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Gear whores beware

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Man, did I make a mistake. I had an early 90s Bridgestone mountain bike that was still functional except one of the shifters was going out. After checking with the local shops that didn't stock any old 7 speed shifters I went out to eBay and found a nice set of LX shifters & brake levers which came with new cables. While at it I ended up with new cantilever brakes because I could get them cheaper than new brake pads.

Having never really worked on my bike I looked into what I needed to do to replace the shifters, brakes and all the cables. Next thing I know I decide it be best just to move everything to a new frame with a shock......my old Bridgestone was too big. I picked up a frame with a shock off eBay, bought a new bottom bracket, handlebar and stem and put the bike together.

When I took it out for its first ride I was surprised how well it road. Next thing you know I'm looking at upgrading it to 8 speeds on the rear & V brakes. But it doesn't stop there because I find myself looking at my good bike and wondering about upgrading it to disc brakes which would mean I'd have an extra set of wheels. Add in all the parts I'll have left over if I upgrade to 8 speeds and V brakes I almost will have enough parts for another bike so I find myself cruising for a crome-moly frame to put together another bike. Crap, its an addiction. Unlike skis you can do gradual upgrades to bikes so you can go broke in $10 to $100 increments. I am shocked Gonz has money for food. If you're a gear whore don't start working on your bikes because you'll find the internet makes it way too easy to spend money.
post #2 of 24
B'stone f+f 4 sale?
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch
B'stone f+f 4 sale?
21" Bridgestone MB-5 with rigid fork, stem, headset, Ritchey handlebar, STI 21-speed rapid-fire sifter (of which the right side works well but the left is funky) & whatever bottom bracket came with it. This was made the year they made their frames (except the very top-of-the-line) in Taiwan. Its Crome-moly and rode very smoothly. Unfortunately, I should have bought a 19" but didn't know any better back then. I'd be willing to donate it to a good home if it will be used. What would you do with it?
post #4 of 24
I'd make it into a rain bike/trailer tow rig. Except I take the same size as you.
post #5 of 24
there is not any "upgrade" available for a 7-speed, Rio.

in fact, there is not any "upgrade" that really works readily with a frame that old, apart from the one I'm about to share

my best and strongest advice would be to turn it into a singlespeed. if you'd like to do that, I can mail you a Surly Singleator, which basically bolts onto the derailleur hanger and has a spring-loaded single jockey wheel to maintain the tension that your derailleur normally puts on the chain.

for the rear, you can do one of two things: (1) keep the same freewheel cog cluster, and choose the one that gives the best chainline with your front chainwheel. this is the simplest route, but it doesn't give you any gearing flexibility to speak of. (2) remove the freewheel cog cluster and replace it with a single cog and spacers, again noting the proper place where the chainline runs straight and not deviating either outboard or inboard.

for the front, just use your middle ring if it's a 3-ring circus, or your small ring if it's a 2-ring circus.

you can continue running the same 7-speed chain. that's the same kind of chain that I use on my SS rig.

I can give more details and info in a PM if you like.

for mountain riding, 32t front x 20t rear is the most popular SS combo for our trails here, with 32t x 18t being second most popular, but better suited to those with the leg strength of Bode Miller or Eric Heiden.

for townie riding, errands, etc., you will probably prefer a ratio like 32t x 15t, or 34t x 15t.

Casey G might have experimented with SS, so you could ask him his thoughts for some more personal, conversational info.

final solutions are always sacrificial.

PS - My buddy Ezra stopped by to give me his old MB-1 frame last time he was passing through Zoola. he bought it new at a Sedona mtb shop back in the old days. It has a broken brake caliper post on the rear, and I'm gonna strip off the paint and braze on a new one for him. it's gonna be his townie bike. sweet old rig, I know exactly why you want to keep it.
post #6 of 24
I run into these issues in everything I do, from skis to bikes to cars to whatever...it's an addiction.

Its like Cocaine...It's Gods way of telling us that we have too much money.
post #7 of 24
Rio,

I've got an 8 speed gear cassette (shimano ultegra) Gears are 12-23 and a XTR triple front derailer (clamp on 31.5mm Clamp) I'm trying to unload.
post #8 of 24
My wife and I both have old MB-1's. We upgraded them for a while because we liked them so much. Her bike eventually ended up xtr 9 speed because she wouldn't hear of using another bike.

They were finally retired more or less, replaced by titanium, leaving generations of old parts in boxes. They are still used a lot as town/guest bikes. This year I think I'm going to put the original steel forks back on. Tom Ritchey always said there is a reason springs are not made from aluminum, and with an all steel no suspension rig you can really see what he was talking about.
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
dchan -

Thanks for the offer. I'm all set for upgrading to 8 speeds. My son trashed my rear derailluer & chain in the late 90s. The shop replaced them with an 8 speed chain and a derailluer that is 7/8 speed compatible. A friend had an old 8 speed cassette hanging around so all I had to pick up where some shifters. I'm trying not to put too much into this bike because its main purpose is for riding around town. I don't want to worry about expensive parts disappearing when I lock it up while in a store or restaurant.

Gonz -

I'm too lazy for doing single speed. Casey just put together a sweet Surly single-speed that he's proudly showing off at work.
post #10 of 24
be careful when using other folks' parts. drivetrains mate together over time, so that a rear cogset, front chainring set, and chain itself all get mated.

if you mix and match used drivetrain parts, you may have a lot of shifting frustration.

this is precisely why I say there really are not "upgrades" for 7-speed, because nobody's making a decent set of 7-speed kit of the EXTERNAL variety, although Shimano has an INTERNAL 7-speed "Nexage" rear hub that is current.

if someone like dchan has New Old Stock ("NOS") that is old model years but still unused, then you might be able to cobble together a nice working retro drivetrain.

I have two friends in Zoola who play retro for all it's worth. even the more die-hard one switched to 8-speed recently, due to the loss of repair parts availability for the external 7-speeds.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
dchan -

Thanks for the offer. I'm all set for upgrading to 8 speeds. My son trashed my rear derailluer & chain in the late 90s. The shop replaced them with an 8 speed chain and a derailluer that is 7/8 speed compatible. A friend had an old 8 speed cassette hanging around so all I had to pick up where some shifters. I'm trying not to put too much into this bike because its main purpose is for riding around town. I don't want to worry about expensive parts disappearing when I lock it up while in a store or restaurant.

Gonz -

I'm too lazy for doing single speed. Casey just put together a sweet Surly single-speed that he's proudly showing off at work.
Rio,

The hub on a 7 speed will not fit an 8 speed cassette. 8 and 9 are compatible on the same hub, but 7 is not compatible with those. You'll need an new wheel (or at least hub, but that's a lot of work).
post #12 of 24
oops. thanks John. that is the underlying assumption I'm using, and I didn't state it clearly.
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
All the drivetrain components are Shimano HG parts from the 90s so they should match. The old 8 speed cassettes from the 90s are suppose to fit on the same size hub as the 7 speed & from my measurements the cassettes appear to be the same width.
post #14 of 24
nope. they're not. 8 and 9 speed use a different hub that has a different width of carrier (where the cogset goes) and an overall wider axle/bearing spacing.

I went through all this with my old Miele Lupa road frame, which had excellent working 7 speed drivetrain and I wanted to go to the 8 speed rear for the closer spacing between gears (effective gear inch spacing, not physical distance between individual cogs).

I'm not saying you can't rig up something that might work, as my uber-retro friends have made some strange cobbled transmissions, but working on the repair stand and working reliably under load usually can't be reconciled.
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Oh well, I am getting the cassette on a hub with a bent rim. If necessary I'll learn the art of moving a rim over.....that should keep me busy between the end of biking season and the beginning of skiing. (And yes, they do have the same number of spokes.)
post #16 of 24
I'm officially ignoring this thread. I don't need another addiction...
post #17 of 24
one man's lifeblood is another man's addiction, coach.

maybe you could quit coaching?

naaaaaaaah.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Rio, the different hub width means that your newly acquired 8-speed stuff won't fit between the rear dropouts on the MB frame.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike

Rio, the different hub width means that your newly acquired 8-speed stuff won't fit between the rear dropouts on the MB frame.
Gonzo is right about that but it is not a big problem with a steel frame. Going from the 7-8 speed hub means going from 130mm to 135mm spacing I think. You can fit that right in with a little coaxing. You won't make quick Tour de France mechanic style wheel changes but that doesn't sound like your plan.

You can also "cold set" the rear triangle, a euphmism for giving it a heave and spreading it a few mm. If you don't feel like trying it go to someone who has worked on aligning frames. I have a steel road bike I had custom made in England in 1980 which has gone from a 5 to a 6 to 7 to a 8 to a 9 speed. For a spread like that you need to realign the deraileur hanger.

There are worse things to get roped into than base bevel.
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
The frame I have is actually built for a 135 hub but the 130 worked just fine in it so going up to a bigger hub is probably a good thing. So far all I'm out is the price of the 8-sp shifters which I can always donate to Phil if things don't work. (Is FLOA a registered charity?)
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
The frame I have is actually built for a 135 hub but the 130 worked just fine in it so going up to a bigger hub is probably a good thing. So far all I'm out is the price of the 8-sp shifters which I can always donate to Phil if things don't work. (Is FLOA a registered charity?)
We take all charitable donations, I can supply a receipt if needed .
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio
The frame I have is actually built for a 135 hub but the 130 worked just fine in it so going up to a bigger hub is probably a good thing. So far all I'm out is the price of the 8-sp shifters which I can always donate to Phil if things don't work. (Is FLOA a registered charity?)
whoa. that's perfect then. I could not recall the spacing differential, but if your frame is a 135, you're okay. how lucky is Rio? yeeeeeehaw.
post #22 of 24
ssssshhhh.... COLD SETTING IS AN ANCIENT ART PRACTICED BY WIZARDS. it is not mere bending.



Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog
Gonzo is right about that but it is not a big problem with a steel frame. Going from the 7-8 speed hub means going from 130mm to 135mm spacing I think. You can fit that right in with a little coaxing. You won't make quick Tour de France mechanic style wheel changes but that doesn't sound like your plan.

You can also "cold set" the rear triangle, a euphmism for giving it a heave and spreading it a few mm. If you don't feel like trying it go to someone who has worked on aligning frames. I have a steel road bike I had custom made in England in 1980 which has gone from a 5 to a 6 to 7 to a 8 to a 9 speed. For a spread like that you need to realign the deraileur hanger.

There are worse things to get roped into than base bevel.
post #23 of 24
Rio, do not look at this.
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
Very close but mine is in much better shape. The MB-5 had the same style paint job but in blue & gray. The components for the MB-4 & MB-5 were almost identical, LX & Ritchey.
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