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Summertime - Page 2

post #31 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo
You learn to ski in summer. Do you think it's true, or is it just a platitude? How can you actually learn a motor skill without actually doing it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo

What do you say, does this apply only to those who go to summer race camp in the S.H. or on crowded glaciers in the N.H., or is it something we all might consider doing more of?


Why, flatboard rollerblading, of course,

http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/flatboard_rollerblading2c.wmv

have fun,
IS
post #32 of 82
You're completely insane... you realise that right?
Later
GREG
post #33 of 82
post #34 of 82
Yeah, if you in-line skate to develop skiing skills you have to race Comprex from Athens to Atlanta. Otherwise, you're full of it!
post #35 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
Yeah, if you in-line skate to develop skiing skills you have to race Comprex from Athens to Atlanta. Otherwise, you're full of it!


Why do I "have to" exhaust myself in a long distance race to show I know how to rollerblade? Don't you know how to read the contents of a video clip? Or just you, are full of it?


IS
post #36 of 82
That video shows a skater with:
- Poor static balance meaning weight is mostly on the back wheels
- A constantly edged (not flat!) right skate during 'glide'
- Too wide a scissor
- Use of edges during the parallel turn, yet failure to commit upper body to turn
- No awareness of edge change (and poor front to back balance) as shown by attempted 180
- Shoulder droop in turns
- Toe flick
- No concept of glide during a striding motion
- Constant use of inner edges during forward stroke.

Surely, TCS, that skater is not you. That skater would probably benefit from some alignment and lessons. So, lets go down to Georgia and you can show the best of the East Coast what there is in it. Heck, I'll even bring the brandy for some flatglass drinking.
post #37 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
That video shows a skater with:


Fancy you can pity, nevertheless, we are here to talk how to exercise the motor skills for "skiing," not for "skating."

Quote:
- Poor static balance meaning weight is mostly on the back wheels


Good dynamic balance, and solid wheel-blades control begin at the "back" wheels (on the front wheels when you go backward).

Quote:
- A constantly edged (not flat!) right skate during 'glide'


That's flatboard slipping-turn; oops, there're no slipping and skidding on wheels.

Quote:
- Too wide a scissor


Huh? Where and what about?

Quote:
- Use of edges during the parallel turn, yet failure to commit upper body to turn


Carve turn on wheels, it's a good form if you can keep your upper body "quiet."

Quote:
- No awareness of edge change (and poor front to back balance) as shown by attempted 180


Huh? Jumping 180 does not really involve edge changes and without edge change, there's no "parallel turn." I did parallel turn, didn't I?

Quote:
- Shoulder droop in turns


Shoulder leads the turns.


Quote:
- Toe flick


Huh? Where and what about?

Quote:
- No concept of glide during a striding motion


You are not supposed to "stride" when you rollerblade skiing.

Quote:
- Constant use of inner edges during forward stroke.


Herribone, for uphill.

Thanks for critic, nevertheless, are you sure you read the video clip right? Maybe it's time to go back to your coaches to freshen up a bit on "seeing and observing" technique again?

Quote:
Surely, TCS, that skater is not you. That skater would probably benefit from some alignment and lessons. So, lets go down to Georgia and you can show the best of the East Coast what there is in it. Heck, I'll even bring the brandy for some flatglass drinking.


It is me alright, as I said, I'm in this for the skiing, not skating, so if you have special technique that can stop the wheels on the hill without brake [as there's no braking "device" with skiing, I also rollerblading without brake], and without tumble and fall, I would be very much like to hear it; otherwise, ..., well, thanks for the brandy, I don't drink.


IS
post #38 of 82

pathetic/mutated

Just another attempt to drum up business. Ho hum.
post #39 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing

Why do I "have to" exhaust myself in a long distance race to show I know how to rollerblade? Don't you know how to read the contents of a video clip? Or just you, are full of it?


IS
Or perhaps I was being sarcastic? I was poking fun at Comprex, not you. I read the video. I could rollerblade better than you the first time I tried it but hey, if you're having fun! That's what the spirit of ski lifestyle is all about, right?

I shouldn't say I skated better than you, just with a style I prefer to your style. Who am I to say what is better?
post #40 of 82
Thread Starter 
I think the paradox is true, so long as you're doing sports in a focused manner in summer, not just messing around. Badminton played seriously will benefit your skiing, even if there seems to be no transfer. I contend that all sports will transfer something positively to skiing, even swimming, which is often used as an example of a sport that transfers negatively to skiing (rotation of torso). This is because all sports share some common elements, such as functional tension, looking ahead, preparation and followthrough, continuity of motion, etc. If you focus on improving such an element, it is likely to carry over to your skiing.
post #41 of 82
I watched TCS's rollerblade video and he looks like he is a fairly athletic person. Now if he would just get some good instruction to utilize his strong points.
post #42 of 82
Isn't swimming great for developing a lot of core strength? As long as you can develop a definite separation between your swimming/skiing techniques i would think that such a workout may transfer positively. I suppose that other core excercises may be of more benefit though...

BTW, i do play a lot of badminton moderately seriously (im no olympic star, but i can hold my own) and it makes you very, very quick. Keeping a lower center of mass and a wider - more athletic stance allows you to move around the court very quickly - much like you do in tennis.

Later

GREG
post #43 of 82
Nolo,
I remember some years ago the swimming vs skiing debate being more about the muscle activities and the type of muscle they develop. Fast twitch vs slow twitch fibers. Endurance vs sprinting. The rotary is something new to me, but it does make sense. I did some knee re-hab by running in a 4' deep wading pool but I assume it was to keep weight out of the mix. I am a very poor swimmer but a good friend of mine was a competetive swimmer and he is a great skier, so it can't hurt that much.
post #44 of 82
Thread Starter 
My sports through age 16 were swimming and skiing. The rotation that worked well in swimming didn't help my ski technique--it is still my #1 weakness. I trained 6 days a week year round for swim competitions, and though I skied from a young age, I only competed for about half the years that I did swimming, only training on weekends during the season. I was much more successful at swimming than ski racing, and gave it priority.

This is just a hypothesis, and one that may rank right there next to phrenology, but looking at the physique a swimmer develops vs. the physique a skier develops, I visualize triangles: the skier's triangle is base down and the swimmer's is base high. One is the opposite of the other.
post #45 of 82
Swimming vs. skiing:

I think that on the level (almost) all of us ski or swim the interference is just a theory.
Bode Miller would suffer from regular and intensive swimming training and a swimmer from too much skiing but I doubt that the amount of swimming most of us could realistically experience would endanger our skiing ability.
It all depends on quantity, intensity, and timing. There are a lot of incompatible activities but in small amounts and with proper timing they don´t do any harm, especially to people like us, i.e. unless you are a top athlete.

There are even contrary opinions regarding swimming. They appeared in a discussion earlier this spring in the www.carving-ski.de forum.
post #46 of 82
Nolo, I agree about the upper/lower body development, the same friend and I raced bikes for years and his "swimmers shoulders" caught a lot of air. He was great to draft behind, but it slowed him down when we descended. Although I must say that going uphill he was hard to catch. We used this to our advantage. I would push the pace and burn out getting him through the first half of a climb. If it was a flat or downhill race he would do the same for me.
Not all that scientific but it worked.
Checkracer,
I ski every day of the winter so I do not swim. Thanks for the sharing the web page, maybe they will change my mind.
post #47 of 82
I was a fairly good volleyball player when in my teens. There were quite a few activities "prohibited": swimming, long distance running, bicycling, sunbathing... all that interfered with what you need to jump high.
A younger friend of mine was even on the national junior team. He had a list of undesirable activities from his coach and he refused to participate in some of them in the class. Funny enough, he finally decided to study sports at the university and had considerable problems to learn things he needed and had refused to do. I´m sure his status helped him master everything during studies. (He even became Captain of the Czechoslovakia national team in the 70s.)

While there are more and less suitable activities for skiers for most people any activity is better than none.
I have to do some more sit-ups...
post #48 of 82
Funny I went out for a ride and was just telling myself I needed to do mine as well. I guess I should do them now before I get another reminder...

Addition in editing; Imaging does work but the only examples I know involve basketball players and ski racers. Cybervision sound right? I still believe a combination of that, inline skating, and strength training is the best core of activities. Biking and soccer seem to help a lot as well.
post #49 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider
I watched TCS's rollerblade video and he looks like he is a fairly athletic person. Now if he would just get some good instruction to utilize his strong points.



Thanks for the compliments, maybe you're right, or you may get it all wrong, so, how do you "stop the wheels on the hill without brake"?


IS
post #50 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
hmmmm...


and of course this comes because I am thinking also about skiing while I ride my MTB... how I do that, I could not tell you. I just do it.
Gonz,

When you figure that out let me know. The only thing I'm thinking about on single track is what's in front of me and where Im going to put my front tire and that's all.----Wigs
post #51 of 82
taichiskiing: how do you "stop the wheels on the hill without brake"?

You do a T break (i.e. use one of your skate to drag it perpendicular to the direction of travel. People think this is cool, but nothing destroys a set of wheels faster!

Very good skaters can also do a variation of a hockey stop, but this only works at certain speeds. Too slow and you don't have the momentum to slide, too fast and you will need a miracle to remain on your feet after the slide.

Of course you can always control your speed by turning, completing your turns and even going up the hill if necessary. Unfortunately this is completely against the faltboarding silliness you aspire to. From what I see on that video, you would not know how to stop on a very steep hill since you have no breaks and your "turns" are nothing but wiggles that make you look funny. Hopefully you know how to do a T break.
post #52 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wigs
Gonz,

When you figure that out let me know. The only thing I'm thinking about on single track is what's in front of me and where Im going to put my front tire and that's all.----Wigs
Wigs,

I was thinking about this on my ride yesterday. It seems to be a function of too much time in the saddle.

After riding MTBs for 14 years, I have realized that it's just comfort on the bike and no more need to focus on the details of how to handle/steer/maneuver the bike.

It helps when the trails wind through trees and around obstacles. It helps more when they descend fairly steeply.

Beyond that I'm still clueless.
post #53 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
taichiskiing: how do you "stop the wheels on the hill without brake"?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB

You do a T break (i.e. use one of your skate to drag it perpendicular to the direction of travel. People think this is cool, but nothing destroys a set of wheels faster!

Very good skaters can also do a variation of a hockey stop, but this only works at certain speeds. Too slow and you don't have the momentum to slide, too fast and you will need a miracle to remain on your feet after the slide.


Uhh... yes, they may do that, however, there's really no skidding or slipping on wheels.

Quote:
Of course you can always control your speed by turning, completing your turns and even going up the hill if necessary. Unfortunately this is completely against the faltboarding silliness you aspire to. From what I see on that video, you would not know how to stop on a very steep hill since you have no breaks and your "turns" are nothing but wiggles that make you look funny. Hopefully you know how to do a T break.


Thanks for the tips. The T break doesn't really work on a [moderate steep] hill; at the speed, you don't really have time to "set up" the "T" to break (the straight down blade goes much faster than the one points to the sideway). If you don't make a square "T," you shoot out sideway like a carved turn. Turn around go uphill is a good idea if you have the space, however, turning within a four feet (the width of the bike path) diameter circle/loop on a hill is tough proposition. Watch out the washout at the bottom of the loop.

As how I turn, you can drop your pathetic pretentious now, how do you think I come around at the end of the run? Or just you don't want to read/see something that is better than you envisioned?


IS
post #54 of 82
taichiskiing: As how I turn, you can drop your pathetic pretentious now, how do you think I come around at the end of the run? Or just you don't want to read/see something that is better than you envisioned?

You call that steep (where you make that turn)?

Frankly, I would like to see you ride a steep (say 15-25 degree) slope making parallel turns. Using a lead foot is a good technique, but does little for your skiing. This would teach you the value of carving and completing your turns. Maybe then you will be able to appreciate the true cross-over benefits between in-line skating and skiing. Just sliding aimlessly and wiggling your feet won't give you that skill. Your are a better skater than skier, I will give you that, but your insistance on the faltboarding stupidity limits you in ways you cannot even begin to imagine.

I have not seen a single person here agree with you regarding flatboarding. What would it take for you to realize that you are alone in your stubborness (and ignorance)?
post #55 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
taichiskiing: As how I turn, you can drop your pathetic pretentious now, how do you think I come around at the end of the run? Or just you don't want to read/see something that is better than you envisioned?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB

You call that steep (where you make that turn)?

Frankly, I would like to see you ride a steep (say 15-25 degree) slope making parallel turns.


http://www.taomartialarts.com/ski/flatboard_rollerblading00.wmv

Quote:
Using a lead foot is a good technique, but does little for your skiing. This would teach you the value of carving and completing your turns. Maybe then you will be able to appreciate the true cross-over benefits between in-line skating and skiing. Just sliding aimlessly and wiggling your feet won't give you that skill. Your are a better skater than skier, I will give you that, but your insistance on the faltboarding stupidity limits you in ways you cannot even begin to imagine.


I have demonstrated the flatboard principle/technique on downhill skiing, tele, and snowboarding, that's the three major disciplines of downhill sliding sport, and now crossing to a whole new environment, "wheel induced slopes," but you think that I'm limiting myself?

Or just you lack of imagination?

Quote:
I have not seen a single person here agree with you regarding flatboarding. What would it take for you to realize that you are alone in your stubborness (and ignorance)?




Nor I see a single person here can do all four sports mentioned above with such high level of efficiency. Now you're going to say I'm bragging so is arrogant, right?


IS
post #56 of 82
Not bragging just deluded.
post #57 of 82
Nearly all of my team mates would put you in your place... most all of them are able to tele, and snowboard... and we all skate well enough to play ice hockey for fun when we get bored. Ever try using a useful technique while trying these sports? The guys i know can adapt to EACH SPORT'S techniques... they don't make up their own style and call the rest of the world ignorant so they don't feel inadequate. I don't snowboard or tele... but i bet if you gave me a week to practice each I could school you in both disciplines. Probably most people here could. And... you probably don't want to start challenging expert skiers to inline skating battles... loose that as well, you will.
Later
GREG
post #58 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier
Nearly all of my team mates would put you in your place... most all of them are able to tele, and snowboard... and we all skate well enough to play ice hockey for fun when we get bored.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier


"That's what I heard, but haven't seen them..."

Quote:
Ever try using a useful technique while trying these sports? The guys i know can adapt to EACH SPORT'S techniques... they don't make up their own style and call the rest of the world ignorant so they don't feel inadequate.


Are you claiming the credit for what they can do, but yourself don't do it?

Quote:
I don't snowboard or tele... but i bet if you gave me a week to practice each I could school you in both disciplines. Probably most people here could. And... you probably don't want to start challenging expert skiers to inline skating battles... loose that as well, you will.

Later

GREG


Yup, I like to see that; how much bet you want to wiggle this time now?


IS
post #59 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by ydnar
Not bragging just deluded.


"While Peng (a mystical condor) rises for a ninety thousand miles excursion, "a cicada and a young dove laugh at Peng, saying, 'When we try hard, we can reach the trees, but sometimes we fall short and drop on the ground. How is it possible to rise ninety thousand li and head south?'"—Chuang Tsu, "Happy Wandering," Ch. 1—(Tr. Gia-Fu Feng)


IS
post #60 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichiskiing

I have demonstrated the flatboard principle/technique on downhill skiing, tele, and snowboarding, that's the three major disciplines of downhill sliding sport, and now crossing to a whole new environment, "wheel induced slopes," but you think that I'm limiting myself?

Or just you lack of imagination?





Nor I see a single person here can do all four sports mentioned above with such high level of efficiency. Now you're going to say I'm bragging so is arrogant, right?


IS
Someday soon this guy is going to reveal himself as a troll of epic (pun intended) proportions!

TCS, I've been to your website. Although it painful "to" read due to "your" horrible "grasp" of the "english" language, the videos "tell all". Explain to me how you can "flatboard" on a snowboard? I watched your videos -- you weren't carving turns on a snowboard, but you certainly were using your edges to skid. Riding a snowboard flat in a straight line is somewhat difficult...turning with it flat is just straight up stupid, as you'll immediately catch an edge and start doing "mousetrap" falls.
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