or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Help for all us Newbies - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowball
Good deal. I ski mostly off-piste and love the way my Chubbs smash through Crud. (Newbies see "Crud") However mine are starting to delaminate for the second time and I agreed a price several weeks ago with Utah49 to buy his (hardly used). But I can't seem to raise him by email or PM: (Anyone know where he is?)
It took some time skiing the Chubbs before I realized that I didn't have to try to control my speed in the crud, but rather just let them run, and they just smash through it but feel smooth as silk.
post #32 of 53
Yes, precisely.
post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forrester
More often than not, chickenhead is a term used to describe a fellatious woman.
I guess I hang out in different circles. I've only heard it referring to really terrible ski conditions.
post #34 of 53
I guess I would qualify as a "Volant Addict" also as my everyday skis are 188cm Power Ti's (1999) and I have 180cm Chubbs (1996) for powder and crud. The Chubbs are truly a godsend on spring powder days like this past May 7 at Mammoth.
post #35 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker
I guess I would qualify as a "Volant Addict" also as my everyday skis are 188cm Power Ti's (1999) and I have 180cm Chubbs (1996) for powder and crud. The Chubbs are truly a godsend on spring powder days like this past May 7 at Mammoth.
Cool, I'd hate to feel like I was the only one. I have a pair of 188 Power Ti's too, but I haven't skied them yet, I bought them post season to feed my jones. They are in fantastic condition, but I'll need to remount the bindings (some one with small feet had them before me. I've heard they are real tanks at that size, but I love my Chubbs at 188 and even take them through the moguls on new snow days.
post #36 of 53
In 1999 188cm. was a correct mainstream length for shaped skis. Newer designs have knocked off another 10cm. since then. Also, in 1999 the Power's 73mm. width made it the widest all-mountain ski, while now it looks narrow vs. the newer skis. I think the new shorter and wider all-mountain skis (I've demoed a couple) are more versatile than my Power Ti's, but for pure powder or crud I'm still most comfortable on my 1996 Chubbs.
post #37 of 53
Hmmm..... I'm feeling a bit guilty for hijacking this thread.... lets see if I can help with the "newbie" lexicon some more to redeem myself:

pa$$hole: season pass holder

paw-paw: powder snow

ant trail: an over crowded run

charging the hill: skiing aggressively down the fall line
post #38 of 53
Let's see.

Touron: cross between tourist and moron

Gnar: steep technical lines

Pow-Pow Gnar-Gnar: steep technical powder lines

Bomber: relates to a very stable snow pack

Rip: when an avalache starts it "rips out"

Flat Light: can't see anything

Exposure: any time the terrain is big and the consequences are huge

Pick: when that tiny little twig takes off a ski
post #39 of 53
In the 1980's death cookies were known as "golf balls."

Hadn't heard "blood wagon." We usually called the rescue toboggan the "meat wagon."
post #40 of 53
"snowsnake" = unseen but overpowering reptile. feeds on ego and the occasional lost glove. invisibly pokes up through otherwise perfect snow conditions and trips up skier.

usually harmless but may lead to "yard sale" or "meat wagon," etc.

unsuspecting victim may mutter "i caught an edge... "
post #41 of 53
offpiste:

I always thought Flat-light is when you can't define the contours on the ground because of low light conditions, White-out is when you can't see anything or cannot see any terrain or landmarks that let you know where you are skiing.
post #42 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog
offpiste:

I always thought Flat-light is when you can't define the contours on the ground because of low light conditions, White-out is when you can't see anything or cannot see any terrain or landmarks that let you know where you are skiing.
I agree with this. Flatlight is usually on overcast or slightly foggy or snowy days. You can see well down the hill, but everything is contourless. Whiteout you can't see up from down.
post #43 of 53
Faceplant: Basic non-twisting fall onto your face. Not to be confused with a yard sale.
Eggbeater or Beater: Tumbling fall usually associated with a yard sale.
Snag: Small limb or other object just below the surface of the snow that catches one or both skis and allows you to hang upside down wondering how to get free.
Bus driver: Instructor with a class following them in a single line.
Tree well: The area at the base of every tree that acts like a "black hole", it sucks in everything that comes too close to it and tries to keep it there.
Treebashing: Skiing through the trees, not to be confused with skiing into the trees.
Catwalk: 1. Narrow beginner run. 2. A relatively flat access road that traverses a ski run, sometimes associated with faceplants.
Plume: The snow being blown off the top of the mountain and onto the slopes of the resort in the next valley.
Pillow: A deposit of snow caused by the wind moving the snow around once it is on the ground. The favorite snack of skiers everywhere.
Snow fence: Device that is used to help create pillows. Also know to cause snagging.
And the one I am surprised it took so long to come up...
Apre-ski: A pre-dinner drinking ritual celebrating the safe conclusion of the ski day. Usually it also involves some tall tales about the day's activities.
post #44 of 53
I don't think I've seen this one yet;

Roostertail: the spray of snow created when turning
post #45 of 53
On chickenheads and death cookies...

In my little circle of crud-skiing afficionados, chickenheads are thought to be frozen protuberances that are *attached* to the snow surface. Death cookies are frozen chunks that are loose. Loose or attached defines the difference.

Under that definition, death cookies are a PITA to ski because they're inconsistent and don't support the ski edges well.

Chickenheads, on the other hand, are absolutely terrifying to ski because they may just grab your ski and rip it right off.

Just to complete the evolution, frozen sun cups could sometimes be considered chickenheads on steroids.
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict
..

pa$$hole: season pass holder

...
I love that one and I'd never heard it before.

That reminds me of the one I heard this past winter. A "flapper" is the exact opposite of a pass holder. It's a reference to the fact that your day ticket "flaps" in the wind when you ski with it attached to your jacket.
post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
...Just to complete the evolution, frozen sun cups could sometimes be considered chickenheads on steroids.
Proceeding even further in the direction of miserable snow, of course how can you forget "coral reef", and the larger version, "tank traps":

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=7951

Tom / PM

PS - A whole bunch of other terms for snow are in this old thread:
http://forums.epicski.com/showpost.p...8&postcount=65
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Latchigo
What is a 'newbie' ?
or

What's a Newbian?


*for you Kevin Smith/Chasing Amy fans
post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
I love that one and I'd never heard it before.
I actually first heard it applied to me; I was skiing near season's end with a friend who's had a pass for the past twenty years or more at the area where I was a first year passholder, and one of the lifties high-fived me and said I was the passholder of the year (I had brought him up a bratworst from the season end bar-b-q the week before). My friend went around telling all the old guard that I was the "Pa$$hole of the Year" (due to my stubbornly and fanatically skiing every day I could [no weekends] reguardless of conditions, which for a good part of the season left the best terrain closed).

I think there is some merit to the term, as I myself developed a real snobbish attitude toward the "flappers", despite my awareness this was stupid.
post #50 of 53
VA,
Have you noticed the rooster coming off twin tip skis.
post #51 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro
VA,
Have you noticed the rooster coming off twin tip skis.
No. I haven't seen a lot of twin tips where I ski. We have no terrain park so there is less interest in them here I think. Do they really spray?
post #52 of 53
Absolutely! Just like a jet-ski. Even at slow to moderate speeds.
post #53 of 53
That's one of the things I don't like about them. My husband (pretty old, like me -- but not much of a skier) loves the "Public Enemy", but he looks pretty weird with those tails shooting out behind him.

I wish we could find an equivalent "normal" ski -- he's not going to be doing tricks, he has two torn ACL's and dislocated his shoulder skiing two years back.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion