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new skis for my buddy

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
My friend is in need of new skis. He presently is on a pair of Rossi Viper - maybe six years old. They look practically new! He is not good in powder, bumps or generally nasty stuff. He's 49, 145lbs and about 5'6". I do not know the level system but he can ski steep stuff with no bumps. He is always willing to try new ideas to improve but he does not coach easily.

He keeps his skis together even though I told him to open up. He seems to have a hard time pressuring the tips. He doesn't know what to do with his poles! But overall he is not as bad a skier as I just painted. He loves to ski and we have been friends 'since we was kids'.

I know his boots are an issue as well. They seem so stiff for a rec. boot. But that is another topic. Please give me some ideas as to help my light weight intermediate skier find an appropriate board.

It's all East coast skiing for the most part.
post #2 of 25
Nordica SUV 10's are an easy turning ski, light weight, and they can hold an edge. Might be just the thing for your friend. I see you're from Troy, NY. Goldstock's sporting goods sponsers a Nordica demo day at Gore every season. You can also call Peter Froust at Goldstock's, they have a demo program at their store.
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks Drifter,

I know that shop. I usually work with Darrell at High Adventure, Latham. Goldstocks is a great shop, but for some reason I just don't tend to go there except for their summer sale. There summer sale is great.

SUV is a good place to start.

More please!
post #4 of 25
Atomic Metrons. They are heavy but hold well on hard snow. Lure your friend into a lesson. He will thank you for it later.
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider
Atomic Metrons. They are heavy but hold well on hard snow. Lure your friend into a lesson. He will thank you for it later.
I will say again, (other than the B5) the Metrons are NOT heavy. The Neox is what creates the weight. Have him check ebay for 9's or 10's.
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Metrons eh!

Are they a super side cut ski or be they a mid-fat? Either way I bet you'd go small or short for a guy his size and weight. Metrons always appear to be cumbersome in nature. The shovel seems so large, if you know what I mean. He'd learn how to carve - do or die!
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I will say again, (other than the B5) the Metrons are NOT heavy. The Neox is what creates the weight. Have him check ebay for 9's or 10's.
It doesn't matter if skis are heavy in the parking lot as long as they don't ski heavy. Nordica Top Fuel are a perfect example.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
Metrons eh!

Are they a super side cut ski or be they a mid-fat?
They be BOTH!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
Either way I bet you'd go small or short for a guy his size and weight. Metrons always appear to be cumbersome in nature. The shovel seems so large, if you know what I mean. He'd learn how to carve - do or die!
He will go short, in the 150-158 range. They will tackle ALL the terrain he is looking to do.
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
Heh Drifter

I just stopped at Inside Edge. They had some stuff but nothing jumped out at me.

We were on the way home from dropping my little girl at Lake George for camp. She's 14 actually.

My wife was with me. She hardly skis, but I'm quite sure she likes to visit ski shops with me in the summer.
post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 
Phil

I like the shortness. It would be good for him to learn how to ride the edge. Still a little concerned about the girth of the shovel. He's not that powerful.

But is really would make sense.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
Heh Drifter

I just stopped at Inside Edge. They had some stuff but nothing jumped out at me.

We were on the way home from dropping my little girl at Lake George for camp. She's 14 actually.

My wife was with me. She hardly skis, but I'm quite sure she likes to visit ski shops with me in the summer.
Was it Camp Chingnacok? Inside Edge is a good shop, my favorite in Saratoga is the Alpine Shop.
post #12 of 25
PJ: I'm just your pal's size and have one day (last March) on my 152 Metron 9s, plus some demo'ing. The "cumbersome" shovels don't affect your skiing except to help you float over the crud & chop. Great edgehold and they feel plenty quick to me. They will widen his stance and make him carve. I can't wait for December. Dr. Phil P. converted me.
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
Drifter

It was. When we dropped her at the cabin one kid looked "like a deer in the headlights". I wanted to give her a hug and tell her everything was going to be ok. I wasn't allowed. Hell she hardly allowed me to hug her! I hope they have a blast.

I went there 35 years ago. Pretty much the same, except the kids seem better behaved.
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Silver

How well do you ski? He really is not that bad a skier. He's just 'flat', you know, not dynamic - holding back, not fluid or rythmic or athletic. I know there's a break through around the corner.

Metrons could do the trick. I could see that.
post #15 of 25
PJ: I'm a pretty solid 8 for an old guy, don't do bumps.
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
I'm embarassed to say: level 8 means nothing to me.
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
Phil

I like the shortness. It would be good for him to learn how to ride the edge. Still a little concerned about the girth of the shovel. He's not that powerful.

But is really would make sense.
Don't worry about the shovels. After a couple of times getting the edges hooked up, he'll be addicted. You'll just have to worry about him parking and riding all the time--and skiing way faster than you on the groomed!
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
I'm embarassed to say: level 8 means nothing to me.
Dynamic parallel is available at times, but likely you'll still see a stem and some forced rotation on some turns. Can get down most anything, but doesn't necessarily handle nastier conditions well...

Does that help?
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
ssh

It does, and that sounds like him. There is way too much sliding going on, but he has experienced the carve. He just can't seem to stay with it. It seems that once you carve it would be like riding a bike - the feeling of carving is something that gets under your skin and 'calls you back'. That hasn't seemed to have happened yet.

He has that fear of skis pointing straight down the hill when crossing over in a turn. He doesn't let his CM move off his feet very much. That's because he's not carving.
post #20 of 25
Phil,

I've looking for either a mid-far or a pure powder ski. I've already got a set of Atomic C:9's (2 seasons old) for the front side. I've been mostly a midwest skiier until the past few years where I've been taking multiple trips per year out west, and I'm considering moving to Denver so that I can get 30+ days a year. I don't know whether I should shelf the C:9's for good and pick up the more versatile Metron, or get a fat twin tip / powder ski. I've never really had the chance to ski off piste until the past 2 winters, and I'm dying to go off trail. Unfortunately my current equipment won't take me there.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forrester
Phil,

I've looking for either a mid-far or a pure powder ski. I've already got a set of Atomic C:9's (2 seasons old) for the front side. I've been mostly a midwest skiier until the past few years where I've been taking multiple trips per year out west, and I'm considering moving to Denver so that I can get 30+ days a year. I don't know whether I should shelf the C:9's for good and pick up the more versatile Metron, or get a fat twin tip / powder ski. I've never really had the chance to ski off piste until the past 2 winters, and I'm dying to go off trail. Unfortunately my current equipment won't take me there.
I think there is a question there, but I am not sure . Either way, SSH could probably answer it better since he lives in the region that you are thinking about heading it.
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
ssh

It does, and that sounds like him. There is way too much sliding going on, but he has experienced the carve. He just can't seem to stay with it. It seems that once you carve it would be like riding a bike - the feeling of carving is something that gets under your skin and 'calls you back'. That hasn't seemed to have happened yet.

He has that fear of skis pointing straight down the hill when crossing over in a turn. He doesn't let his CM move off his feet very much. That's because he's not carving.
I would expect getting on a pair of hypercarve skis like the Metrons would be a bit disconcerting until he gets the confidence to put it on edge. But, once he does... Hello!
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forrester
I've never really had the chance to ski off piste until the past 2 winters, and I'm dying to go off trail. Unfortunately my current equipment won't take me there.
First, let me comment on this: your C:9s can take you there just fine. They won't be ideal, but remember that we skied all kinds of snow on pencil skis for decades. Don't let equipment rule your sense of what you can and cannot do. Certainly, great equipment can help, but less-than-ideal equipment can challenge you to really tune in your technique, which is more valuable in the long-run.

That said, I found my Metrons ideal for skiing in-bounds in Colorado last season. I could go from a powder morning to a crud-filled afternoon or an overnight ice rink to superb sugar snow without even thinking about changing skis. The b5 is, as has been mentioned multiple times here, a very beefy ski. That is not to say that it isn't a great all-around ski, just that it responds best to a strong hand (er... foot). The 11 may be a bit more all-around for many recreational skiers, and the 10 is a crowd pleaser across a wide range of skiers.
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
First, let me comment on this: your C:9s can take you there just fine. They won't be ideal, but remember that we skied all kinds of snow on pencil skis for decades. Don't let equipment rule your sense of what you can and cannot do. Certainly, great equipment can help, but less-than-ideal equipment can challenge you to really tune in your technique, which is more valuable in the long-run.
True dat!!! The right ski model for any individual can only enhance the skills they already have. They can help a skier improve quicker, but they don't perform magic.
post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
UPDATE

Just left High Adventure. He picked up a pair of m10 I think. It was a choice between an 11 or the 10. They did not have the 9. So he got the 10s in a 150 or so. Remember he is 150 lbs and not that tall. He is an intermediate.

He also got a nice pair of Dalbellos. Much better flex and he down sized from 26.5 to 25.5. Flex and fit seem much improved.

I hope to hell this works out ok for him. I think it will be great!
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