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Tyler Found Guilty...

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 19
Still Olympic champion!
post #3 of 19
Cheater
post #4 of 19
Disbelief here.

Tyler Hamilton is a natural talent with strong character and commitment, proven over many hard years in elite level cycling. This isn't some baseball player who comes out of nowhere and bulks up 50 lbs. over the summer to smash homers.

I haven't immersed myself in the technical details of the testing, but as long as Tyler maintains a plausible argument on the merits, I just cannot believe (a) he would be tempted to dope, (b) he would be weak enough, or stupid enough, to give in to temptation. I think he still deserves the benefit of the doubt - it was a split arbitration decision -- and I can't help thinking the euros at UCI who set this in motion were not happy to see yet another yank emerging to dominate in the post-Armstrong era.

Obviously I'm not fully informed and this is really a subjective assessment - so those who are convinced he's a doper, fire away.
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01
I can't help thinking the euros at UCI who set this in motion were not happy to see yet another yank emerging to dominate in the post-Armstrong era...
Yeah, I blame the euros too.
post #6 of 19

Not suprised

Tyler is a doper.

A couple of his teammates tested positive for the same thing which in my view really weakened his defense, that called for a one in a million chance of him being a genetic chimera with two distinct blood cell lines.

It was nice to have him around, but he's done. It's too bad, he sure does seem like a nice guy. Then again, maybe he shouldjust admit it and write a book about him. Perhaps the fans would embrace him like they did Richard Virenque.
post #7 of 19
The split decision was from the US anti-doping agency. The original basis was from samples taken in Spain. If one set of samples from Athens hadn't been destroyed, he might well have been stripped of his Olympic medal as well.
post #8 of 19
http://www.tylerhamilton.com/

The extortionist? Never heard about that.
post #9 of 19
Probably the leading authority in America on the subject, Jim Stray-Gunderson, testified in his defense. He was in town last week for a presentation on altitude training and said the numbers and amounts of second population blood cells were not plausible....he would have to get a shot glass of second blood every few weeks, which would not help an athlete. Why would he do that? The second population blood from Spain didn't match the Olympic sample.

It goes to the International Court of Sports Arbitration from here.

My take is that new and unreliable testing ruined the career of a good guy. Meanwhile, Paris Roubaix was won by Tom Boonen, who got off his bike and rushed to hug Johan Museeuw, who was proven in phone tapes to be a doper and not supposed to be around.
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat
Yeah, I blame the euros too.
Fox, I have to assume you're just joking and see the double-entendre now. But no pun intended - I meant the good people of Switzerland or France or whoever controls UCI, not the currency!

Though truth be told, on the currency front -- Hamilton had a pretty slick marketing machine set up. So good, in fact, that I really doubt he would've risked the good thing he had going.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01
Disbelief here.

Tyler Hamilton is a natural talent with strong character and commitment, proven over many hard years in elite level cycling. This isn't some baseball player who comes out of nowhere and bulks up 50 lbs. over the summer to smash homers.

I haven't immersed myself in the technical details of the testing, but as long as Tyler maintains a plausible argument on the merits, I just cannot believe (a) he would be tempted to dope, (b) he would be weak enough, or stupid enough, to give in to temptation. I think he still deserves the benefit of the doubt - it was a split arbitration decision -- and I can't help thinking the euros at UCI who set this in motion were not happy to see yet another yank emerging to dominate in the post-Armstrong era.

Obviously I'm not fully informed and this is really a subjective assessment - so those who are convinced he's a doper, fire away.
I see two ways of reconciling UCI's decision.

1) Tyler is innocent. It's rigged to deflate American Cycling Power.

2) Tyler is guilty. It's further evidence of the extent to which blood doping and chemical enhancement have pervaded pro cycling.

Being a realist where this issue of artificial enhancement is concerned, I have to think that (2) is closer to the truth and more likely what is. In other words, artificial enhancement is SO PERVASIVE that a cyclist MUST use it to remain competitive.

In the short term UCI achieves a Public Relations Goal by suspending Tyler. But in the long run, it ignores the problem by simply scapegoating Tyler.

Bad move, UCI. Bad move.

In other news, The Lance is retiring after the '05 TdF.
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic
Tyler is a doper.

A couple of his teammates tested positive for the same thing which in my view really weakened his defense, that called for a one in a million chance of him being a genetic chimera with two distinct blood cell lines.

It was nice to have him around, but he's done. It's too bad, he sure does seem like a nice guy. Then again, maybe he shouldjust admit it and write a book about him. Perhaps the fans would embrace him like they did Richard Virenque.
yup. fans will embrace Tyler and all other top cyclists who supplement their physical training with chemicals... AS SOON AS the UCI comes out and admits the problem is so pervasive that they can't stop it with random suspensions of this sort.
post #13 of 19
Remember, Allan Baxter lost his bronze medal for using a nasal spray and Hans Knaus got a year for being 1.2 points (I dont know the units) about the allowed norm (3) where the point of becoming effective is 50. The whole system is out of whack.
post #14 of 19
newfydog
Quote:
Tom Boonen, who got off his bike and rushed to hug Johan Museeuw, who was proven in phone tapes to be a doper and not supposed to be around
Hum, and what about lance Armstrong and Michele Ferrarri ?

Gonzostrike
Quote:
In other words, artificial enhancement is SO PERVASIVE that a cyclist MUST use it to remain competitive.
.
Quote:
fans will embrace Tyler and all other top cyclists who supplement their physical training with chemicals... AS SOON AS the UCI comes out and admits the problem is so pervasive that they can't stop it with random suspensions of this sort.
Agreed. I have a feeling that pro-cycling is so challenging for the human body that a chemical preparation is actualy necessary for the own good of pro riders. They put so much stress on them during training and racing that they can't restore their balance by natural means. A sad but direct conscequence of being part of a highly competitive professional sport : they're ruining their health for our viewing pleasure.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR
A sad but direct conscequence of being part of a highly competitive professional sport : they're ruining their health for our viewing pleasure.
EXACTLY, philippe. that's exactly where I was headed with that. you understand what makes me call it shortsighted and also what makes me think it somewhat malevolent.
post #16 of 19
OK, allow doping but don't think sponsors are going to foot the bill. Would you buy a Festina watch just because it runs fast or do you want to know what time it really is? I got a phone from Tmobile because the other ones weren't cheaper and I like Vino, Jan, Kloeden, Kessler, etc. If they are on dope, I'll get AT&T or whatever. Why do I want a dopey phone? Hey Camelback can make an IV feed with hydration, red blood cells, meth, adrenaline released over the course of the ride. You think racing is killing riders now? "The Gladiator" took a flyer today, on a solo break as I type. Not to cast aspersion on Tafi, but the name makes me think... Gladiators, riders dropping at the side of the road every race, it will happen without doping control, and the sport will become more popular no doubt.
post #17 of 19
I love to watch competitive cycling and I was a huge fan of Tyler's, but I have to agree with Gonzo. On the other hand, the only artificial aid that would help my own riding is a pair of control-top bib shorts.
post #18 of 19
If you agree with gonzo why WERE you a huge Tyler fan? Why past tense?
post #19 of 19
Check out Summer Revolution tonight at 9 eastern time on OLN if you still care. Weekly news and racing highlights.
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