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Roxy launches ski division

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
According to this article , Roxy, a subsidiary of Quicksilver, will launch 'Roxy Ski, a new division with a full line of alpine ski products designed specifically to meet the style and physique of women.'
'Roxy has teamed up with major ski brand, Dynastar (a division of Rossignol,) to create truly functional ski technology for women. Roxy Ski marks the first major joint project between Roxy parent company Quiksilver and Group Rossignol.'
'Developed in the Chamonix, France region, the debut collection of skis, bindings, poles and boots combines the highest quality in technology with Roxy attitude: fun, lively, daring and confident. The collection reflects the spirit of Roxy with vibrant florals and playful polka dots providing a wide range of product to skiers of all proficiencies.'

It bothers me more than it should, as I have an irrational weakness for Dynastar. I've some of my best skier's memories on dynastars.
I guess they will use Dynastar technology, put Roxy labels and build the skis in china... That's progress I guess. But who'll make the (polka dotted) boots ?
post #2 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
According to this article , Roxy, a subsidiary of Quicksilver, will launch 'Roxy Ski, a new division with a full line of alpine ski products designed specifically to meet the style and physique of women.'
'Roxy has teamed up with major ski brand, Dynastar (a division of Rossignol,) to create truly functional ski technology for women. Roxy Ski marks the first major joint project between Roxy parent company Quiksilver and Group Rossignol.'
'Developed in the Chamonix, France region, the debut collection of skis, bindings, poles and boots combines the highest quality in technology with Roxy attitude: fun, lively, daring and confident. The collection reflects the spirit of Roxy with vibrant florals and playful polka dots providing a wide range of product to skiers of all proficiencies.'

It bothers me more than it should, as I have an irrational weakness for Dynastar. I've some of my best skier's memories on dynastars.
I guess they will use Dynastar technology, put Roxy labels and build the skis in china... That's progress I guess. But who'll make the (polka dotted) boots ?
philippe:

I too have a weakness for Dynastar (although I don't think it's all that irrational, I love the way their skis ski), but this doesn't bother me all that much.

Dynastar made some pretty impressive strides last year in women's skis with the development of their Exclusive Legend line. Other than K2, they seem to be the only manufacturer that really has looked seriously at designing skis specifically for women. Based on comments I heard last year from some very good female skiers, the Dynastars definitely had something going for them.

I think the development of a women-oriented line of equipment is a healthy thing. For much too long, women have had to adapt to gear that was primarily designed for men. This sounds good to me.

Vive le difference.
post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I think the development of a women-oriented line of equipment is a healthy thing. For much too long, women have had to adapt to gear that was primarily designed for men. This sounds good to me.
Sounds good to me too, no question about that. But here we're more dealing with 'badge-engineering'. Nothing new of course, it has been done before by other brands and it goes with the take over of Rossignol. But they didn't even try to pretend that Roxy's imput will go further than a flower deco ! Those guys has no shame.
I guess I'm just too conservative here. I like my dynastars with a blue-white-red deco...
post #4 of 28
But do they have to insist on putting flowers on things for women? I mean not all of us think skis should have flowers (or polka dots)! It's a total turn-off for me.

I liked the Phat Luv when I tried it, but told the K2 rep there was no way I was wearing a ski with flowers on it. I don't want to look like a three year old when I ski! And in general I don't care what skis look like. I skied a pair of Fischer Weapons years ago and they had camo and bullets on them and were an embarassment to be seen in as well. But the graphics weren't bright, so I was able to convince myself that no one was really looking at them. But neon green with purple hibiscus is another thing!
post #5 of 28
The graphics on the Exclusive Legend are attractive but not flowery. It's also an awesome ski.
post #6 of 28
I also have some sort of weakness for Dynastar and it´s very rational: the owner of the company representing and importing Dynastar, Lange, Look, Cebe, Colmar,... Prince rackets,... Trek bikes,... is a good friend of mine and I have been preparing their catalogs and manuals since maybe 1997.

I have wittnessed the developments of women´s skis and the care taken to introduce and promote them. Dynastar, now also Rossignol are besides K2 leading companies in the ladyski sector.
A week ago I spent several days over the Dynastar catalog writing the Czech version. As most catalogs, it contains little technical info a lots of marketing babble (forgive me Ullr I did the same in our language - it´s business and my daily bread, you know, I also need the dough... ), especially after their technical manual ceased to exist or be delivered, but it´s enough to see that there nothing Exclusive (the pun intended) or really special in the women line. Just the standard "lady" stuff.
Otoh, I also heard what Bob P. writes: a lot of ladies like the skis. They must be be good and maybe better than ladyskis of some other brands. Maybe just nicer or better marketed.

Watching the emphasis the Dynastar and Rossi people put on their Exclusives, Saphirs, Exhibitions, or Divas and considering the boom of women-specific ski gear the new Roxy skis are no surprise for me.

There will always be women skiers who hate pink skis, polka dots, flowers and similar kitsch attributes of lady-specific skis.
The concept of raised heels is highly debatable. While there are tens of posts here on "how to decrease the ramp" all women get persuaded that a built-in stiletto heel is a must for them.
Otoh, softer skis are good and in general trend.
There are also different skis for M and F in racing.

All in all, I think that about 75% of what lady skis are is pure marketing but why not? If they attract more women to the slopes and mountains they served one of their pursposes.
post #7 of 28
Checkracer, you see no conflict or tradename confusion, then, between Roxy and Roxa?
post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
But do they have to insist on putting flowers on things for women? I mean not all of us think skis should have flowers (or polka dots)! It's a total turn-off for me.
I also totaly hate the deco on K2 'factory' skis (Seth Pistol, Public Ennemy etc...). And I suspect it would prevent me to buy one of those (provided I don't love them very very very much after a demo). I wonder how many people are similarly strongly turned-off by such a bold look, vs how many are attracted enough to buy a K2 rather than an another ski. I don't really care either for the look of a ski, but the K2 design is really too much for me. Is such an extreme design good marketing ?
post #9 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky
I skied a pair of Fischer Weapons years ago and they had camo and bullets on them and were an embarassment to be seen in as well. But the graphics weren't bright, so I was able to convince myself that no one was really looking at them. But neon green with purple hibiscus is another thing!
sibhusky,
You´d be cute with Seth Pistols!

Btw, we had a similar discussion with the Germans. The webmaster and me ("I" for the nitpickers but it´s the last time, you know now that I know) wrote that we wouldn´t mind using skis with some absolutely ladylike graphics - just for fun...
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
I also totaly hate the deco on K2 'factory' skis (Seth Pistol, Public Ennemy etc...). And I suspect it would prevent me to buy one of those (provided I don't love them very very very much after a demo). I wonder how many people are similarly strongly turned-off by such a bold look, vs how many are attracted enough to buy a K2 rather than an another ski. I don't really care either for the look of a ski, but the K2 design is really too much for me. Is such an extreme design good marketing ?
You´d find a discussion on this, maybe December 2004.

Comprex:
I don´t know. I suppose there are similar problems from time to time but I don´t know if Roxy vs. Roxa is a conflict legally.

I heard that there was a conflict because of Atomic Beta Carv 9.11 vs. Porsche Carrera 911 resulting in renaming the ski to 10.11.
post #11 of 28
Off topic, but the K2 graphics are extremely important for selling to younger skiiers who don't want the boring graphics of race skis. I think 4FRNT has the best graphics this year, cool yet clean. Others that are nice are Volkl Mantra, Armada ANT and the Dynastar Pro Rider always looks good.
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
I also totaly hate the deco on K2 'factory' skis (Seth Pistol, Public Ennemy etc...). And I suspect it would prevent me to buy one of those (provided I don't love them very very very much after a demo). I wonder how many people are similarly strongly turned-off by such a bold look, vs how many are attracted enough to buy a K2 rather than an another ski. I don't really care either for the look of a ski, but the K2 design is really too much for me. Is such an extreme design good marketing ?
As I said in another thread, my extremely conservative husband liked the Public Enemy but didn't buy it because of the graphics. Since he doesn't ski much it probably made economic sense as well, except that he doesn't like waiting in lines for things and, unlike myself, has saved his money for years (read tightwad) so he has plenty to play with. I told him they make contact paper covers for skis (do they still do this?) and that was the only way he would have bought them.
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
Dynastar made some pretty impressive strides last year in women's skis with the development of their Exclusive Legend line. Other than K2, they seem to be the only manufacturer that really has looked seriously at designing skis specifically for women.
Well I would be the one to mention this, but Volant started making female specific (Vertex models) skis in the late '90s. I'm not certain of all of the design differences, but I'm guessing they used a softer steel cap (though the '06 line doesn't), they also had shorter turn radii (sp?) and the '06s do too. I bought a pair of '00 Vertex Supercarves for a friend who's going to take up skiing, and they were quite buttery in the tip, much more so than the men's version. They certainly weren't all dolled up to look pretty though.
post #14 of 28
That roxy logo makes me want to puke, but I've seen their bikini catalogs and I'm not complaining.

As a rule I don't really factor graphics into my ski purchase. If I love the way a plank skis, then I'm buying it. (Though I would have to get a black belt in "I'm-gonna-kick-your-ass-if-you-make-fun-of-me" before I skied on something pink with unicorns and cream puffs floating in a sea of rainbows and rose petals, but you know what I mean.)


And I think the really girl graphics may be a shot by roxy to bring more females to the sport. I know a lot of girls who'd be put off by the graphics, and many who would be attracted to them. Roxy does surf and some snowboard stuff, so why not skiing.
post #15 of 28
Prior just announced a new woman's ski, pretty nice sleek graphics I think. It's a news story on www.biglines.com front page right now.
post #16 of 28
k2 female lines is good, i like their graphics.
PEs et el can stay with the i think im kool gang.
roxy = bimbos = more bimbos on slope
is that a good thing? you decide
post #17 of 28
"Dynastar technology, put Roxy labels and build the skis in china" dude check your facts before you post crap...
the roxy skis are made in france(chamonix to be precise) as i have 4 pairs looking at me right now i might have an idea where they came from...
RE: womens skis in general, for better or for worse(some would say WORSE) the ski industry is ruled by grumpy old european men whose opinion of women skiing is slightly higher than the taliban so in the past all the womens skis were redecked/repainted short mens/junior skis. it really has only been maybe the last 6-7 years where boots and skis have taken into account womens physiology and technique(thanks in no small part to people like Ms. Thoren) the leaders in this are dynastar/rossignol and K2, everyone and i mean everyone else is playing catch up.
in an industry in decline (as high as 25% down in dollars last year) any new blood/hype/gossip/buzz that gets new skier out is a good thing...
post #18 of 28
Aside from the nostalgia factor, who really cares? I'm willing to bet 85%+ of our ski purchases are putting money into the hands of just 3 corporations/conglomerates. I'm sure this has been posted before, but for those who haven't seen it it's pretty interesting.

The Big 3 (How Our Industry Breaks Down)

K2 Inc.
K2 Skis
Volkl
Marker
Ride
Liquid
Marmot
Tubbs
- Note: K2 owns many more companies, but those are the relevant ski/snow sport manufacturers.

Amer Sports
Atomic
Volant
Salomon
Bonfire
Arc'teryx

Quiksilver
Roxy
The Rossignol Group
- Rossignol
- Dynastar
- Look
- Lange
- Kerma

All information courtesy of Oct. 2005 Freeskier Magazine.

If it makes you feel any better, this type of consolidation is certainly not limited to the ski industry (which I'm sure most of us realize).
post #19 of 28
why does everyone always forget Dynamic when they list amers stuff?

don't forget Gnu/Libtech and maybe Bent Metal in quiksilver
post #20 of 28
Yeah, I saw those in the list but left them out b/c: a) I've never heard of Dynamic (let the flaming begin!), b) I was under the impression Gnu got out of the snowboard business a few years ago, and c) the Pats & Raiders were busy running up my fantasy pt. totals like the gas pump at Mobil this morning!
post #21 of 28
point taken...
post #22 of 28
There were predictions by some insiders that there would be only about six main companies in ski business. Until recently it seemed that the consolidation somehow wasn´t there.
Now with the latest changes it´s almost where it should be according to the visions mentioned:
K2, Amer, Quiksilver, Fischer, Head, Nordica + Elan, Blizzard and some smaller ones.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waxman
in an industry in decline (as high as 25% down in dollars last year) any new blood/hype/gossip/buzz that gets new skier out is a good thing...
I agree. The industry is desperately trying to sell at least about 4.5 million pairs of skis while in the best part of the 80s there were as much as 8 million sold.
The introduction of shaped skis was nice and has helped some but the switch is mostly over.
Anything which can help is welcome.

Btw, wouldn´t it be somewhat schizofrenic to be exstatic over better and better skis and at the same time critical about the companies doing what they do?
post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by waxman
"Dynastar technology, put Roxy labels and build the skis in china" dude check your facts before you post crap...
the roxy skis are made in france(chamonix to be precise) as i have 4 pairs looking at me right now i might have an idea where they came from...
It was tongue in cheek, dude, some prospective thinking about the next step if you want : Now, badge-engineering, later, Rossignol factory in Spain, later again, factory in China... You may note that the PR guy said 'developed in the Chamonix région', not 'made'.
I know where Dynastar skis are made : In Sallanches, 15 miles west of Chamonix.
Now, how do they look ?
post #24 of 28
Waxman,

Volkl has made a women's specific core construction since 2000 (something K2 cannot claim), and they have over 30% of the women's market...I wouldn't say they are 'playing catch-up.'

Regarding K2's flowery women's graphics, they are so dominant in women's right now it would be crazy to change anything. Depending upon which industry audit you read, they have 40-50% of the women's market.

As of year end 04/05, Dynastar had about 5% of the women's specific market - something that will certainly change with the marketing power of Quicksilver/Roxy.
post #25 of 28
Graphics are really important. I purchase my skis and boards based solely on the topsheet. Performance and construction doesn't mean a thing....
post #26 of 28
My local ski shop owner told me that what he is seeing at the ski shows and hearing from the ski reps is that the ski-binding integration trend going forward is for complete integration: skis, bindings, boots, poles, ski jackets, ski pants, gloves and helments. It will be a complete package from head to toe.

Salomon started this with their cross-max stuff: I saw one guy completely decked out on his Crossmax 10s with matching boots, poles, helmet, etc. THe ski hill had 300 ft of vertical drop!
post #27 of 28

4th & long...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiNut
My local ski shop owner told me that what he is seeing at the ski shows and hearing from the ski reps is that the ski-binding integration trend going forward is for complete integration: skis, bindings, boots, poles, ski jackets, ski pants, gloves and helments. It will be a complete package from head to toe.

Salomon started this with their cross-max stuff: I saw one guy completely decked out on his Crossmax 10s with matching boots, poles, helmet, etc. THe ski hill had 300 ft of vertical drop!
Just like the snowboarder decked out head to toe in Burton gear, Salomon and the rest of the bunch are doing us a huge favor by attempting to dominate an individual skier...Nothing says PUNTER like the head to toe fashion!
post #28 of 28
Never been a fan of Dynastar, though I do own a pair of Legend 8k's that have yet to ski.

HUGE fan of the young hardbody models that Roxy uses, so it can't be all bad.
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