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Transfering skills

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
On Monday I was in a truck stop getting a cup of coffee to go. I had a 20oz coffee full to within a quarter inch of the top. I never put a lid on a coffee as it seems to spill when I take the lid off. I walked to the cash register at normal walking speed as usual.

A woman standing there observing this commented " You must be heavy into marshal arts to be able to carry that cup of coffee like that without spilling a drop." Until that point I had not given it a second thought. I explained that I ski and she said "the moves must be similar to marshal arts, you can separate different movements in your body".

I then walked to my van but was tuning into what was happening. The coffee stayed still like it was on a table using upper and lower body separation. The motion felt a bit like mogul skiing and the coffee was in the correct position to hold a pole.

This points to the fact that the marshal arts would be a good way to stay in tune with skiing in the off season. So would carrying full cups of cold water.
post #2 of 18
Wait till you get a little older, Pierre, and your hands shake regardless of how smoothly your core moves.
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
Wait till you get a little older, Pierre, and your hands shake regardless of how smoothly your core moves.
ROFL I have seen older people just cussing up a storm trying to get a lid on their coffee because of shaking. I suppose my skiing will be shaky some day.
post #4 of 18
A couple weeks ago on a beautiful spring day, I got a cup of coffee and rode the chair lift. It was about half full when I got to the top. I skied over to some friends who started laughing; I turned around to see what they were laughing at, then realized it was me with the coffee.

We took off and I went into the mogul field with the coffee in hand, granted with a lid on it but it was open. Ski down about 100 yards and pulled out - not a drop spilled. I announced that I hadn't spilled a drop. The only congrats I got was, "yah, but you had a lid on it."
post #5 of 18
So Pierrie, do you have a tai chi chaun class in your future? Later, RicB.
post #6 of 18
Tend to agree strongly. Shotokan karate training is done with lots of stretching and very low stances to build strength and articulation. You won't necessarily fight from those stances but they do help in developing tremendous "core strength".

When I trained in Kung Fu, hours were spent on balance exercises and holding stances. The worst were done on a cut log, stand on one leg that's slightly bent at the knee with the other foot slightly above and forward (cat stance) .... now hold that position for fifteen minutes as you start to shake and the log begins to dance.

The bad news for me, was that after a major auto wreck I now have a severe tremor across my right side. I can't even brush my teeth without the toothbrush ending up in my ear. I'll never consume soup, peas, or rice in public again. "Need a drink buddy" .... God I hate being asked that.

The good news is that all of that training, despite the wreck and a few other medical problems ..... I can still ski, granted that I am now "running on borrowed time", from the muscle and primary balance skills of the training.

Even posting this is a problem. The hand tremor causes me to hit multiple letters .... kinda' like stuttering on the keyboard.
post #7 of 18

story of strength

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Tend to agree strongly. Shotokan karate training is done with lots of stretching and very low stances to build strength and articulation. You won't necessarily fight from those stances but they do help in developing tremendous "core strength".

When I trained in Kung Fu, hours were spent on balance exercises and holding stances. The worst were done on a cut log, stand on one leg that's slightly bent at the knee with the other foot slightly above and forward (cat stance) .... now hold that position for fifteen minutes as you start to shake and the log begins to dance.

The bad news for me, was that after a major auto wreck I now have a severe tremor across my right side. I can't even brush my teeth without the toothbrush ending up in my ear. I'll never consume soup, peas, or rice in public again. "Need a drink buddy" .... God I hate being asked that.

The good news is that all of that training, despite the wreck and a few other medical problems ..... I can still ski, granted that I am now "running on borrowed time", from the muscle and primary balance skills of the training.

Even posting this is a problem. The hand tremor causes me to hit multiple letters .... kinda' like stuttering on the keyboard.
Yuki, yours is a story of strength of multiple disciplines. The mind AND the body. Your story actually uplifted my spirits, not because of the condition you are in, by no means, it was how you are DEALING with it. You have a strength that many lack. One that comes from within. Anyone can lift weights, my friend, you have lifted your spirit!

Congratulations and fight the good fight. I would love to see your comments as a separate post....Tell us how you do it, Its very inspiring all around. Humble soup is good for us now and again.

If anyone asks about the peas...tell them what happened. They might eat some Humble soup too, its good for them. Show them that youll never give up. To quote Danny Kay, "Christopher Columbus never gave up, Benjamin Franklin never gave up, Oliver Twiddledee...whos he? you see, you dont know cause he gave up!"

Keep it light, keep it tight.
post #8 of 18
See if you can still do it after drinking the 20 oz of coffee.
post #9 of 18
Yuki, what did you mean by "borrowed time?" Is your skiing career going to be closed out at some point?

JoeB
post #10 of 18
A long time ago, we had a thread in Health and Fitness about Skiing and martial arts. If anything, martial arts does teach you to fall. Also, martial arts practitioners have the lowest incidence of ACL injury.
post #11 of 18
Is there one form of martial arts that is recommended for aspiring skiers? Or are they all equally effective?
post #12 of 18
Yuki, ask for soups in a cup instead of a bowl. Use the left hand to eat peas with a spoon. Above all, don't worry about what others see while you enjoy your meals.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarCube
Is there one form of martial arts that is recommended for aspiring skiers? Or are they all equally effective?
My only expereince is with Yang style tai chi chaun. There are many other stylkes of tai chi t ochos from. Tai chi is excellent for transfer to skiing. I think any martial art that is internaly focused and progressives from slow deliberate movements to build structural awareness would be good. I understand that akido is practiced in the Aspen ski school. Maybe Weems could verify this. Later, RicB.
post #14 of 18
I believe Weems's friend Tom Crum uses Aikido in his The Magic of Skiing clinics, which Weems has coached, and Magic of Golf clinics. http://www.aikiworks.com/
post #15 of 18

I dont drink coffee, tee please...

Any marshal arts will be good from the fitnes aspect. I used to practise shotokan for many years and the low stance yuki mentioned really was a strain to hold but rewarded in a strong ki. We never made any contact so we followed our movements all the way through. Had to quit because of other sports but you really cannot beat martial arts for overall aerobic fitnes, fast reactions, cordination and selfconfidence.
post #16 of 18
Thanks, RicB...I was afraid my question had been lost in this thread. I've been doing some research on martial arts and, in particular, tai chi. Looks like something I'd like to try for overall health and skiing-related skills. I've studied kickboxing from tai kwan do instructors though not since I've attempted skiing. Don't know as much about aikido, and I'm willing to learn--thanks for the tip!
post #17 of 18
Yes Pierre - I was once asked by a dance coach how long I had danced for (ball room stuff) .... I had to confess I don't dance.... she had watched me bend & collect a medication chart from a bed end.... & was surprised at my upper body position as I did so given my lack of dancing.... I had to confess to being a fencing student - another sport with good awareness of upper body & connection to legs....
post #18 of 18
I think any martial art would be good for conditioning and balance. I've done Shorin Ji Ryu Karatedo for many years. I also practiced Daoist Tai Chi for about three years(until a new job in another city took me away in location, not only in terms of location, but also in time management sense). Many people, especially older people (the younger ones had very good balance to begin with), observed that their balance had makedly improved from doing Tai Chi. They said activities such as walking on ice, slippery rocks on the sea shore etc. was much easier and safer.

It is pretty amazing how much of their lives the long-time members of the Daoist Tai Chi society have given to Daoist Tai Chi, and the society set up by Mr. Moi.
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