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Earthquake in Montana

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Last night just after 10 p.m. just as we were settling in with our bedtime books, the windows rattled and interior doors trembled. It felt like a poltergeist had passed through the house. My daughter called from Bozeman with the news that the strange sensation had been a 5.6 earthquake in the Pioneer Mountains north of Dillon.

At the H Bar J Bar in nearby Wise River, the proprietor said, "It shook our beer up, but it's settling down." Whew!
post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
Last night just after 10 p.m. just as we were settling in with our bedtime books, the windows rattled and interior doors trembled. It felt like a poltergeist had passed through the house. My daughter called from Bozeman with the news that the strange sensation had been a 5.6 earthquake in the Pioneer Mountains north of Dillon.

At the H Bar J Bar in nearby Wise River, the proprietor said, "It shook our beer up, but it's settling down." Whew!
Save the beer! Been through a couple when I lived in California. Strange sensation.
post #3 of 26
I hope everyone is safe.

I only experienced 1 earthquake in my life. I was on a bridge in Montreal. It was not very a very strong quake and bridges are made to flex a little anyway. But I would hate to be in a building when a strong one comes. Damn scary stuff.
post #4 of 26
Strange times! I actually felt a very slight one in NJ a couple of years back. Glad to hear the beer's OK
post #5 of 26
We've had a couple here. Most recent woke me up about 1:00 AM. I felt the bed shake and thought the St Bernards were roughhousing downstairs. Only found out about the earthquake on NPR when I woke up the next morning.

I understand that the largest fault in the country is somewhere down by the Illinois-Missouri line.
post #6 of 26
Last nite at 10:06 I was in that part of sleep just before the dreaming starts. The first wave woke me up. The tremor continued for maybe 20-30 seconds. My first quake and I have to admit it scared the hell out of me. To the folks who live in CA. not on your life would I live there. Freaky stuff.
post #7 of 26
I can't figure out why I didn't notice it. I was at work showing a new person the ropes in another apartment (my job is in-home supported living for the disabled). When I returned to the apartment where I usually work, the woman I care for was freaking out saying that the whole building shook. Well she is schiztophrenic, and often comes up with imaginary terrors, and the kids upstairs tend to like to jump and down a lot, so I didn't think much of it, but then a another staff person came in and asked about it. I was barefoot when it happened, but I didn't feel it at all, neither did the woman I was orienting. I guess I was absorbed in my work!
post #8 of 26
Nolo,

Great news! That means the mountains are getting taller. I know, only a ski bumm would look at it that way.

I have been through numerous quakes on Guam and in L.A. No matter how many you go through you just can't quite get use to em. I describe my time in L.A. as surviving 5 earthquakes and 1 L.A. Riot.

Bunion,

You describe it well. That first bang that woke you up is the P (pressure) wave. That travels fastest and is what woke you up. It was followed by the S wave that causes all the shaking. The time between the two is used to calculate how far away the epicenter is. Those first quakes do get your attention. You never forget your first! :
post #9 of 26
Here is a link to USGS Montana Earthquake.
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqinthenews/2005/usazad/

From what I can see not very common in that area.

MTT
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
You never forget your first!
Yes, and you never again think of terra as firma either.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
Yes, and you never again think of terra as firma either.
Tell me about it. My first was the Loma Prieta ("World Series") earthquake in 1989. I was less than 5 miles from the epicenter. I'm one of those people who "sense" an earthquake before it arrives. I was in the doorway of my office before it hit, grabbing friends who were confused and forcing them into the doorway. I had about 10 seconds. Then, watched stuff jump around my office, and a few things crash to the floor. Nothing major there.

We lost a 40,000 gallon water tank on the hill. Fortunately, it went down the other side of the hill or it would have flooded the building. We didn't lose any systems (once we finally got them re-booted). It was pretty amazing. My 20 minute commute took almost 2 hours that night.

Six months later, we were living in Colorado...!
post #12 of 26
I remember the same thing happening in Georgia. My wife and I had watched the restored and remastered version of The Exorcist the evening of April 28, 2003. Around 5:00 a.m., I woke up to my bed shaking and the dog freaking out. Now in Georgia, the first thing that comes to one's head when you awake from a sound sleep and your bed is shaking is not an earthquake. Having had some previous suspicions, I surmised that my wife was possessed and was shaking the bed to get my attention. It felt as if the whole episode was a dream until I actually got up later and learned that a 4.9 magnitude quake had ocurred in Fort Payne, Alabama.
post #13 of 26
It's not that far from Yellowston NP. Remember the quake in like 1958. It was a real serious shake, mountains collapsed and people died. Yellowstone is a volcano or so they claim which is why the earthquake occurred.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square
You describe it well. That first bang that woke you up is the P (pressure) wave. That travels fastest and is what woke you up. It was followed by the S wave that causes all the shaking.
What's the S stand for? Shaking?!
Or Sine?

We don't get much in the way of earthquakes here, as we have our very own tectonic plate. However there are faults within it and they cause the odd tremor. I've only felt one, when I was a kid.
post #15 of 26
The midwest's main quake threat is theNew Madrid fault, running through New Madrid, Mo. The last big one was long ago. That's ok. It caused the Miss. River to temporarily run backwards, created Reelfoot lake in Tenn., rang church bells far away, and brought down some forests. Didn't kill very many because they weren't yet around to get killed. Other minor faults throughout the Midwest.
post #16 of 26
I was down in Bozeman for this, as my daughter is starting at MSU next month. I was in a hotel downtown.

Anyway, was laying watching TV just after 10 PM and the bed started shaking. It felt at first like those "Magic Fingers" beds they had when I was a child where you fed the quarter in and the bed would shake. Well, I'm turning around looking for the old coin slot when the tremor changed and now there was this wavelike sensation, like someone was under the bed trying to get out!!!! I leaned over to make sure that this wasn't the case. By that time it had all stopped, but I then realized what it was and called home to let my husband know about the excitement and text messaged my daughter to see if she had felt it. She hadn't, but they had evacuated the dorm she was in.

The next day, one of the parents from California said her daughter was coming to MSU to get away from earthquakes.
post #17 of 26
Thread Starter 
Good news for Montana skiers:

Quote:
Western Montana is earthquake country, but the frequent quakes in the area are usually moderately sized, like Monday's quake that was centered 13 miles north of Dillon, says a Montana State University geologist.

"That's why we have young, rugged mountains. They are lifted up one quake at a time," David Lageson told a room full of people at MSU Thursday. Lageson, head of MSU's Earth Sciences Department and an expert in tectonics and rock-faulting, said western Montana has "a whole lot of little faults rather than one big one like the San Andreas fault."
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
What's the S stand for? Shaking?!
Or Sine?
S = Shear wave. (I had to look it up.)
post #19 of 26
nolo, did the animals act up right before the quake?
post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
I don't know about before, Lucky. We were all bedded down for the night. But afterwards there was definitely some bellowing.
post #21 of 26
Read USAToday for 8/8/2005. for better info on New Madrid quake. I wasn't really making it up after all.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
Last night just after 10 p.m. just as we were settling in with our bedtime books, the windows rattled and interior doors trembled. It felt like a poltergeist had passed through the house. My daughter called from Bozeman with the news that the strange sensation had been a 5.6 earthquake in the Pioneer Mountains north of Dillon.

At the H Bar J Bar in nearby Wise River, the proprietor said, "It shook our beer up, but it's settling down." Whew!
I was sitting on my couch playing the FIFA 2005 soccer video game and I thought it was just the stadium getting crazy from my team's incredible ball-handling and shooting skills. :
post #23 of 26
Hey T-Square PM me about Guam.
I was there in '78 for a 5.5. My Chief and I were in the Anderson Airforce Base Exchange shopping for Noritake China for his wife. Imagine being in the Fine China and Crystal Dept. during a quake that had all the samples dancing accross the shelves and crashing onto the floor. Hear the roar and rumble first, thought a B-52 was landing on the roof.
post #24 of 26
I spent time on Guam almost 20 years after you (1995-96) doing technology work. Missed the quakes, though... Also missed the 747 crash that just missed a friend's house up on the mountain...
post #25 of 26
I experienced a 5.9 in Santiago, Chile last August. Cool as hell, shook the bed and made the curtains wave.
post #26 of 26
felt one in vermont a few years ago!!!!
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