell?


Ok, what is in the coconut shell?


Quote:
Surely you can see the limited nature of such a "story". Though it is a thing of beauty and quite a useful tool not to be taken lightly, to be master of such a self-contained, consistent, true-to-itself, but also self-limiting system, is in no way being enlightened.


Yup, nevertheless, where/what is the "limit" of the "ALL-INCLUSIVE"?

Quote:
A true master lives and enjoys the moment. What he lives for cannot be expressed in a physical-reality meaningful sort of way.


What "cannot be expressed in a physical-reality" has no "physical" attribute, what has no "physical attribute" exists only in imagination, and what exists "only in imagination" is an illusion, where a true master doesn't dwell on it.


IS
post #126 of 147
Hey, can anyone tell me how to get my posts to appear in that really stupid looking, annoying, typewriter style font?
post #127 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigs
Pretty funny your holiness!
.....
--------------Wigs
Speculations, stale and pedantic at the best.


IS
post #128 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
TCS, I came across this video link in the archives:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider

It was origninally posted by Ott Gangl in May on this Why Carving is not Skiing Thread. Anyway, I thought it looked familiar, all the banked turns without the poles, and thought you might enjoy it.


Thanks, the video clip is encoded in DivX, so it takes me awhile to figure out and view it. Nice.

Yes, no pole carved turn was a fashion in the mid-nineties (when the shaped skis just came out on the market, it is more like a marketing plot than real technique), there was an article in Ski or Skiing mag too, but it never caught on with PSIA.

I run into a demon team once. With bunch of those carvers swing in and out on a blue trial blocking the hill, they made a quite a scene. Cannot ski through their maneuvers, I traced one of the guy down, then they all stopped and watched me no pole flatboarding through intensively. They were looked astonished, guess they were trying to figure out how can I trace them without using the carved turn technique.

Extreme carving is fun, and the high G-force makes the technique challenging and exhilarating, however, the monotonous linked C track becomes pretty boring after awhile. Guess that's why the movement faded.

'later,
IS
post #129 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing

....then they all stopped and watched me no pole flatboarding through intensively. They were looked astonished...
Surpised, I am not.
post #130 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master_Yoda
Surpised, I am not.
Master Yoda, this humble jedi wants to know the meaning of the no pole flatboarder's last statement you quoted - it has caused me much puzzlement. Only through your eyes, Master Yoda, shall I find the truth - if the truth is to be found. As I have shielded my young Jedi mind with the IgnoreForce I must have missed the key to unlock this mystery

The Jewish Dragon



Aieeeeeeeeeeeee, Whoah!
post #131 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Dranow
Is someone in this ludicrous thread claiming to be a master at anything? I hope not : [/i]
Hmmm... Dranow is quoting posts he cannot see because "this user is on your ignore list". In another thread Dranow says that ignoring TCS "doesn't work, we tried that". He's been posting on this thread all along, 20+ posts so far. So when did "we try that" !? Blustering blowhard.
post #132 of 147
I fear I have already said too much, but as I am a strong proponent of the "NO FEAR" approach I will continue.
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing

How do you figure?
A man who knows 10,000 things and says he knows all, knows 10,000 things. A man who knows 10,000 things and says he is still learning knows 10,000 things. He still knows 10,000 things wether he says he is still learning or not. A man might say his answer is not good because he is still learning as a copout. Another man can give you an answer in full confidence, saying it is correct regardles of the fact that he is still learning; the learning is not relavant to the answer given.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
There's nothing goes beyond ALL/all-inclusive.
Yes, exactly! (the sound of one hand clapping)



Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Ok, what is in the coconut shell?
Oops! It seems I mentioned the coconut shell. A famous quote from a zen master that was plagairized by an oriental engineering student once. His story compared a situation to a person who had lived his entire life under a coconut shell and thought he knew everything, until one day someone lifted the coconut shell and revealed a whole world he had previously known nothing about.


Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Yup, nevertheless, where/what is the "limit" of the "ALL-INCLUSIVE"?

What "cannot be expressed in a physical-reality" has no "physical" attribute, what has no "physical attribute" exists only in imagination, and what exists "only in imagination" is an illusion, where a true master doesn't dwell on it.


IS
True knowledge is not in the imagination. Imagination is a small fenced-in backyard on the house of (rational) knowledge. True knowledge is not just outside the house, but beyond the fence.

What is commonly referred to as "reality" is just a model of the world as one knows it. Most people do not realize it, but some top level scientist do. A good scientist will realize that his scientific model of reality is a very useful tool, but one that is limited in scope.

Knowledge is not limited to rational knowledge. Many famous philosophers have reached this conclusion. We are in a delima in that our thoughts are expressed by the words they crystalize in. Our knowledge seems bound by our thoughts, and as the Beatles's song goes, "There's nothing you can say that can't be said." The first paragraph above is itself sadly subject to this condition.

Shakespear writes "There are more things in heaven and Earth Horatio than are dreamtof in your philosophy." Even though he has little knowledge of heaven. Western philosophers have tended to concentrate on the fact that our knowledge of the words we use is not all that good. Certain words in particular, like truth, knowledge itself, love, seem to imply meaning beyond what we actually can define.

Zen attempts to access knowledge beyond the rational through breaking the coconut shell. I wonder that more people do not become insane with this approach.

Many Eastern and Western religions accept certain mysteries and concentrate on actions rather than words to bring about what I will call the "lifting of the coconut shell"
post #133 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
I fear I have already said too much, but as I am a strong proponent of the "NO FEAR" approach I will continue.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost

A man who knows 10,000 things and says he knows all, knows 10,000 things. A man who knows 10,000 things and says he is still learning knows 10,000 things. He still knows 10,000 things wether he says he is still learning or not. A man might say his answer is not good because he is still learning as a copout. Another man can give you an answer in full confidence, saying it is correct regardles of the fact that he is still learning; the learning is not relavant to the answer given.


Yes, that's where/when the "integrity" of one man's words and his actions come into the play. When you say something one way, and do things the other way, (even though you are not lying,) you have built the separation in between mind and body, which makes the harmonized mind and body to become an impossibility.

Quote:
Yes, exactly! (the sound of one hand clapping)


Yes, the true sound of silence is deafening.

Quote:
Oops! It seems I mentioned the coconut shell. A famous quote from a zen master that was plagairized by an oriental engineering student once. His story compared a situation to a person who had lived his entire life under a coconut shell and thought he knew everything, until one day someone lifted the coconut shell and revealed a whole world he had previously known nothing about.


What makes you think that the "whole world he had previously known nothing about" is not a something that is also under a "shell"?

Quote:
True knowledge is not in the imagination. Imagination is a small fenced-in backyard on the house of (rational) knowledge. True knowledge is not just outside the house, but beyond the fence.


It sounded more like "imagination" in "action"--what "beyond the fence" that cannot ever be reached/touched exists only in an illusion.

Quote:
What is commonly referred to as "reality" is just a model of the world as one knows it. Most people do not realize it, but some top level scientist do. A good scientist will realize that his scientific model of reality is a very useful tool, but one that is limited in scope.


In Tai chi, the ancient Chinese metaphysics of the "world"/universe, the true reality is generated only by the "sense" of "Yin" and "Yang." "Yin" is "what can be felt" and "Yang" is "what can be seen," and the harmonized Yin and Yang makes the "whole universe"/"world". So, the criterion of the "true" reality become, can "what do you see" and "what do you feel" agree/in accord to each other.

With that said, let's take a look at the theory of the "black hole" the triumphant achievement of modern science; a "black hole" which "cannot be seen," and "cannot be touched," and ghostly exists only in the deep space, basically reaches the "limit" of the "science" or "scientific method" to "explain"/"explore" "scientifically," yes, science is limited in scope. Without mind's acknowledgement, does "black hole" exist? [Does it really exist in the deep space, or the deep space of mind?]

Quote:
Knowledge is not limited to rational knowledge. Many famous philosophers have reached this conclusion. We are in a delima in that our thoughts are expressed by the words they crystalize in. Our knowledge seems bound by our thoughts, and as the Beatles's song goes, "There's nothing you can say that can't be said." The first paragraph above is itself sadly subject to this condition.


Just because "you can say" doesn't mean it has meaning, and without knowing the "true" meaning of the words, the words generate illusions.

Based on the criterion set forth in Tai Chi, the "reality" "what can be seen" and "what can felt" can only be harmonized in "wordless," or without words, how would you grasp with "words"?

"'Wordless' world"? Is it "real" or illusion?

Quote:
Shakespear writes "There are more things in heaven and Earth Horatio than are dreamtof in your philosophy." Even though he has little knowledge of heaven. Western philosophers have tended to concentrate on the fact that our knowledge of the words we use is not all that good. Certain words in particular, like truth, knowledge itself, love, seem to imply meaning beyond what we actually can define.

Zen attempts to access knowledge beyond the rational through breaking the coconut shell. I wonder that more people do not become insane with this approach.

Many Eastern and Western religions accept certain mysteries and concentrate on actions rather than words to bring about what I will call the "lifting of the coconut shell"


When you reach the "wordless," then you can tell me "how" you lift the "shell"?


IS
post #134 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing

Yes, that's where/when the "integrity" of one man's words and his actions come into the play. When you say something one way, and do things the other way, (even though you are not lying,) you have built the separation in between mind and body, which makes the harmonized mind and body to become an impossibility.



Yes, the true sound of silence is deafening.



What makes you think that the "whole world he had previously known nothing about" is not a something that is also under a "shell"?

Nothing. (we are in agreement, even though we agree about nothing )


Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
It sounded more like "imagination" in "action"--what "beyond the fence" that cannot ever be reached/touched exists only in an illusion. "

You can't even get there by going out in the backyard and climbing the fence. The route is through the hearth.
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing


In Tai chi, the ancient Chinese metaphysics of the "world"/universe, the true reality is generated only by the "sense" of "Yin" and "Yang." "Yin" is "what can be felt" and "Yang" is "what can be seen," and the harmonized Yin and Yang makes the "whole universe"/"world". So, the criterion of the "true" reality become, can "what do you see" and "what do you feel" agree/in accord to each other.

With that said, let's take a look at the theory of the "black hole" the triumphant achievement of modern science; a "black hole" which "cannot be seen," and "cannot be touched," and ghostly exists only in the deep space, basically reaches the "limit" of the "science" or "scientific method" to "explain"/"explore" "scientifically," yes, science is limited in scope. Without mind's acknowledgement, does "black hole" exist? [Does it really exist in the deep space, or the deep space of mind?]



Just because "you can say" doesn't mean it has meaning, and without knowing the "true" meaning of the words, the words generate illusions.

Based on the criterion set forth in Tai Chi, the "reality" "what can be seen" and "what can felt" can only be harmonized in "wordless," or without words, how would you grasp with "words"?

"'Wordless' world"? Is it "real" or illusion?



When you reach the "wordless," then you can tell me "how" you lift the "shell"?


IS
Sorry, you have to deal with your own shell; mine isn't really there.
post #135 of 147
I looked at the video with the big turns and the 360s. Controlled skidding is nice and useful sometimes, like the last 10 meters skidding towards the bar, and I use it to let beginners get their first taste of a sliding turn, but I would never teach them to use the arms as horizontal rotating weights to start their turns, and neighter would I teach them to have these enormous weighttransitions back and forth.. ever, there is no need for it.
And 360 are very nice to get the weight positioned right on the skis if you do at least a full 360.. On the video it looks more like a chicken way out when the position is lost and the skier cant get down to the fall-line. Turn up instead and do a 270 to find the fall-line.
I would never imagine a skier spend a whole day making worm turns, but very well as a sort of pastime.
And this is what this video feels like to me. A fun thing to do now and then..
post #136 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Swede
I looked at the video with the big turns and the 360s.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Swede


Thanks for reading my video, not sure which one you are referring to, but I'd assume it is one,
http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/ski_v_is_freeskiingl.wmv
correct?

Yup, fun way to ski it is. It got spins (I'll tell you why it is not a 360 in a minute), which makes skiing in-and-out of backward skiing a snap, short swings, long turns, and etc., basically, it is "figure skiing" dancing on the slope. Nevertheless, it also doubles as a martial art training.

At higher level, a martial art training not just trains for physical techniques, but mental awareness, as well as the body and mind coordination, etc., and so is Tai Chi Skiing.

Quote:
Controlled skidding is nice and useful sometimes, like the last 10 meters skidding towards the bar, and I use it to let beginners get their first taste of a sliding turn, but I would never teach them to use the arms as horizontal rotating weights to start their turns, and neighter would I teach them to have these enormous weighttransitions back and forth.. ever, there is no need for it.


You lose me on this one. What "skidding," "sliding turn," and "enormous weight transitions back and forth" you are talking about?

Quote:
And 360 are very nice to get the weight positioned right on the skis if you do at least a full 360.. On the video it looks more like a chicken way out when the position is lost and the skier cant get down to the fall-line. Turn up instead and do a 270 to find the fall-line.


The reason I simply call it as "spin" and not 360 is because, as a freeskiing maneuver, a spin may exit at any angle, where 360 is unnecessarily rigid requirement. If you do a full 360 spin to turn 360, most likely you'd overshot the intended direction. And yes, turning 270 gives a better lead-time and smooth recovery.

Quote:
I would never imagine a skier spend a whole day making worm turns, but very well as a sort of pastime.


Yup, after jumping too much in the terrain parks, this changing of pace is quite relaxing.

Quote:
And this is what this video feels like to me. A fun thing to do now and then..


There's more skiing than that meets the eyes in Tai Chi Skiing. Tai Chi Skiing is not just about developing skiing techniques to deal the ever present but hidden and highly changeable gravity, but also about developing the mindsets/mentality to see into the "realm of skiing" so a deeper meaning of "skiing" may be found.

External techniques of Tai Chi Skiing/flatboarding is developed based on the simple fact that the skis/boards turn when the edge is pressed and run straight when the base is pressed, and verified with Newton's mechanical theories,
http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/ski_prin_tech.html.

Nevertheless, how internal body moves to match/balance the external gravity is all Tai Chi, which is explained fully here,
http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/ski_dance.html.

Is the skiing just an idle pastime, a tool/skill for adventure, or a probe for the true reality--gravity, the ultimate mystery that science would/will ever face? How far would you go?

Have "fun" figuring out,
IS
post #137 of 147
If I moved my arms around like that my race coach would have kicked my ass. Keeping your arms up and forward and still keeps the rest of your body forward and makes it easier to put pressure on the front of your boots and initiate turns. Of course that is to say nothing of the very narrow stance you use. I too would like to see a video on steeper terrain I think your technique would fail you there.
post #138 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Yup, fun way to ski it is. It got spins (I'll tell you why it is not a 360 in a minute), which makes skiing in-and-out of backward skiing a snap, short swings, long turns, and etc., basically, it is "figure skiing" dancing on the slope. Nevertheless, it also doubles as a martial art training.
Mmm, I could call it a spin then if I loose an edge and spins some degrees..


Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
At higher level, a martial art training not just trains for physical techniques, but mental awareness, as well as the body and mind coordination, etc., and so is Tai Chi Skiing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Right, agree.. as I remember from my ju-jutsu-traing, and army training.
But skiiing is skiing and not martial art, as little as programming or skiteaching is.



Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
You lose me on this one. What "skidding," "sliding turn," and "enormous weight transitions back and forth" you are talking about?
There definitely are no carving or jumping turns, as I can see, so its skidding or sliding whatever is the right english name for it. And Im supposed to master that too if Im going to get that ISIA status.. But in the second or third turn, just after the fallline as I remember (I didnt bother to look at it twice) the shoulders hips are somewhere 4 inches forward of a vertical line from the boots to the shoulders, but from the legs position, it looks the weight of the shoulders are a loong way back.. To initiate a skiding turn on soft snow like that a good skier would need just one inch of movement, you should hardly be able to see it on a video filmed at this distance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
The reason I simply call it as "spin" and not 360 is because, as a freeskiing maneuver, a spin may exit at any angle, where 360 is unnecessarily rigid requirement. If you do a full 360 spin to turn 360, most likely you'd overshot the intended direction. And yes, turning 270 gives a better lead-time and smooth recovery.
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
If you need to recover on that kind of snow.. naa..


Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Is the skiing just an idle pastime, a tool/skill for adventure, or a probe for the true reality--gravity, the ultimate mystery that science would/will ever face? How far would you go?
How far will you go with that technique? Iv got the IVSI status and an national championship in speedskiing. I was a crosscountry racer whan I was 5. Iv done telemarking and long distance (weeks) back country ski hiking, and Iv got lots to learn still. But to me, what Iv seen so far of your Tai Chi-skiing its a one way road into some sort of syntetic skiing.

But have fun on the slopes, thats the most important thing..
post #139 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyder79
If I moved my arms around like that my race coach would have kicked my ass. Keeping your arms up and forward and still keeps the rest of your body forward and makes it easier to put pressure on the front of your boots and initiate turns. Of course that is to say nothing of the very narrow stance you use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyder79


Yup, to hold your arms low and steady is a PSIA model of skiing/teaching, however, ski without poles, Tai Chi Skiing uses arms/fingers tension, (not movements,) to enhance the balancing of gravity. Actually, the arms are "not moved" but a passive/slave movement that is attached to the core movement, for the [a purpose of] minor adjustment of the body's internal pressure/Qi, which is transmitted to feet to ski. In Tai Chi, it is called, "moving without moving."

The narrowest stance gives the skier maximum/best mobility for the hip rotation, which provides the skier better ability to make maximum hip's side displacement. And a large side displacement of the hip/butt makes the ski tracks to travel rounder and the line of the butt (CoG) moves straighter, so to make the skiing smoother and faster. And when you have your weight/balance balanced on the center of gravity (CoG), it doesn't where your hands/feet are, for the body is already balanced. Tai Chi Skiing is skied with such a balance, it is called "balance on the flight," or "dynamic balance."

Quote:
I too would like to see a video on steeper terrain I think your technique would fail you there.


Guess that most people here would like to see it fails, interesting! No, it hasn't failed yet, would you like to provide a film crews to see your prediction through?


IS
post #140 of 147
I don't buy the narrow stance thing. From your video's it looks like you are in the backseat quite a bit of the time. If your feet are that close you won't be able to get your hips to far out because you will be hitting your boots together and booting out at an even shallower angle than if you used a slightly wider stance. If you want to refute that post a vid with some serious lean angle where we can see that boot together stance you use. That stance is good for pulling flat turns but not for carving. Your "flatboarding" cracks me up too, anyone can point them straight down a green or easy blue and go straight. There is no skill in going straight.
post #141 of 147
Trolling for business .... he will do anything to promote this.
post #142 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Swede
Mmm, I could call it a spin then if I loose an edge and spins some degrees..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Swede


A few degrees don't make any difference in freeskiing, the question is can you terminate the spin at the desired direction and make a smooth, continued exit.

Quote:
Right, agree.. as I remember from my ju-jutsu-traing, and army training.
But skiiing is skiing and not martial art, as little as programming or skiteaching is.


Well, if you only mean the punching and kicking and fighting techniques, no, that is not it, those are only a fighting skill.

"At higher level, a martial art training not just trains for physical techniques, but mental awareness, as well as the body and mind coordination, etc., and so is Tai Chi Skiing."

Quote:
[size=3][size=3]

There definitely are no carving or jumping turns, as I can see, so its skidding or sliding whatever is the right english name for it. And Im supposed to master that too if Im going to get that ISIA status.. But in the second or third turn, just after the fallline as I remember (I didnt bother to look at it twice) the shoulders hips are somewhere 4 inches forward of a vertical line from the boots to the shoulders, but from the legs position, it looks the weight of the shoulders are a loong way back.. To initiate a skiding turn on soft snow like that a good skier would need just one inch of movement, you should hardly be able to see it on a video filmed at this distance.


You must be talking about the one when the skier drove the skis down backward on the fall-line, "to demonstrate his superb controllability and maneuverability of skiing in a difficult spot," yup, you missed that too.

And I don't carve or jump turn if I don't have to, as "there is no need for it"; a good skier can always find/ski a line that makes using those techniques unnecessary.

Quote:
[font=Times New Roman][font=Courier New]If you need to recover on that kind of snow.. naa..


No, it only means to recover (straighten) from the spin.

Quote:
How far will you go with that technique? Iv got the IVSI status and an national championship in speedskiing. I was a crosscountry racer whan I was 5. Iv done telemarking and long distance (weeks) back country ski hiking, and Iv got lots to learn still. But to me, what Iv seen so far of your Tai Chi-skiing its a one way road into some sort of syntetic skiing.


All skiing are synthetic skiing; however, since Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese philosophy/practice that pursuits/finds the true nature of our existence/life and returns to it--be one with the nature--so is the Tai Chi Skiing practice.

By "Tai Chi" it means to push beyond limits, so Tai Chi Skiing is pursuing the total/whole skiing, it goes beyond all the synthetic skiing and the artificial titles and ranks.

Quote:
But have fun on the slopes, thats the most important thing..


Fun it is; however, like all other Tao/Zen disciplines in the Orient, Tai Chi Skiing is also practiced as a moving meditation.

"From sport to Kung-Fu, from Kung-Fu to meditation, Tai Chi Skiing has transformed the alpine skiing to a discipline that is capable of bringing us to reach the heart of gravity where the universe shines. As Tai Chi Skiing transposes, the universe manifests from within. Tai Chi Skiing is the dance of the Cosmos."

Have fun,
IS
post #143 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyder79
I don't buy the narrow stance thing.


That's your prerogative, however, "don't buy" doesn't make a valid argument.

Quote:
From your video's it looks like you are in the backseat quite a bit of the time. If your feet are that close you won't be able to get your hips to far out because you will be hitting your boots together and booting out at an even shallower angle than if you used a slightly wider stance. If you want to refute that post a vid with some serious lean angle where we can see that boot together stance you use.


Backseat may be a taboo for your PSIA skiing/teaching, however, there's no such a hang-up in Tai Chi Skiing/freeskiing, and backseat is the only way to ski backward properly.

And here's a photo for your "some serious lean angle where we can see that boot together stance you use,"
http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/ski_p_is_rideski.jpg

Quote:
That stance is good for pulling flat turns but not for carving. Your "flatboarding" cracks me up too, anyone can point them straight down a green or easy blue and go straight. There is no skill in going straight.


So you think that "carving" is THE technique for skiing? Can't agree with that, do you know why they customarily call the "Downhill Skiing," which is straightlining on flat boards, the "King of the hill" in Europe?

And for the modern skiing, do try to ski the skierX trial sometime, that again the main techniques is flatboarding, and methinks that's more exciting and challenging skiing than carving.

'later,
IS
post #144 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
[/color]
All skiing are synthetic skiing;
The skiing I did in the army wasnt a bit synthetic, it was pure martial art..
post #145 of 147
http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/ski_p_is_rideski.jpgIf you call this serious lean angle I can see why you like the easy runs so much, but then again if you don't like carving you won't really see good lean angle. Have fun with whatever it is you do on skis.
As for the skierX trial. They are very good skiers and of course they run on flat skis as much as possible. There is less friction when you are on a flat ski and therefore you can achieve a higher top speed. Personally the X games are a lot of fun to watch but if I had to choose I would go with a more traditional alpine event to compete in. Thats why I raced SL, GS, SG, DH for 10 of the 23 years I have been skiing. Now I would rather hit a nice powder run that scare myself silly prejumping downhill bumps at 65 mph.
post #146 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Swede
The skiing I did in the army wasnt a bit synthetic, it was pure martial art..


So, adding a proper/synchronized breathing, you'd be Tai Chi Skiing?

Curious though, did they train you shooting rifle or submachine gun while you're doing downhill skiing?

'later,
IS
post #147 of 147
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyder79
http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/ski_p_is_rideski.jpgIf you call this serious lean angle I can see why you like the easy runs so much, but then again if you don't like carving you won't really see good lean angle. Have fun with whatever it is you do on skis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyder79


Actually, I didn't "lean," the body remained comfortably upright/perpendicular to the slope, as always.

Racers may need to carve to follow the line depicted to them; nevertheless, in freeskiing, the skier chooses his/her own lines, and a good skier can always find/ski a line that makes using extreme carving unnecessary. A carve turn may look gun-ho, but properly executed parallel turns are more versatile, and elegance.

So the question is why carve when you don't have to?

Quote:
As for the skierX trial. They are very good skiers and of course they run on flat skis as much as possible. There is less friction when you are on a flat ski and therefore you can achieve a higher top speed. Personally the X games are a lot of fun to watch but if I had to choose I would go with a more traditional alpine event to compete in. Thats why I raced SL, GS, SG, DH for 10 of the 23 years I have been skiing. Now I would rather hit a nice powder run that scare myself silly prejumping downhill bumps at 65 mph.


There you go. My main interest in skiing has always been Chinese Downhill, aka the whole mountain skiing, where everything goes; I don't emphasize/concentrate on carving any more (I carved until 2001, where/when I started to drop-in into terrain parks and ski flat board).

You too, have fun,
IS
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