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Skiing Golfers vs. Golfing Skiers

Poll Results: Do you golf?

Poll expired: Jun 17, 2005  
  • 37% (22)
    Yes, nearly as much as I ski.
  • 24% (14)
    Yes, but only occasionally.
  • 37% (22)
    No. What a stupid game!
58 Total Votes  
post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Now that most of us are done sliding downhill, I was wondering how many of you immediately transition to the golf course? I for one have already played about 10 times after hanging up my skis on Mother's Day. Anyone else as rabid a golfer as they are skier?
post #2 of 35
I think I played golf twice last summer, and have yet to pull a stick out of the bag this summer. I immediately transition to biking when it gets too warm to ski.
post #3 of 35
I wish I played golf as often as I skied. I put in 35 days on the slopes this year, and have managed to get in about 4-5 rounds on the links since late March. Unfortunately here in CO they don't offer season passes to golf resorts for $300- or else I'd have a heck of a lot more days on the course.
post #4 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Now that most of us are done sliding downhill, I was wondering how many of you immediately transition to the golf course? I for one have already played about 10 times after hanging up my skis on Mother's Day. Anyone else as rabid a golfer as they are skier?
I can't understand the correlation between the two. And yet, so many people seem to do it. I want to see Danielle Aimee on a pair of skis...
post #5 of 35
My husband is the opposite of me. If the mountain and the course are both open, I'll be skiing while he's golfing.
post #6 of 35
Thread Starter 

Where's the correlation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by warren
I can't understand the correlation between the two. And yet, so many people seem to do it. I want to see Danielle Aimee on a pair of skis...
I can't understand the correlation either, Warren. As a skiing golfer, the only similarities I can see between the two sports are the relative cost and socio-economic standing of the majority of participants. Also, most winter resort areas either already have golf courses nearby, or if not, are feverishly building courses to take advantage of skiing golfers.

Then again, it's not just winter resorts building courses right now...One of the indian casinos in CT just opened a magnificent golf resort this past week. Don't quote me on this, but if I remember correctly they spent close to if not over a BILLION dollars on it. Now if only we could get some mountain resorts to start dropping a few billion on upgrades and amenities!
post #7 of 35
Well my 2cents go like this. Golfing is just a way to get over my depression when my skiing ends for the season, as is everything else I tend to drink as I golf therefore I yell fore more Drink when skiing done for the day, not during. Walk the course to burn the beers To hell with anything but DH skiing
post #8 of 35
Maybe not so much on this board, but among the masses there is a natural demographic commonality between skiers and golfers.

I've been to the driving range and locked in to play a round next week. Would have golfed sooner, but the honeydo list is long. I'd golf more, but there is only so much leisure time/capital in a year. As expensive as skiing can be, for me it is easier to get the 6 members of my family out on a ski slope justifying that expenditure of leisure capital, than it is to get all or most of us on a golf course together. Lately I'm averaging about 5 rounds of golf per year, sometimes with my teenage son. During the '70s when I was a single 20-something there were years when I had both a season ski pass and a golf club membership, skiing and golfing as much as 30-50 days each. Those were the days, but I rationalize that if I kept that up I might be a lonely old burned out sports junkie cripple by now. Instead I'm an insanely busy parent and spouse - just kidding. My family saves me from being totally consumed with myself.
post #9 of 35
Golf and skiing are more similar than might appear at first glance:
1. Both involve being outdoors in an attractive environment.
2. Both are very social sports which are at their best when enjoyed with friends. We are social creatures after all and the social interaction is as important as the experience itself.
3. Both require precise balance, coordination, rhythm and strength.
4. Both require years to develop a high level of skill.
5. Both involve apres ski/golf social rituals often including adult beverages.
6. Both demand a sense of humor and the ability to laugh at yourself.
7. You learn something new every time you do/play either sport.
8. Both sports challenge you to come back again to see if you can do it a little better next time.
post #10 of 35
Thread Starter 
Excellent points, Choucas. Although I thought the outdoors in an attractive environment point was a little bit of a "duh" comment, after you wrote it I reconsidered. Although Yankee stadium is also an outdoor venue, both the mountains and the links are more natural in their appearance (They may not BE more natural, but at least appear to be!).

And yes, the adult beverage aspect of both sports is very important, although it's much safer to imbibe on the course in the middle of a round than it is to imbibe on the mountain in the middle of a run!
post #11 of 35
On a scale from 1-10, I would rate my recreational activities (in terms of enjoyment) as follows:
Skiing = 10
SCUBA = 8
Biking, Hiking, fishing and Baseball = 7
Golf, = 3
post #12 of 35
I am a golfing skier although i will get more rounds of golf in than I do days on the slopes. But I am a skier first, golfer second.
post #13 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I am a golfing skier although i will get more rounds of golf in than I do days on the slopes. But I am a skier first, golfer second.
As long as you have your priorities straight, you'll always be cool in my book. Plus you can spin 3's!
post #14 of 35
In my opinion, there is one major difference between golf and skiing. Golf is a game, skiing is a sport. Besides, golf does not offer the rush/excitement that skiing does. That is where mountain biking comes in (for me).

Seriously, if I had to choose between playing a silly game and burning some serious calories while getting the old adrenaline rush, then golf will be at the bottom of my list. On the other hand, there comes an age when golf is the ideal activity. I am not at that age yet (although my body often acts like it).
post #15 of 35
I grew up playing golf but in the last couple of years lost the passion for the game. I was a serious golfer. Played in college and kept a low handicap for the last 20 years. But I got bored with the game and the direction it has taken. I spend my free time in the summer working out and fly fishing. I also grew up skiing and love the sport as much now as I ever have.

I hope I get the passion back for golf. It's a great game that I have a lot of respect for.
post #16 of 35

Skier first, golfer second

I started out playing golf at 6 and it was my first sport for many years. Skiing came along in my teens and was instant love and the polar opposite of golf for me. Skiing was fun and pure adrelalin and golf was lots of practice, strategy, and usually a slow pace. More of a game than a sport.

As a senior I should be playing more golf but I have found that I can maintain a high level of recreational skiiing without much effort (just stay in shape, which is not always so easy). The new equipment is a big help for older skiers.

Golf has suffered more as I have aged due to arthritis and other things. I cannot practice 3 or 4 times/wk nor play as much as I once did (4 or 5 times/wk). My 0 handicap is gone although I still play a good round occasionally. Most rounds are a few good holes, some terrible ones, and lots of scambling. I have learned to accept a more irratic game but in skiing, as long as I do not run gates or ski moguls, my skill level is as high as ever. My athletic skills have dimished and I avoid moguls and other slopes and conditions that are more appropriate for younger skiers. But I still intensely enjoy skiing and ski many slopes with no dimished skills. Hopefully, I can continue to do that into my 70s and 80s or beyond.

Maybe if I did not keep score I would enjoy golf more.....that is one benefit of skiing unless you are a racer.....no winners or losers, no scores.
post #17 of 35
Skiing you can skid a turn and be fine, golf if you skid a stroke, you are in the woods.
post #18 of 35
Yep -another addiction here too -played today for the 12 th time since last day on the slopes . I'm a skiing golfer tho --even tho i chase the damn ball 3-4 times a week !!
post #19 of 35
I only play appox. a dozen rounds a year, but hit golf balls at the local range everyday I am home! Makes little or no sense I know. I really enjoy banging golf balls and tinkering with my swing ,which results in an ever changing swing that rarely is sustaining. When I do play I'm pretty terrible with scores in the midd90's last year. Have shot mid 80's before but not last year. First year I played golf shot 101 on a decent course. Liked it so much, I thought I wanted to get better and bought every instruction book I could find and many swing training devices including the all time rip off Greg Norman's Secret.

Ended up with paralysis by analysis . The people at the range think I'm the ultimate head case and can't understand why I can't play better golf . I read somewhere where Hank Haney Tiger's current swing coach , developed driver yipps so bad he couldn't hit a driver for a couple of years.

Thankfully I have not over done movement analysis in skiing . In golf I think I ended up being a collection of swing mechanics (often misinterpreted) and couldn't see the forest for the trees, and ended up with a swing that was never very repeatable.

Skiing is my first love, but hitting a golf ball on the screws is a very satisfying thing too.
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
And yes, the adult beverage aspect of both sports is very important, although it's much safer to imbibe on the course in the middle of a round than it is to imbibe on the mountain in the middle of a run!
And ski runs don't have cart girls!!!

Hmm, guess as a teaching professional in both sports I'm not supposed to say that.

Also that's the reason I didn't partake in the poll. Guess I would have to say I love both equally. I'll never get as many rounds as teaching days on the hill. Just need to figure out how to get exactly 6 months of both.
post #21 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikewil
And ski runs don't have cart girls!!!
Ah, the cart girls...they make Mark Twain's proverbial "Good walk ruined" a-ok!
post #22 of 35
I hear what you're saying, but these are very "soft" things. I also picked up on the socio-economic aspects as well. I can't help but feel that a number of people ski/golf because they have the means to buy the latest expensive tools (how big is your quiver?) to improve (and blame on) some missing facet in their lives.

Anyway, I was kind of focused on the "feeling" I get from skiing: that adrenaline rush from speed, gravity, and fear. I would understand better someone who was into mountain biking, kayaking, and inline skating during the summertime. Golf just seems way too passive, regardless of the other challenges it presents.

Besides, I hate the bugs...

Quote:
Originally Posted by choucas
Golf and skiing are more similar than might appear at first glance:
1. Both involve being outdoors in an attractive environment.
2. Both are very social sports which are at their best when enjoyed with friends. We are social creatures after all and the social interaction is as important as the experience itself.
3. Both require precise balance, coordination, rhythm and strength.
4. Both require years to develop a high level of skill.
5. Both involve apres ski/golf social rituals often including adult beverages.
6. Both demand a sense of humor and the ability to laugh at yourself.
7. You learn something new every time you do/play either sport.
8. Both sports challenge you to come back again to see if you can do it a little better next time.
post #23 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by warren
I hear what you're saying, but these are very "soft" things. I also picked up on the socio-economic aspects as well. I can't help but feel that a number of people ski/golf because they have the means to buy the latest expensive tools (how big is your quiver?) to improve (and blame on) some missing facet in their lives.

Anyway, I was kind of focused on the "feeling" I get from skiing: that adrenaline rush from speed, gravity, and fear. I would understand better someone who was into mountain biking, kayaking, and inline skating during the summertime. Golf just seems way too passive, regardless of the other challenges it presents.

Besides, I hate the bugs...
Well mountain biking and kayaking aren't exactly cheap pursuits either, Warren. Just like skiing, they can be, but often aren't. As to why some people have a quiver of equipment and others don't, well, I'm not a shrink so who knows. Boys and their toys I guess. Besides, a quiver of skis and other athletic equipment is still cheaper than that Porsche 911 I keep threatening to buy someday!

I completely agree that golf is a passive sport, however, as an avid cyclist (on and off road), former inline skater (in my younger days I was a halfpipe/park rat), and self-described adrenaline junkie, I need something to do that has low odds of serious injury and/or death!

As far as adrenaline junkies go, any of you New Englanders ever been to or know of Red Rocks in Burlington, VT? Not to toot my own horn (ok, maybe a little ), but that's where the men get separated from the boys as far as adrenaline goes...If you know of the place, well, that big one takes some serious cojones, as well as a dearth of functioning brain cells!
post #24 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u
Well mountain biking and kayaking aren't exactly cheap pursuits either, Warren. Just like skiing, they can be, but often aren't. As to why some people have a quiver of equipment and others don't, well, I'm not a shrink so who knows. Boys and their toys I guess. Besides, a quiver of skis and other athletic equipment is still cheaper than that Porsche 911 I keep threatening to buy someday!

I completely agree that golf is a passive sport, however, as an avid cyclist (on and off road), former inline skater (in my younger days I was a halfpipe/park rat), and self-described adrenaline junkie, I need something to do that has low odds of serious injury and/or death!
I didn't say they weren't inexpensive I just haven't heard, as often, anybody saying, "I'm having a hard time pedaling up this hill... I need a new bike!"

Did the Porsche ('69 911E) thing. Learned a lot about fixing air-cooled boxer engines, mechanical fuel injection, timing chain tensioners, etc... Unless you're mechanically inclined, buy new!

BTW, I asked some golf friends of mine, who don't ski, what they did during the winter. Guess what? Billiards. Made perfect sense.
post #25 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
Skiing you can skid a turn and be fine, golf if you skid a stroke, you are in the woods.
Ahhh, but if you go in the woods skiing, you buy the farm. If you go in the woods golfing, you buy a stroke (and possibly a ball).

In skiing, it's pond skimming, in golf it's a 2 stroke penalty
post #26 of 35
Golf at home, ski on the road. We golf and tennis 12 months of the year here. We spend our vacation time and money flying to the ski areas so it's not really a fair comparison Some of you are lucky enough to live where you have a choice. There are a few avid outdoors types who bike and paddle all summer but when it's over 90 degrees f and 90% humidity golf may be all the activity you want in July and August.

I agree with the earlier posts that I enjoy the people I meet both golfing and skiing. Both are exclsively outdoors and beautiful. They're both sports you can enjoy for a lifetime and they're both sports you can enjoy by yourself, no team or opponent required. Both are sports where you compete with yourself and the course. Both have a "gear" aspect to them where everyone wonders if the latest and greatest is really better tan the stuff they bought last year. Wish I could do both more often!
post #27 of 35
I was already playing golf before the mountain closed for the year. The last week or so the slopes were (barely) open, the weather down on the courses was shaping up nicely.

I do both religously. Got over 100 days on snow and usually get over 100 rounds a summer in too.

As excellent as my skiing progressed this winter, my golf game is going in reverse this season.
post #28 of 35
why would any one want to chase a little white ball around, tyring to put in a hole just barely bigger,,,, then when you miss the shot, you get all kinds of teed off ( yes i know a pun ) lol
post #29 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tahoetr
why would any one want to chase a little white ball around, tyring to put in a hole just barely bigger,,,, then when you miss the shot, you get all kinds of teed off ( yes i know a pun ) lol
Because we need something to do with all that useless open space when it's not covered by snow...
post #30 of 35
Because it's one of the hardest things you will ever do. Some of us like being challenged.

There's a reason that nearly 90% of the golfing public can't and never will legitimitely break 100 on the course.
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