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Giving us Greens? - Page 2

post #31 of 58
I used to use the green 'travel' trails to work on technique at slower speeds. That was until our SSD outlawed, in no uncertain terms, skiing whole trails switch while in uniform. Pfftt, there goes that idea...:

In all seriousness, I found that when I made the switch from teaching primarily adults to primarily kids, green trails all over the mountain were granted a new lease on life. Go watch an upper level kid ski a green trail -- boredom is the last thing that crosses their minds! They'll find every little serpentine offshoot, jib off snowguns (not recommended, of course), and generally play with the terrain. After a few seasons of that, I've never looked at beginner trails the same way.

Besides, think of it like this: How much fun is it for all you low handicappers' out there to go tear the pants off a Par 3 course? Same thing with green trails.
post #32 of 58
LM, what made you avoid the greens (meaning before your injury)? Was it just a boring thing, an ego thing, or some other motivation?
post #33 of 58
post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
lotta posts by wannabes in this thread, and you can spot them from a mile away.
You gotta wannabe if you ever wanna be. Then you gotta do sumpin about it.
post #35 of 58
I try to be nice to beginners on crowded trails and keep myself pasted to the edge of the green trail that's downhill towards the trees. Beginners tend to avoid the tree lined edge because it's scary so I don't ever have to cross paths with them. That reminds me, I was passing someone on a catwalk last time up and gave a courtesy, "on your left," call and they yelled at me. I always thought that was common ettiquite...
post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by pheft
You gotta wannabe if you ever wanna be. Then you gotta do sumpin about it.
the "doing sumpin about it" should consist of more than simply denigrating what you no longer want to be, though. right?

better said, let your skiing speak for you.
post #37 of 58
For many years I always made a point of my first run of the day being a "green" one, not to warm up, but just to get a feel for the skis. It was sort of an unwritten rule. These days I follow "the rule" when I go skiing with my kids or other friends who are not accomplished skiers. I no longer follow the rule when on my lonsome, but I still feel funny braking my own safety rule going down a blue run first thing in the morning. I like to explore, so I don't mind seeing what the long serpentine trail round the backside of the mountain looks like, so long as I don't have to skate too much.
post #38 of 58
I started to enjoy greens when shaped skis came along. I can have fun doing railroad turns on slopes that are pretty flat. I realize that my carving falls apart when the slopes steepen so next year I want to work on carving at slower speeds on greens and blues. Hopefully that will help me keep carving when the slopes get steeper.

I do love high speed skiing on rolling blues. I usually ski during the week when those slopes aren't crowded and I still love the exileration of that speed. Damn, I am really starting to miss it!! Lew
post #39 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
the "doing sumpin about it" should consist of more than simply denigrating what you no longer want to be, though. right?

better said, let your skiing speak for you.
Absolutely! There is nothing wrong with being a beginner. The turkeys that choose to put them down and even harass them are not wannabes, their just jerks. We're all just people and every one of those beginners is an expert in something that I can't handle at all. Some of them will be blowing me off the mountain in a couple of years.
post #40 of 58
that's what I meant, pheft.

a wannabe is not a want-to-be.

a wannabe is a poseur, all talk, not action.

strange the way slang departs from reality, I know.

here's a good one:

on MTBR.com, the teenagers now say you have been "p0wned" when someone throws a cut-down your way.

whatever that means.
post #41 of 58
and gonzo is exposed to the mysterious language of 1337...
post #42 of 58
According to the professional coaches who post in here, one should never give up skiing the green runs. A rule of thumb on terrain selection was posted in here a while ago: ski 20% of the time on easy, unchallenging terrain, 60% on terrain that matchs your ability, and 20% on terrain that is at the limit (or a bit overy) you abilities.
post #43 of 58
Green runs are a great place for strong skiers to experience the challenges of slow, precise skiing. For example, try doing RR tracks on flat terrain going slowly and you will experience 50-50 pressure distribution. Since things happen slowly you get to really tune into the move and experience it in "slow motion". Same goes for any other drill. On steep terrain things happen too fast and there are many distraction (such as survival ) to have this experience.

I think Arcmeister once told me: never miss taking advantage of a flat area!
post #44 of 58
Several years ago at summer camp I remember hearing a top Canadian freestyle team member say that he always makes his first run "an unbuckled greener". Basically he skis his first run on green terrain with his boots unbuckled, which really allows the skier to locate the sweet spot underfoot. The layout of Okemo is perfect for this drill, as you almost always have to ski the green Open Slope area in order to get to one of the chairs which takes you to the real skiing.

I'd be lying if I said I do this all the time on purpose...sometimes I'm still half asleep, poles in one hand, coffee in the other as I cut lazy unbuckled arcs en route to the summit chair!
post #45 of 58
going down great eastern to the skyeship in killington near the end of the day is VERY scarey-it has all been scraped down to ice and people that are learning are all over the place.
one of my green favorites up there is mouse run
nothing wrong with cruising blues, either!!!!!
always do one run down snowshed to remember how horrified i was once
post #46 of 58
If you want to get better you should use all the green and flat slopes you come to. Skate flat ( try using all 4 edges when skating) or easy pitched greens, one leg skiing on those same trails will really improve your balance and agility, do spin arounds and ski switch for a while when it is clear on the trail, you will really know where your edges are on that drill, i.e. you don't want any. I love skiing on greens and using them for my technique when I'm getting back to a lift to go ski the blacks.
post #47 of 58
I ski a lot of Greens on one ski just to practice balance (ok, and to show off to the green goblins a bit).

I also practice skiing switch on my twins on wide greens.

And in places like Vail, with some Greens that are long, wide, and steep enuff to be blues in many places, I like to just open it up (when it's not crowded of course).
post #48 of 58
I like to ski backwards and one ski (not at the same time, just got that idea as I composed this post, I will try it next winter). On one ski be sure you are carving clean arcs in both directions. Do it with legs crossed to show the goblins. They get a huge laugh when you fall down. When your legs are crossed you can change skis each turn,mix it up big toe edge to big toe or little toe edge to little toe edge (much harder). I'm working on one ski pointing forward, one backwards but I need to learn it on rollerblades first. I can do a narrow wedge now but want to get them parallel and carving! This might be risky for knee injury though.

I can't really "open it up" very far on greens. Need gravity to go fast!
post #49 of 58
I put my boots on my hands and ski down backwards, legs in the Lotus position, while singing Stairway to Heaven.
post #50 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
I put my boots on my hands and ski down backwards, legs in the Lotus position, while singing Stairway to Heaven.
don't forget to tell them who taught you that move, Bonni. :
post #51 of 58
I only ski triple blacks and will download before skiing a green run.
post #52 of 58
Download???!!: The one unforgivable sin is to download anywhere there is snow, now matter how gnarly or tame. None of the areas where I ski has triple blacks at the bottom, so, I am often faced with this dilema too, but a double black will do in a pinch.
post #53 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
I like to ski backwards and one ski (not at the same time, just got that idea as I composed this post, I will try it next winter).
I mastered one footed switch skiing on our teaching slope this season, mostly to entertain the kiddies during downtime. I never was able to link carved turns though...closest I came was carving in one direction and skidding in the other. It's also much harder when only wearing one ski, b/c if that boot hits the snow, fugghedaboutit!! :
post #54 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler
If you want to get better you should use all the green and flat slopes you come to. Skate flat ( try using all 4 edges when skating) or easy pitched greens, one leg skiing on those same trails will really improve your balance and agility, do spin arounds and ski switch for a while when it is clear on the trail, you will really know where your edges are on that drill, i.e. you don't want any. I love skiing on greens and using them for my technique when I'm getting back to a lift to go ski the blacks.
I'm trying to imagine using my outside edges to skate. Is it like making progress on a skateboard, skies parallel, or is it like doing some sort of a wierd cross-over dance step?
post #55 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni
I put my boots on my hands and ski down backwards, legs in the Lotus position, while singing Stairway to Heaven.
Touché, Bonnie! Hey, I actually got the idea to ski with legs crossed from an official PSIA-E publication "SnowPro". Some Norwegian instructors showed it to a visiting group of US telemark instructors (Mickey Stone wrote the article).

I saw a clip of a vintage ski film (looked like 1940's) with a guy "side surfing" (one ski forward, one back), he held one pole by the strap and spun it over his head like a scimitar.

So it's not Gaper Rod's crazy ideas, it's other guys' crazy ideas. I'm just dumb enough to try them, much to the delight of friends and strangers when I slam to the snow! When you fall skiing crossed legged, you go down hard! It's worth it though to see the smiles and hear the derisive laughter. How it rings in my ears!
post #56 of 58
There seems to be a case of political correctness going on here - are there advanced/experts here saying they'll willingly give up skiing blacks and double-blacks to spend considerable time on greens?
...Or are they saying they're working on their technique etc, on whatever green feeder trails bring them back to the lifts that serve the challenging runs?

Beginners and intermediates are pushing their abilities on the greens and blues. Advanced/experts are pushing theirs on the blacks and double blacks.
So why is the A/E characterized as macho, and not the intermediate or beginners?


I don't go to Whistler to ski greens.
There are plenty of double-blacks at Whistler, and I'm not going to apologize for skiing them.

For me the point of skiing is to have fun...so I ski where it's fun!
post #57 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
I'm trying to imagine using my outside edges to skate. Is it like making progress on a skateboard, skies parallel, or is it like doing some sort of a wierd cross-over dance step?
My 4 edge skating goes something like this: start off skating when you roll over the right ski and flex and extend off the left edge of right ski step onto the left edge of left ski and glide on that edge for just a second then roll that ski (left ski) from left edge to right edge on the glide while flexing then extending off the left ski to the right ski on its right edge then glide and roll right ski to left edge and repeat. It sounds much more complicated in written words than a visual demo would show. What I like about this drill is that it gets me working and in touch with all parts of the ski, shows if I'm in balance and the cross over from one edge of ski to other edge of the same ski is the turn initiation move.
post #58 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky
I only ski triple blacks and will download before skiing a green run.
Would that be backwards with hands in your boots while singing in the rain
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