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post #151 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
Have you heard Eva Cassidy (now deceased)? She is an exception and has gotten many people listening to music again. She has been an international phenom, though she died before her music got out. If you haven't heard her, pickup Songbird and be prepared to sit down, lower the lights, and really listen. If she is news to you, check her out on Allmusic.com. In fact, here is a link. Lew
Songbird has recently become a staple of high-end audio shows (my industry) in both Europe and the US. This album is an artistic tour-de-force. Over the past year, Eva's soothing sounds have eminated from more $100,000 show sytems than anything since Snorah Jone's first album.

It's refreshing to hear music that remindes us again why we got into this business. Love it!
post #152 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz
Ding Ding Ding - say the secret woid and win a hundred dollas!

That's right that is what I was singing - amazing!
I take paypal...

Both CaptnStrato and I are in the Audio (and for me now video) business. My wife is a singer and when people ask me what I play, I say "the stereo." IOW, I have no musical talent, but I am a great audience.

Cap'n, I only use Eva for demo for very special customers. I don't want to overplay her at the store. About 5 years ago a really nice guy bought some very good electronics from me. I bought him a copy of Songbird and he was so taken with her that he got together with a friend and has pursued a project to do a movie on her. Last I talked to him they had inked a deal with her family. If it all works out it won't be a big Hollywood deal. Best to ya'll, Lew
post #153 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Springhill Crazie
I'm sure someone will smoke it out.

God, any crediblity I had is now totally gone. I know, I know, can't lose what you never had.
I thought I was gone for the night, then I re-read this. "One Toke Over the Line" came into my head. That was another marginal group that I loved. Need to make a Brewer and Shipley road CD!! G'night. LewBob
post #154 of 221
who said music isn't a destination?

if I had no music to listen to, I'd be unbearable.

currently on play in my stereo: Queens of the Stone Age, Lullabies to Paralyze. Josh Homme is rewriting guitar rock, stand back and be awed by the textures and atmospheres he has created in the past 3 QOTSA albums.

following up on Eva Cassidy...

a shame I don't even know who she was especially because I grew up in Wash DC suburbs. I don't think there's an ox on the hill in Oxon Hill any more either.

as genre-crossing super-talented musical artists go, it seems Washington DC has had two fine ones die WAY too young during the past 10 years: Danny Gatton and Eva Cassidy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
Si, Now this thread is going someplace. We hijacked it!! It's a real shame that music isn't a destination any more. I took some of my old Tom Rush albums (the early, mostly acoustic ones) and burned them to CD. I plan to do that with some more of my old stuff. It makes great traveling music when I head up to the ski hills.

Have you heard Eva Cassidy (now deceased)? She is an exception and has gotten many people listening to music again. She has been an international phenom, though she died before her music got out. If you haven't heard her, pickup Songbird and be prepared to sit down, lower the lights, and really listen. If she is news to you, check her out on Allmusic.com. In fact, here is a link. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p...v7i a8g77r~T1 Lew
post #155 of 221

Zing!!!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
........
if I had no music to listen to, I'd be unbearable.
.......
You must not listen to much music then.





Gonz, you got to admit, you left yourself open on that one.

Keep smiling, I love your combative spirit.
post #156 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
Have you heard Eva Cassidy (now deceased)? She is an exception and has gotten many people listening to music again. She has been an international phenom, though she died before her music got out.
Oh yes, she is incredible. It's such a shame she left before her time. Several years ago a couple of the Boston-area alternative stations that weren't totally Clear-Channel walmart radio picked up on her cover of "Fields of Gold" from her "Live at Blues Alley" cd. I heard it once and jumped onto the web to buy it. LM gave me a couple of her other CDs a Christmas or two ago.
post #157 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
That was another marginal group that I loved. Need to make a Brewer and Shipley road CD
Wichi-tai-tai-to, baby! "Water spirit springing springing round my head, makes me feel glad that I'm not dead." Brewer and Shipley from the "Weeds" album if memory serves, before they got marginally famous with a top-40 "Toke".

to up the ante: anybody else hear the original version of Wichi-tai-to by Jim Pepper's Pow-Wow? I've still got the LP right here. Apparently originally a peyote chant from his grandfather. Another taken early, at 50 back in 92.
post #158 of 221
I am home now and had to return to this thread. Mark, thanks for the link to Jim Pepper. I have never heard of him. I knew there was a Native American link to that song, now I know more. I saw them live in Pocatello Idaho in '71 or so. They opened for Linda Ronstadt. She was terriible, but I was knocked out by B&S. They gave a memorable performance and I bought a number of their albums over the years. What kind of music are you listening to now? Maybe we should start a new thread where we turn each other on to some of the less commercial music that some of us are still managing to find.

Mark, do you have a CD recorder hooked up to your stereo? For that matter, do you still have a functioning turntable? I would really like to hear Jim Pepper's version if there were a way to get it onto your computer or a CD I could pick up. We have a place in Frisco and will be up this summer for sure.

And Gonzo, let me know what you think of Eva. Her version of Fields of Gold is something. Lew
post #159 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square
You must not listen to much music then.

Gonz, you got to admit, you left yourself open on that one.

Keep smiling, I love your combative spirit.
sometimes, T-Square, a guy has to stop pitching huge bending unseeable heaters and break out the tee-ball stand.

thanks for the chuckle.

and Lew, thanks for the Eva Cassidy. I visit All Music almost daily looking through their various sorting engines for music that sounds interesting. most of what I use the site for is rock music, though. haven't thought to use it for other genres. now I will.

anyone have Forever Changes by Love? I'd like to hear a non-paid review of that one.
post #160 of 221
Lewbob. the last time I checked, our turntable was functioning back at our place in Boston. Should be out here in a few weeks. We should get together when you're in Summit.
post #161 of 221
Ahhh, Brewer and Shipley...the sublime production on "Tarkio Road" was done by a fellow named Steve Barncard, once a producer and engineer at Wally Heider's during a golden age. He produced such gems as "American Beauty" by the Dead and David Crosby's first solo album "If I Could Only Remember My Name." Later he managed the A&M studios on the old Chaplin lot in Hollywood...after it was seperate from the label of the same name.
post #162 of 221
And didn't they move to your state and buy a farm? They were living somewhere in the midwest when they did Welcome to Riddle Bridge, one of their last. What is your connection to Barncard? I was one of those who loved to read liner notes and figure connections between different artists and their backup bands and sources for songs. Lew
post #163 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
I was one of those who loved to read liner notes and figure connections between different artists and their backup bands and sources for songs. Lew
PAST tense, Lew?
post #164 of 221
Good catch Gonzo. I still read the liner notes, but I am afraid the interest in who the back-up musicians and producers and song-writers are isn't quite the same. I'll give you an example: Fred Neil, an eclectic folk musician of the 60's wrote and sang a song called "Little Bit of Rain". Linda Ronstadt and the Stone Poneys covered it a few years later. When I heard her version I was surprised that the sound was so silmilar (arrangement, production, everything). The liner notes told the storey. Nick Venet was the producer on both albums and used many of the same musicians as back up when Linda did it. I got a big kick out of figuring things like that out back when we didn't have such a flow of information.

Today I am lucky just to find music that interests me or moves me in some way. I don't follow the back-up musicians as much, but I still read the liner notes if there is anything interesting about the artist. Lew

PS If you haven't heard of Fred, he was the one who wrote "Everybody's Talkin" that Harry Nillson sang for Midnight Cowboy. It was the perfect song for the movie, as Fred was a Florida boy who would come up to the Big Apple, fill the folk clubs, make an album, get wasted on drugs and drag himself back to Florida. If you remember, Florida was where Ratso and Jon V's character were heading when Ratso died at the end of the movie. Link: http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p...5e861v kjzzua
post #165 of 221
Thread Starter 
Everybody's Talking at me

I can't here a word they're saying

Only the echos of my mind.


Sounds pretty much like some threads here on Epic

I think I've still got a Linda Ronstadt album around somewhere. Hmm, maybe I'll have a beer and get it out.

As I think about the movie it makes perfect sense that a guy who was experienced in retreating to Florida wrote that. I could easily believe the director had a similar experience.
post #166 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
as genre-crossing super-talented musical artists go, it seems Washington DC has had two fine ones die WAY too young during the past 10 years: Danny Gatton and Eva Cassidy.
Isn't that the truth -- I lived in the Wash DC area during the 90s, and this thread brings back lots of memories. We spent most of our musical evenings out at One Step Down, but Blues Alley was always a treat.

Danny Gatton and Eva Cassidy were gems. We ran across them a couple of times. I remember when Eva died, although I didn't go to the Bayou show (I think that was her farewell? I had a baby at the time). It's funny about her legend growing: my own 64-year-old mother -- whom I don't think had ever in her life bought a CD, LP, 8-track, whatever -- somehow heard Eva last year, became smitten, and tracked down "Songbird."
post #167 of 221
Jim Pepper I believe was from Oregon, I heard him play live when I lived there in the early 70's. Jazz sax player. My band back then "After the Rain" played at a Native American traditional Salmon Bake on the Columbia River.

I think that the keyboard player on that record was Tom Grant who I studied with - he had a pretty successful carreer as a pioneer in what was later to become "smooth jazz."
post #168 of 221
Harumpfh!! Just when round 3 of a good mud-rasslin match is about to start------someone changes the subject

I'll just lurk for now, my musical knowledge is sorely lacking!
post #169 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
And didn't they move to your state and buy a farm? They were living somewhere in the midwest when they did Welcome to Riddle Bridge, one of their last. What is your connection to Barncard? I was one of those who loved to read liner notes and figure connections between different artists and their backup bands and sources for songs. Lew
I wouldn't be a bit surprised if they lived in the region. They still play around here often.

I met Steve through an unnamed online community about 15 years ago. What we had in common was that he's from Kansas City and that one of the artists he worked with at Heider's, was Finnegan and Wood (Mike Finnegan and the late Jerry Wood). If you read a lot of liner notes, you know who Mike is. Anyway, though originally from Ohio, Finnegan grew up in Wichita and briefly played basketball for the University of Kansas before returning to Wichita and devoting himself fully to music, founding The Serfs, who recorded one album for Columbia.

When I moved to Kansas in '80 he was nothing short of a legend around here. I became a fan, collecting his music. Much of my exposure to his music came through the performances of a guy from Lawrence, KS named Bill Lynch, a friend who later went on to be Bonnie Raitt's one-time boyfriend and the vocalist on "The Theme From Gary Shandling's Show" (no, that's not him doing the whistling, the trombone player on the session did that part). Bill also has the distinction of turning down a gig with a post-Lowell George Little Feat because by then he was clean and sober and they were anything but. Bill wound up collaberating with Finnegan when he relocated to L.A.

Steve shared with me some 2-track DAT mixdowns of the original 16-track sessions he recorded with Finnegan and Wood right before they were signed to Blue Thumb. In an act of corporate whatever, their contract stipulated they record with their producers in their choice of studios down in L.A. Steve's work with them, some superior to the eventual release and some not, never saw the light of day. I also have a fairly high-generation copy of Finnegan and Wood's never-released second album that I know almost nothing about. It's really outstanding in spite of the fact that Wood wasn't a tenth the singer that Mike was and is and that his guitar tones sound very dated to modern ears. The few times I've gotten to speak with Finnegan I've never taken the opportunity to ask him about that unreleased gem.

Finn went on to play keys and/or sing lead for The Jerry Hahn Brotherhood, the Dave Mason Band (check out mike singing "Goin' Down Slow" on "Dave Mason Live"), Dudek Finnegan and Kreiger, record two solo albums for Warner Brothers (one yeilding a near hit with his cover of the Soul Survivors' "Expressway") and one country album with his brother. He's been the longtime keyboard player in Steve Stills' band as well as CSN.

The last time I saw CSN, last year in Wichita, Finn was still regarded as an icon, receiving cheers during band introductions louder than any CSN themselves garnered. He feigns embarrassment well.

It's another story how I got to know David Crosby though it involves the same online community, mutual aquaintenceship with Steve Barncard and Mike Finnegan.
post #170 of 221
Hey Si.

Nillson Schmillson.
post #171 of 221
Da doo doo doo da di di di that's all I have to say to you
post #172 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky
Da doo doo doo da di di di that's all I have to say to you
And all you need to say?? . Busier at work today. I looked up some of the musicians mentioned on Allmusic. I will have to persue some Danny Gatton. BTW, JSTRAW, Brewer & Shipely moved to a Missouri farm. Wrong state, right region. Lew
post #173 of 221
Danny Gatton's 88 Elmira Street is valuable for its range and its liner notes, Lew. but the real deal, of course, was seeing him live. when I lived in upper NW DC, I wasn't far from Club Soda. Club Soda had Gatton there about monthly. I never went. I must now go sit in the corner with that conical cap.
post #174 of 221
DunCe.
post #175 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzostrike
Danny Gatton's 88 Elmira Street is valuable for its range and its liner notes, Lew. but the real deal, of course, was seeing him live. when I lived in upper NW DC, I wasn't far from Club Soda. Club Soda had Gatton there about monthly. I never went. I must now go sit in the corner with that conical cap.



We all have regrets of the opportunites we didn't take, and as I get older I get out less-especially as I became a parent late and my obligations changed. I did get to see Bonnie Raitt and Jackson Browne in a small club a number of years ago when they were fund raising for Ralph Nader. Lost cause, but one of the best nights of music I have had. I will try to get hold of a Danny Gatton CD.

My taste is more acoustic than hard rock, and I don't know where he fits in, but I will find out. Are you a fan of Ry Cooder? He did a wonderful album with an Indian Musician called "Meeting at the River" a few years back. It's a very interesting blend of American and Indian music, and Ry's son plays drums on it. Lew
post #176 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob



We all have regrets of the opportunites we didn't take, and as I get older I get out less-especially as I became a parent late and my obligations changed. I did get to see Bonnie Raitt and Jackson Browne in a small club a number of years ago when they were fund raising for Ralph Nader. Lost cause, but one of the best nights of music I have had. I will try to get hold of a Danny Gatton CD.

My taste is more acoustic than hard rock, and I don't know where he fits in, but I will find out. Are you a fan of Ry Cooder? He did a wonderful album with an Indian Musician called "Meeting at the River" a few years back. It's a very interesting blend of American and Indian music, and Ry's son plays drums on it. Lew
I'd happily burn you a copy, Lew, as long as you eventually buy one for Danny's estate's sake. Like many brilliant, passionate people, Danny suffered from depression and took his own life. His family were never well off and were probably at least temporarily financially devastated by the act. but if you'd like a copy to hear in the meantime while you search, PM me and I can mail you a CD.

yep, I like Ry. I really like Bop 'til You Drop even though the production is muddy. I love Buena Vista Social Club. but I need to listen to more.

right now I'm listening to Tom Freund, North American Long Weekend. know that one?

small club trivia... being a rock fan most of my EUREKA!s are rock shows.

10,000 Maniacs were an outstanding band before they became a "pop" act. I saw them many times at Club 9:30 in DC.

Richard Thompson at the Bayou, a place segbrown already mentioned.

Television at Georgetown University's small acoustic theater/hall.

Robyn Hitchcock & The Egyptians also at the same Gtown venue.

Eleventh Dream Day were positively incendiary at 9:30 in DC. Same for the Mekons, the Meat Puppets... during 1981-1986 I saw many outstanding shows in DC and at the Birchmere in Arlington VA.

best Birchmere show probably was Boiled in Lead, the version that had Todd Menton, Anders, Drew Miller & David StensHoel. unreal. see From the Ladle to the Grave. when I saw them 2 years later with a new guitarist and fiddler, they were like AC/DC with a vioilin... nothing interesting at all.

Richard Buckner at Mercury Lounge in NYC several times, every time revelatory. He is amazing.

Cheri Knight at Mercury Lounge in NYC, backed by essentially the reformed Blood Oranges. impossible to describe, awestriking.

want-to-see:

Mark Eitzel, either solo or with American Music Club reformed.

Mark Kozelek/Red House Painters.
post #177 of 221
I would love it if you would burn me a copy. And I will buy a copy if I like it. I understand wanting to support the artist or artist's estate. I have made samplers for friends over the years, knowing that if they like some of the people I turn them on to they will search out their albums.

I think my taste is more mellow than yours, but when you brought up Richard Thompson, that me think of another gem of an album that some one gave me a few years ago: Clive Gregson and Christine Collister both played with Richard, then eventually went out on their own. They did an album called "Love is a Strange Hotel" that is a favorite of mine. It is mostly covers, nicely done, of songs from a variety of sources from Jackson Brown to Merle Haggard. Christine has a haunting voice. That is an album I make a point of copying for friends because it is out of print. Got to keep the music alive!! Lew
post #178 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob
I would love it if you would burn me a copy. And I will buy a copy if I like it. I understand wanting to support the artist or artist's estate. I have made samplers for friends over the years, knowing that if they like some of the people I turn them on to they will search out their albums.

I think my taste is more mellow than yours, but when you brought up Richard Thompson, that me think of another gem of an album that some one gave me a few years ago: Clive Gregson and Christine Collister both played with Richard, then eventually went out on their own. They did an album called "Love is a Strange Hotel" that is a favorite of mine. It is mostly covers, nicely done, of songs from a variety of sources from Jackson Brown to Merle Haggard. Christine has a haunting voice. That is an album I make a point of copying for friends because it is out of print. Got to keep the music alive!! Lew
synchro.

guess who opened for RT at that Bayou show?

one of the best cover book albums I know of is Fakebook by Yo La Tengo. I have seen them live more than any band except the Dead... probably 12-15 times. they are musical soulmates of mine. the cover album is fine fine fine.
post #179 of 221
Clive and Christine opened for RT rather than backing him? That must have been one hell of a show!! I have a friend who is into Yo La Tengo big time. I will have to borrow a few of his. Lew
post #180 of 221
Boy, has this thread been hijacked!!
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