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post #61 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
Wigs,

I was thinking about this on my ride yesterday. It seems to be a function of too much time in the saddle.

After riding MTBs for 14 years, I have realized that it's just comfort on the bike and no more need to focus on the details of how to handle/steer/maneuver the bike.

It helps when the trails wind through trees and around obstacles. It helps more when they descend fairly steeply.

Beyond that I'm still clueless.
Well, you got me for time in the saddle over all. But since I got into riding MTB's 5 years ago, I have logged 4000+ miles. For the last 3 years, a lot of time in the dirt and single track. I just love it! And having a Snowmass Mountain right out the back door is a good thing too. But still, my focus is where my front tire is going. Hopefully some day I will have the skills that you have developed and be able to enjoy the scenery while riding. But for right now, it's trying to avoid breaking my ass.------Wigs
post #62 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Someday soon this guy is going to reveal himself as a troll of epic (pun intended) proportions!
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u


How a legend is born?

Quote:
TCS, I've been to your website. Although it painful "to" read due to "your" horrible "grasp" of the "english" language, the videos "tell all".


Thanks for visiting my website. Sorry about the English, the difficulty is that Tai Chi as Unism is really an idea beyond the English language "capability" to grasp, because the true realm of Tai Chi is "wordless"; nevertheless, Tai Chi can be known through the experience of "wordless conscious," the mind of no-mind. I "try" to use the plain English as "plain" as I can, so you may need to read the words in a simpler meaning, all Tai Chi "words" must be terminated/meaning reached at the physical level within "finite" steps of inference, so you may experience it all just through your "physical" body sensations/feeling [without mind], and that is what I called "experience."

And the videos don't really "tell all," they are but "one" run that gets "caught on film."

Quote:
Explain to me how you can "flatboard" on a snowboard? I watched your videos -- you weren't carving turns on a snowboard, but you certainly were using your edges to skid. Riding a snowboard flat in a straight line is somewhat difficult...turning with it flat is just straight up stupid, as you'll immediately catch an edge and start doing "mousetrap" falls.


There maybe another way to look at the flatboarding, if you are not "carving," you are probably doing "flatboarding."

Though flatboard snowboarding may have a different stance from skiing, but the principle is the same--weight on the "nose" to go fast/stability, and weight on the tail to slow down/wobble/brake. The following is an excerpt from an article I published a few seasons ago may give a glimpse how it is done.

"While flatboarding utilizes all the basic maneuvers of snowboarding, it primarily rides the board "flat" (i.e. no scratching feeling of edging). With the body centered over the board, the rider shifts more weight to the forward foot to go fast, and more weight on the back foot to slow down. Turning is done by adjusting the "angle of attack" (the angle between the board and the line traveled) for the rate of turn, and as if that is not enough to turn, the edge pressure is then used to achieve the desired result. By referencing the pressure from the balls and the heels of the feet and balancing them to achieve an equilibrium with gravity, flatboarding is to ride/flow on the top of the snow, just like surfing the ocean waves.

The ultimate free ride is there when you find yourself "fall" with the gravity in a line just materialized in your mind in the mist of bottomless powder, and know that you are not just surfing, yes, flying as well. You'll have entered the state of nirvana. Wow, all the transformation with flatboarding in deep powder, what a magic!"

HIH,
IS
post #63 of 82
There maybe another way to look at the flatboarding, if you are not "carving," you are probably doing "flatboarding.

And there we have it.
post #64 of 82
Haven't wiggled yet Tai-chi... that might be your "mutated resoning" mean youre full of BS... but thats you. Are you really that ignorant that you believe nothing until you see it? Not a lot of the people on this site have seen each other ski, yet we all have respect for each other and do not question each persons ability. You would be wise to do the same before I decide to schedule my next vacation for the Tahoe area. We are due for one next year... we were thinking that Jackson would be nice... but the trip would be worth it just to humiliate you. And yes, with a week of tele and snowboard training i WOULD school you at both. I have no doubt... but you'd be too dumb to realise you were being schooled so I think you need to be educated before i waste two weeks of skiing time.
Later
GREG
post #65 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
There maybe another way to look at the flatboarding, if you are not "carving," you are probably doing "flatboarding."
If my aunt had balls, she'd be my uncle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
Though flatboard snowboarding may have a different stance from skiing, but the principle is the same--weight on the "nose" to go fast/stability, and weight on the tail to slow down/wobble/brake.
Nope. If you've ever watched beginner snowboarders, you'll be familar with the "sitting on the tail while terrified" manuever. This causes the board to accelerate, which then leads to a fall (with beginners, at least). More accomplished riders, however, will often sit/squat on the tail while on long traverses in order to gain a little more speed. As far as putting weight on the tail to brake, well, that's so far beyond stupid that I'm not even going to address it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
The following is an excerpt from an article I published a few seasons ago may give a glimpse how it is done.
You were pub...nevermind!

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
"While flatboarding utilizes all the basic maneuvers of snowboarding, it primarily rides the board "flat" (i.e. no scratching feeling of edging). With the body centered over the board, the rider shifts more weight to the forward foot to go fast, and more weight on the back foot to slow down. Turning is done by adjusting the "angle of attack" (the angle between the board and the line traveled) for the rate of turn, and as if that is not enough to turn, the edge pressure is then used to achieve the desired result. By referencing the pressure from the balls and the heels of the feet and balancing them to achieve an equilibrium with gravity, flatboarding is to ride/flow on the top of the snow, just like surfing the ocean waves.
What you've just described is basically a level 4-5 snowboarder. Unlike your skiing technique, which bears little resemblance to anything undertaken outside of a mental institution or perhaps Queer Eye goes Skiing, your snowboard technique is simply that of a less accomplished snowboarder. After "mastering" your flatboard garbage, the rider would then move on to carving (and most likely never look back).

Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing
You'll have entered the state of nirvana. Wow, all the transformation with flatboarding in deep powder, what a magic!"
Nirvana...Ok, I finally get it! You're on the same drugs Cobain was on!
HIH,
IS[/quote]

I'm hitting the ignore button now, I swear!
post #66 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Haven't wiggled yet Tai-chi... that might be your "mutated resoning" mean youre full of BS... but thats you. Are you really that ignorant that you believe nothing until you see it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier


No, nevertheless, the same question is also apply to you. So whatever you call me, you are full of it.

Quote:
Not a lot of the people on this site have seen each other ski, yet we all have respect for each other and do not question each persons ability.


Yet, you were bashing me before we even meet. "I have little respect to those who lack of self-respect." And one who has self-respect will not write drivels like yours.

Quote:
You would be wise to do the same before I decide to schedule my next vacation for the Tahoe area. We are due for one next year... we were thinking that Jackson would be nice... but the trip would be worth it just to humiliate you. And yes, with a week of tele and snowboard training i WOULD school you at both. I have no doubt... but you'd be too dumb to realise you were being schooled so I think you need to be educated before i waste two weeks of skiing time.

Later

GREG


If you don't feel embarrassed to find out what I said is all true (probably you don't), bring it on. For a week of snowboard training, you cannot even reach where I usually board. Better to secure a good health insurance policy before you come up.

What's the bet?


IS
post #67 of 82
This is going to be good,planning ski trip to Tahoe.
post #68 of 82
Is anyone taking bets on whether TCS is actually a troll / kidding?

Post #62 has got me about ready to buy the troll theory. Iski2fast4u mocks his inexplicable use of quotation marks, and TCS comes right back with a short passage of text featuring no less than 12 random quotation, finishing with flair:

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCS
the videos don't really "tell all," they are but "one" run that gets "caught on film."
post #69 of 82
So as not to disrupt this thread, I moved my response to the question of whether TCS is a troll over to the old TaiChiSkiing thread:
http://forums.epicski.com/showpost.p...&postcount=164

Tom / PM
post #70 of 82
Tai chi skier has made the most interesting posts in this thread and on this discussion forum based on the number and length of replies he has generated. But, let's try to respect Nolo's question which was also interesting and stay on topic. I'm as interested in flatboarding as the next guy, but maybe it doesn't need to be the focus of so many threads.

He obviously thrives on attention so please do not ignore him. He might contribute less to Epicski if he got less feedback. Then Epicski would be boring again...

I'm excited to hear his answers to Physicsman's questions but I think they should have been asked in one of the many threads that are about flatboarding.
post #71 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
...I think they should have been asked in one of the many threads that are about flatboarding.
Good point. DONE!

Tom / PM
post #72 of 82
HAHA... he said bring it... haha... fool. Seems like removing your head from your own arse is going to require a surgical proceedure... After all the ass kickings youre getting here... it might be so far up there its never coming out...
...You did say bring it right? You really are out of your mind.
Later
GREG
post #73 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
HAHA... he said bring it... haha... fool. Seems like removing your head from your own arse is going to require a surgical proceedure... After all the ass kickings youre getting here... it might be so far up there its never coming out...
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier

...You did say bring it right? You really are out of your mind.

Later

GREG



In the realm of idiot, idiotic language reigns.


IS
post #74 of 82

no?

No link?

No free ad space?
post #75 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
You learn to ski in summer. Do you think it's true, or is it just a platitude? How can you actually learn a motor skill without actually doing it?

What do you say, does this apply only to those who go to summer race camp in the S.H. or on crowded glaciers in the N.H., or is it something we all might consider doing more of?
Interesting question. Before reading the rest of this thread, I'll respond with my initial thoughts. Then, I'll read and see how close I came to the rest of you!

I "learn" a lot by visualization, replay, and analysis. During the off-season (or, even between on-snow opportunities during the winter), I'll take apart turns, consider the articulation of my body, the feelings generated, the results on the skis of certain movements, and so on. Doing so allows me to actually understand more of what I'm trying to do on-snow, and can lead to ingrained feeling that I can apply.

I also use dryland training (mostly a Skiers Edge) to understand and ingrain some of this, as well.

My goal is to be able to ski free of thought for much of the season. Last year, it took me about 10 days on-snow to get there. This year, I am planning to concentrate more days earlier in the season to pass this point more quickly. I also plan to use pre-season visualization more methodically. My ultimate goal is to be at my full capability when ESA rolls around in January. I wasn't even close this year...
post #76 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
I "learn" a lot by visualization, replay, and analysis. During the off-season (or, even between on-snow opportunities during the winter), I'll take apart turns, consider the articulation of my body, the feelings generated, the results on the skis of certain movements, and so on. Doing so allows me to actually understand more of what I'm trying to do on-snow, and can lead to ingrained feeling that I can apply.
I also use dryland training (mostly a Skiers Edge) to understand and ingrain some of this, as well.
Yes, yes, yes. I couldn´t formulate it better for myself.
(I only don´t have Skiers Edge and do some simulation exercises using a rope and a wide belt allowing inclined etc. body positions and various weighting of both feet. Mostly in sneakers but sometimes also in skiboots.)
post #77 of 82
I think Nolo's sugestion has great potential to be explored, both with the body and within the mind.

I know my in-line skating up/down hills doing ski turns in the summer has helped my snow skiing.

I also know thinking about transferring the things I've learned thru snow skiing (biomechanics, etc) into my summer waterskiing has helped me get up to speed quicker when I hit the water in the spring.

I reviewed one particular video of very technically accuracte pro slalom waterskiing several times a week all winter while imagining my skiing the same way and felt it contributed to the best off-the-dock and into a slalom course skiing I ever could have wished for on day-1 this spring.

Note, I did not watch a waterski Pro running 41'-off using balistic mega-power movements I will never aspire to, but a Pro with really accurate movements I can relate to smoothly demo'ng 32'-off, which is the stepping stone I am at and aspire to become more consistant at this summer.

The use of imagery in the off season is a powerful tool, if you are watching technically correct movements. If you can relate to those movements, and imagine yourself making them as you watch, you can actually create more consistantly accurate neuro-muscular pathways than what you might normally ski with. If you can imagine the movements, then your body has the capability of making them.

So for snow skiing find video of really clean, consistant skiers showing where you aspire to progress to this next season and let yourself "feel" the movements as you watch them and you can build "cues" to think about to help trigger those movements when you hit the snow.
post #78 of 82
Thread Starter 
That's an excellent suggestion, Arc. In fact, I was talking with Weems about doing a movement analysis extra curricular session at ESA, and he made the similarly brilliant suggestion that we watch clips of skiers skiing right, sort of a spin on affirmative action.
post #79 of 82
Interestingly enough, that´s precisely what I had suggested in an article I wrote for the spring issue of our SNOW magazine (I already reported somewhere, the title was "Don´t Ski but Get Better").

"A video/CD showing perfect technique with slo-mo (unfortunately, I don´t know any, maybe some analyses of worldcuppers but their skiing is a bit too specific and more suitable for racers than generally) would be excellent."... Best is if you don´t loose the feeling of the turn... if you can, let´s say in bed before falling asleep, evoke the the feeling of your perfect skiing on perfect morning corduroy... mentally reconstruct such a ride... evoke the "taste" of such a ride using all possible senses, including colors, and with details..." "Am I crazy? You can be as well, the advantage is no one has to know... and, last but not least, vizualization is the least expensive training..."

(The translation is not up to much, a fast job at that, the original in my native language is better.)
post #80 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
That's an excellent suggestion, Arc. In fact, I was talking with Weems about doing a movement analysis extra curricular session at ESA, and he made the similarly brilliant suggestion that we watch clips of skiers skiing right, sort of a spin on affirmative action.
ALMOST ALWAYS helps, methinks.

I have learned loads about riding by watching "Earthed" and "Earthed 2", two MTB vids by Alex Rankin that cover the UCI World Cup MTB DH/4x race pros across a season. It's startling how the most striking thing about top-level high-speed technical DH riding is that the best riders maintain body centeredness and next-move anticipation as solidly and as well as the best ski racers. You can see errors leading to crashes and you can see recoveries that show pure athleticism and strong "muscle memory."

The more I become aware of the intersection of:

- eyes see terrain
- brain considers terrain
- brain sends impulses to trigger movements
- movements cause bike/ground interaction
- ground responds and bike responds to interaction
- how I react to those twin responses... and
- begin again, eternally

the better I become as an athlete devoted to alpine skiing and technical MTB riding... and the better an athlete OVERALL I become, age demerits notwithstanding.

I think seeing Arcmeister ripping on a water ski would be fun to watch, after seeing him play around on one ski at ESA Big Sky.
post #81 of 82
Thread Starter 
Got any video, Arc?
post #82 of 82

........

...100% agreement with you JoeB:
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