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Epiphany

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I have had a problem falling asleeep since high school. I am now 33. I would be tired throughout the day, and wide awake during the night. I have tried various things to help relieve my prob. I have tried Ambien (which is wonderful short-term), Melatonin (same), and other medicines or herbal remedies. I bought a Select Comfort (Sleep Number) bed, cut out caffienee (I used to drink Mtn. Dew like no tomorrow), bought one of those egg-carton mattress pads, got an olde-fashioned clock that actually clicked. I am also a stroke and brain tumor survivor, and that probably does not help the issue.
Anyway, I tried this new remedy last night (and yesterday) that helped more than any of the other things listed. I did not fall asleep immediately, but I slept soundly, and I am awake this morning. My body feels rejouvenated, and I can go throughout my day without feeling drained. You ready for this? I drank more water (ding!ding!ding!). I never knew I was dehydrated. I would just go throughout my life without drinking enough fluids, and not worry too much. A couple of times, while riding my bike or skiing, I had been so dehydrated that I have thrown up. But I thought that that was because I was exercising, and that those were isolated events. Duhh! *smacks self*! I never knew! And no Dr. had diadnosed it. There, I feel better.
post #2 of 22
dehydration is a mean one, BP.

contact lens wearers are lucky, they get "early warning" on dehydration in the form of that nasty sensation when your contacts feel like they're made of carborundum or diamond grit.

there's also the "pee test" where you aim (pun intended) for clear or near-clear color every time you micturate. or pee, if you like the non-MD phrasing.

dehydration is the leading factor in the "hangover" too.

it's a mean mo-fo and I bet you feel good getting the upper hand.

congratulations on peaceful nights, it's better than good.
post #3 of 22
You made a good discovery. Another one would have to do with that tired in the daytime stuff...if it's really bad mid-afternoon then suspect the effects of eating high on the glycemic index.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
I also live in Colorado, where it is incredibly dry. I should have known sooner. I feel is if I should have a Camelback bladder installed somewhere permanantly on my back. Better than a tattoo, IMHO. Gonz, I know, from experience, the effects of a hangover, as do most of us. I guess we can even learn when we are innebriated.
post #5 of 22
jstraw

What is glycemic index. I crash every day at about 4:00. It sucks and limits my ability to work and play. My sleep is also poor.
post #6 of 22
I don't want to start a cab thrash, that's not what this is about but basically...certain foods contain more simple carbohydrates than other foods. If your diet leans away from proteins, vegetables with low-sugar content and complex, whole grain products in moderation and toward a lot of refined flour, potatoes, rice, sweet fruits and juices and the poison of poisons refined sugar and corn syrup you're basically on a blood sugar roller coaster. You're blood sugar has big peaks and valleys. You metabolize symple carbohydrates rapidly and when they're out of your system you're running on empty and bottom out. Fats, proteins and other foods low on the glycemic index metabolize slower and convert to energy at a steadier rate. A diet that doesn't rely on coninually resupplying quickly converted and burned blood glucose has a greater capacity to stabilize your energy throughout the day.

I'm a non-insulin dependent, type II diabetic and when I shifted my diet, I dramatically stabilized my blood sugar and virtually eliminated the afternoon blahs. I also completley eliminated any occurances of hearburn. That's just an anecdotal curiosity since I don't really know what's going on with that.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thank you for clarifying that post JStraw. I had the same questions that Paul Jones had. My Aunt is diabetic too, but she does not talk about it much, so it is hard to understand the terminology.
post #8 of 22
It's really not a diabetic thing...it just sort of matters more to diabetics.
post #9 of 22
yes but you have it a bit twisted... pears are very sweet but low GI.... ditto apples....

Also SOME rices are fine - Doongara rice was especially bred here in Oz for diabetics - has a low GI like basmati rice does....

Also wholemeal is not really different in GI to white flour.... eating grain stuff is better... better still a slow fermented bread like Burgen bread (we have it here in a few grain versions or a muesli one) or a true sourdough

pasta is "white" but made from semolina not flour.... so the starch particles are less disrupted hence lower GI

Carrots do NOT have a low gi from memory - but it does not mean much as they have little carbohydrate anyway....

Do not fall into the high fat version of "low GI" - that does NOT help diabetics who have issues with lipids & cardiovascular system anyhow

If you want good reading try jenny brand-miller's book
recipes are good

GOOD low GI snacks are stuff like sweet corn, baked beans, chick peas, low fat popcorn, yoghurt, low fat milk, fruit(preferably non tropical... stone fruit is usually good) - bananas not too ripe is good....
post #10 of 22
I'm a flat-out low-carber but as I said, I didn't wanna start that thrash. So I'm juts about off the GI scale with my diet...which has led to some of my misinformation. Thanks for the correction.

Tell me how fruit that is loaded with sugar can be low on the GI. That confuses me.
post #11 of 22
Jack straw

I tend to binge on carbs. I am trying to loose weight but find my attraction to cookies and processed stuff to be a real problem. I am not diabetic - I am the opposite.

The fatigue thing is probably a tick issue or a tisey fly or some residual vd. There is also cronic fatigue syn or fibromyalgia - women's diseases, too in touch with my feminine side.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
Tell me how fruit that is loaded with sugar can be low on the GI. That confuses me.
There are other factors involved beside sugar. Acidity for example. Citris fruits are low GI despite their natural sugar. Whole grains have different GI values depending on how much they are processed (smaller particles and more cooking leads to higher GI values).

The result is that it is not alway easy to predict the GI value of particular foods.

There is a good book, "The Glucose Revolution," that includes the actual GI results of a number of foods in scientific tests.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifer
There are other factors involved beside sugar. Acidity for example. Citris fruits are low GI despite their natural sugar. Whole grains have different GI values depending on how much they are processed (smaller particles and more cooking leads to higher GI values).

The result is that it is not alway easy to predict the GI value of particular foods.

There is a good book, "The Glucose Revolution," that includes the actual GI results of a number of foods in scientific tests.
Thanks for the pointer. I need more edjamacation since I'm I'm contemplating a shift from low-carb to low-G.I.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lifer
There are other factors involved beside sugar. Acidity for example. Citris fruits are low GI despite their natural sugar. Whole grains have different GI values depending on how much they are processed (smaller particles and more cooking leads to higher GI values).

The result is that it is not alway easy to predict the GI value of particular foods.

There is a good book, "The Glucose Revolution," that includes the actual GI results of a number of foods in scientific tests.

I think you will find that is one of jenny Brand-Millers.... she is at uni NSW I think... anyway one of the sydney ones
post #15 of 22
get Jenny's book....

Our diabetes educators were using it...

I made the muesli cookies for the diabetic patients & they like them because as long as they are sensible (1 or 2) then blood sugar did not really vary
post #16 of 22
I'm on the see food diet.
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski
I think you will find that is one of jenny Brand-Millers.... she is at uni NSW I think... anyway one of the sydney ones

Sorry. I should have completed the reference. My copy of the Glucose Revolution lists four authors including Jennie Brand-Miller as the lead. The others are Thomas M.S. Wolover, Stephen Colagiuri and Kaye Foster-Powell.

For the record, I'm not a diabetic but I am insulin resistent. My body's insulin reaction to high GI carbs is way overboard. I think it is from years of eating a high carbo diet in lieu of fats to control dietary cholesterol. When I switched to a low GI diet a few years ago it made a remarkable difference. No more intense food cravings an hour or two after eating and the afternoon fatigue went away too. I have never had much of a problem controlling my weight but I was able to shed some of those last stuborn pounds eventhough I had increased my consumption of monounsaturated fats (primarily nuts and olive oil). My doctor suggested the dietary changes--he called it a Mediterranean Diet. I haven't done a close comparision but it seem consistent with what I have heard of the South Beach Diet.

I do miss breakfasting on a stack of pancakes slathered with maple syrup.
post #18 of 22
I have one question and I'm not trying to be smart ass. Didn't you feel thirsty? I often wake up in the middle of the night strictly do to thirst, get up have a drink and back to bed. Depends on how much fluid loss in the day, salty or garlicy/spicy foods or alcohol consumption, lack of fluid intake but I feel thirsty and it wakes me. Do you ever feel thirsty or is that mechanism sort of disegaged for you?
post #19 of 22

sorry this is so digusting

I had a different kind of dehydration problem years ago (symptom was back trouble). I had no recollection of being thirsty before hand and had not really noticed "excess" color in my urine. But I did drink 1-2 sodas/day and ate too much food (another symptom of not drinking enough). Nowadays, I've trained myself to drink more water. I'm still rarely thirsty. Paying attention to volume and color of my urine helps me monitor for correct water intake during "stress" conditions (e.g. outdoor exercise in hot humid conditions). For example, if you drink a lot and you are still not peeing or you pee a little but it is dark colored, you are not drinking enough.

One caution about drinking water though. Here in the DC area, we recently had a person die from drinking too much water. The person drank 3 gallons in a couple of hours and died because the salts/electrolytes in the blood dropped below a critical level. Although 3 gallons seems excessive, I've come close to this walking a full round of golf in extreme heat/humidity.
post #20 of 22
As a percentage, Water is one of the most toxic chemicals to us.

Sure a small amount of "poison" will do us in, but we run around with a little "poison" all the time. If you get double your normal "poison" level, you likely won't even notice.

Water, well, that's what we are. It takes a lot, but get off by 10 or 20% and you go into shock.

Strange but true trivia.

;-)

And yes, I too often wake in the night just to "change water" . It's the thirst that wakes me. I keep water on the window sill over the bed. gulp gulp!
This 2 liter waterbottle on my desk gets emptied every day. It still is not enough.
I do sweat heavily with activity.

CalG
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by L7
I have one question and I'm not trying to be smart ass. Didn't you feel thirsty? ?
It is said that by the time you feel thirst---you are already dehydrated---under most circumstances, mildly so---but dehydrated non-the-less.
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j
It is said that by the time you feel thirst---you are already dehydrated---under most circumstances, mildly so---but dehydrated non-the-less.
I have heard that and it is often a mantra used on the way to imbibing many refreshing beverages.

I guess the thirst mechanism would kick in at different levels of dehydration for different people.
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