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Got my new boots! having some issues though :(

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

Got my new Tecnica Diablo Flame boots a few weeks back. While i was 'wearing them in' around the house I noticed that the front part of my right foot was a bit numb. Didn't take too much notice of this because around the house is very different from hammering down the slopes.

So, last Friday I spent the day skiing. The only problems occurred in my right boot, the left one was very comfortable. Had the little bit of numbness pretty much all day. After about 5 hours of skiing I started to get this pain in the right hand side of my heel, just below my ankle, almost where the heel starts to become the sole of the foot.

By 4pm, it was very very painful and I had to stop skiing. The next day it was still sore and after that it was gone.

I took the boots back to my ski shop and they re-heated them for me and I put them on for about 30 minutes while pushing a lot of pressure into the heel to make sure they are moulded correctly and we didn't miss anything the first time.

I don't know if this will do anything or not. The arch of my right foot seems to be a little bit higher than my left foot. Does anyone think this calls for footbeds?

Can you wear a footbed only in one boot or would you have to put them in both boots?

cheers
post #2 of 29
I had a similar problem with my Technica's, and they still aren't right. I gave up and went back to my old boots.

I had a very similar heel problem, it went away and seemed fine. Each time I wore them this happened, reguardless of work that had been done on them. I tried the Technica's one more time at the end of the season and it happened again, only this time it did not go away, and still hasn't completely. It turns out that I have a bruised and strained Achillies tendon. Unfortunately, with the shoulder injury (not ski related), I have been unable to use crutches and have not been able to give it the total rest it requires. The shoulder is on the mend, now it's time to focus on the foot.
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
That's not good!

Did you have the problem with both boots or just the one like I am having?
post #4 of 29
Blue

These are Hot Forms right. You may need to pad - on the skin or on the sock to help make a little extra room where the pressure is.

Make sure you get the boot real hot. I kept mine plugged in while the boot was on my foot. If you still have pressure in that spot then grind it.

You can re-heat, but it's important to get it right now because the heating elements break. Once you start skiing the boot the elements will probably not work like they do now.

You can do the same thing in the front part. Pad the area to make more room then re-heat.

You do have custom foot beds, right.
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
No they aren't the hot form ones.

At this stage I don't have custom foot beds, everyone keeps telling me that you shouldn't get foot beds until the liner flattens out a little bit. I think the problem I am having could be related to the foot beds though, I think I need them to align my right foot correctly.
post #6 of 29
I think if you're getting foot beds you need to get them made and fitted at the same time as the boot. Obviously they take up a little space and will change the way your foot sits in the boot.
post #7 of 29
Blue,

I'd suggest you get them now. But it would be good to hear from others on this.

You need a boot fitter. I bet they are hard to come by down there.

When I was at Whistler for a season, I met this Austrailian girl. She had purchased her boots down under. When she showed up for her first day, her first lesson, the instructor had to tell her that her boots were on the wrong feet.

Who sized your boot?
post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 
The dude at the ski shop who fitted them was pretty good. He spent a lot of time with me going through all the info etc. He was the one that said my right foot appears to have a bigger arch than my left. I actually went to 4 shops and spent a long time trying on boots etc, this guy was streets ahead of the other boot fitters.

He didn't want to dive straight into using foot beds without first making sure that I really needed them, to try and save me the extra expense.
post #9 of 29
Dear SB,

I'm sure you'll hear from others too, but I think you should get the footbeds now. You spent a pretty penny on those cool boots and it protects your investment to buy the footbeds. And you can take them w/you for the next pair of boots. Amortized (sp?) over the life of the footbeds they are relatively cheap.

Put them in both boots of course! You do not need to pack out the liners first.
post #10 of 29
every skier should have footbeds in their own boots
post #11 of 29
Should the position of the arch support change with forward inclination of the boot?
post #12 of 29
Soliderblue I can relate to your fitting problems. All I will say is be patient and keep going back to a fitter you trust. It took me three seasons to finnally get a fit that fits. And of cource resource the great advice from this great site. Good luck.
post #13 of 29
I would get the footbeds now.
I would also expect to go back a few more times for fine tuning.
It will be worth it in the end. I hope the shop's not too far from home.
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoldierBlue
The dude at the ski shop who fitted them was pretty good. He spent a lot of time with me going through all the info etc. He was the one that said my right foot appears to have a bigger arch than my left. I actually went to 4 shops and spent a long time trying on boots etc, this guy was streets ahead of the other boot fitters.

He didn't want to dive straight into using foot beds without first making sure that I really needed them, to try and save me the extra expense.
Footbeds are not a panacea. They can help, but only if they are built by someone who really understands how the foot works and what the footbed needs to do to optimize the fit and performance.

That said, I admit to being surprised that the fitter re-heated the boot to try to fit the heel area. That seems like a weird attempted solution. If I understand where you're feeling the pain, there's not a lot of liner or padding in that general area. I would be looking for seam shape and other possible irregularities in the liner before anything else.

A footbed will dramatically change the position of your foot in the boot, as well, and so will likely require a re-forming of the liner at that time.

Don't live with the pain! Keep going back until they get it right!
post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Should the position of the arch support change with forward inclination of the boot?
Hey, comprex!

It depends on what you mean. I believe that the arch support should leave room for functional (partial) flattening of the arch during pronation (the movement of the foot which occurs when that foot is the outside one during a turn on skis). Back in the day, the footbed was often built up so that there was no movement of the arch allowed. This seems to me to remove a lot of the functional of the foot, and I would not recommend that kind of a footbed.

It is important, however, that the footbed be formed with the foot in the approximate position it will be in while in the boot. This needs to take into account ramp angle, forward lean, and also the angle of the foot fore to aft.
post #16 of 29
Hello, ssh.

Yes, it seemed a little too easy just to switch footbeds among different boots, and forward lean was probably the most easily noticed difference I could point to. Thanks!
post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
OK, Thanks for the advice everyone!

I will suss it out and see about getting the footbeds. The only problem is that I have a 12 day ski trip planned in less than 2 weeks. I am a little concerned that I won't get this right and will lose valuable ski time!
post #18 of 29
Footbeds in Oz can be pricey, yes, and sometimes they don't do what they're meant to. If you want to fiddle before opting for a few hundred on foodbeds, pop into the chemist and see what they've got in the Dr Scholl display. There's an amazing variety of do it yourself footbeds available nowadays. You could experiment with some of those (not too radical ones) and see what happens, and then you might be better equipped to decide on what is needed.

I got custom footbeds made up with my last boots although was iffey about them as they were made seated, but they pushed my foot down onto them. They were no good, and I've gone back to using my Podiatrist-made plastic ones. My feet slide with those, so I'm going to the chemist to get something to stop that.

I reckon when you're having doubts, fiddle.
post #19 of 29
adendum: to test your boots before that trip, don't walk around the house in them.

Get yourself a thick bit of foam (or an old pillow or something) and stand in them on the foam. You'll roll and rock around, same as when skiing. Watch TV or do the ironing. That is as close approximation to skiing as you'll get... if you wanted to go crazy, make up a balance board and do it on that.
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
ant:

thanks muchly for that info.

prices I have been getting for footbeds here are about $100. I will check out the chemist first and see if I can get a cheaper alternative.
post #21 of 29
$100 is cheaper than the ones I got!!! I knew they were going to be iffey, but they'd given me a great deal on the boots and were insistent that they understood my foot issues. Sadly, they didn't.

The Dr Scholl alternative means you can see if arch-support/foot stabilisation works or not. Being in your boots and rolling around on an unstable surface will have your foot behaving like it does when skiing, so you can test it out before hitting the slopes.

Putting the foam on a balance board would be the ultimate test!
post #22 of 29
It really is a shame that it's so difficult to find those who are clueful about truly balancing skiers in/on their equipment. In some ways, it's not that hard if one makes the focused effort to learn about it. But, most "boot fitters" don't even know the value of being balanced...

I say all that simply to communicate that if you can find someone who understands skiing as a sport of balance in motion, you'll be a good deal of the way there...
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
what i might do is call a "professional" boot fitting company and ask their opinion about the problem i am having. they might be able to give me a better explanation for it all and they may recognise the symptoms.

once i get their opinion i might move on from there and look at the alternatives.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom
....You do not need to pack out the liners first.
Whether you Need to or not....most will pack out some. Blue...as mentioned, get the footbeds to at least address any alignment/balance issues.
Good bootfitters are the skier's best friend....Best of Luck ...
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Got the footbeds today, foot feels like it is better aligned inside the boot. Haven't got any numb feeling with the right foot. Am heading up the slopes for a day next Thursday to give them a proper test.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoldierBlue
Got the footbeds today, foot feels like it is better aligned inside the boot. Haven't got any numb feeling with the right foot. Am heading up the slopes for a day next Thursday to give them a proper test.
Hooray! HOpe it works for ya; Keep us posted..
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Should the position of the arch support change with forward inclination of the boot?

The footbed should support the foot function I would have thought... so the forward inclination of the boot should be suitable for the foot/footbed combination ... otherwise tail would wag dog...

It would be like me telling a patient to bend legs to fit the crutches had
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant
Footbeds in Oz can be pricey, yes, and sometimes they don't do what they're meant to. If you want to fiddle before opting for a few hundred on foodbeds, pop into the chemist and see what they've got in the Dr Scholl display. There's an amazing variety of do it yourself footbeds available nowadays. You could experiment with some of those (not too radical ones) and see what happens, and then you might be better equipped to decide on what is needed.

I got custom footbeds made up with my last boots although was iffey about them as they were made seated, but they pushed my foot down onto them. They were no good, and I've gone back to using my Podiatrist-made plastic ones. My feet slide with those, so I'm going to the chemist to get something to stop that.

I reckon when you're having doubts, fiddle.
I just stuck mine in my ski boots because my achilles did NOT like reverting to footbed now it has been on the new orthotic....

JOY.... although I must try to get podiatrist to make a full length one because it is a bit strange being on the liner only at the front.... hmmm maybe I could cut up some old shoe liner stuff to make the front section?
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by HaveSkisWillClimb
Whether you Need to or not....most will pack out some. Blue...as mentioned, get the footbeds to at least address any alignment/balance issues.
Good bootfitters are the skier's best friend....Best of Luck ...
From my experience footbeds do NADA to correct alignment issues... they are not even corrective for the feet really... just fill up space a bit....

If you have real alignment problems see the podiatrist & physiotherapist (preferably BOTH together at a sports med clinic) & get them to sort out all the body/foot stuff first.... THEN see the bootfitter to finish tweaking the boot/binding stuff
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