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A few unknown terms from a newbie

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Hello..As I mentioned in a post a few days ago I am relatively new to Alpine Skiing. I hear conversations among skiers on the slopes and message boards and often hear terms used that I am unfamiliar with. I found a ski dictionary online but there are still a few terms that are not listed that I am curious about.
.................................................. ................................................

Bumps -

When someone talks about 'bumps' are they referring to moguls? I hear things like "...this ski does good in the bumps" etc..

Glades -

I have no idea what this means.

Moguls -

I know what the defintion is but are moguls manmade objects or do they refer to any time of terrain that has the characteristics?

Jib...Jibbing:

I hear this mentioned in freestyle discussions but have no idea what they are talking about.

Rollers:

I take it these are the little rolling hills lined up on terrain?

Snow snake:

From what I read I take it this has something to do with falling down.


Wash-out:
???


Thanks to anyone who can respond.
post #2 of 27
Xman,

You're guessing good!

Bumps - yes these are moguls

Glades - runs with trees on them

Moguls - can be man made, but are mostly made by skiers turning in the same spot.

Jib...Jibbing - riding over objects like rails, small trees etc.

Rollers - are typically large snow making piles - if you go over them slowly enough you will stay on the ground - if you go fast enough you will get air

Snow snake - an evil creature that gets blamed for all falls that were not caused by poor skiing technique

Wash-out - when one end of your skis/board (usually the tails) starts to skid
post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkierXMan
Snow snake:
From what I read I take it this has something to do with falling down.
I will answer this one for you. Snow Snakes are extremely dangerous critters. They are NOT venimous but instead are invisible, highly agile, they most often inhabit deep powder and moguls, but have been known to pop up anywhere there are skiers. They know both Karate and Judo. Snow snakes reach up and bite a skier by the ankle (or by the boot or ski if they miss the leg) and throw the skier to the ground when the skier least expects it. Snow snakes keep score amongst themselves and at the end of the day the snake with the most downed skiers gets to drink at the expense of the other snakes who did not trip up as many skiers.
I hope you find this answer informative both for explaining "Snow snakes" and for explaining why you fell last time out.
post #4 of 27
When you have your first "yard sale", you will find out how evil the dreaded snow snake really is.

Wait till you encounter "death cookies" or "Sierra Cement" ....
post #5 of 27
I'll offer a different definition of roller than therusty.

We call snow making piles "Whales" and they can be pretty severe on occasion.

A roller is terrain that drops away fairly gently, could be manmade like a snow making "whale" or not. Think of a wide shallow stair step type of terrain. If you are familiar with Okemo in VT---there are lots of rollers there. They can be a lot of fun.
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Wait till you encounter "death cookies" or "Sierra Cement" ..
When you do, you may end up "over the handlebars".
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Wait till you encounter "death cookies" or "Sierra Cement" ..

Yep and to add to Coach's thought you may throw one hell of a "Roostertail "
post #8 of 27
Hit that Sierra Cement and go over the handle bars and you will look like a Gaper. Ahhhhh I mean a poser. Gaper=clueless tourist and Poser = Vain Gaper wannabe: Ahhhh Septic for you folks down under
post #9 of 27
What's the precise definition of a "core shot?"
post #10 of 27
snow snake also a burried branch or root that cannot be seen, but can trip you up as you ski off the trail to avoid the ski school traversing the run.
post #11 of 27
core shot: (n.): 1. a gouge in the base that goes clear through the ptex and into the core of the ski. Usually accompanied by a horrible scraping sound, which is immediately followed by a number of expletives and the realization that one should have brought the rock skis. 2. another $35. out of my pocket- more difficult and expensive to repair than the usual shallow scrape.
post #12 of 27
Is there a thread of legitimate (and maybe humerous) skiing terms?

It might be funny and informative to get one going in another thread.
post #13 of 27
We have a similar animal down under called the drop bear, a distant relative to the koala. It is known to inhabit trees and "drop-down" on the unsuspecting. I blame a drop bear for my skiing fall last September when I did my shoulder.
post #14 of 27
Yes, there are. You'll find hundreds of terms. Just do a search on some of the terms you have just learned. I think there is a currently active thread regarding the terms used for ice.

BTW, Snow snakes also love to hang out in the hundreds in the "Coral reef" snow. It's really ugly. You don't want to go there or you may end up throwing a shoe and doing a bloody face drag.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre
Hit that Sierra Cement and go over the handle bars and you will look like a Gaper. Ahhhhh I mean a poser. Gaper=clueless tourist and Poser = Vain Gaper wannabe: Ahhhh Septic for you folks down under

No we would call a Gaper a Punter.... (they are punting on the snow conditions - like do we have any - versus the "locals" who are the punters who have worked at the resort for a week)

Septic -no no no... we be aussies so it is Seppo (like the TV is a tele & we BBQ on a barbie ... everything MUST end in "ee" "o" sounds)

Yes - you lot here are nearly all Seppos... (Irul may kindly explain rhyming slang for you - or Fox or one of the Pom's that invented it)
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp
core shot: (n.): 1. a gouge in the base that goes clear through the ptex and into the core of the ski. Usually accompanied by a horrible scraping sound, which is immediately followed by a number of expletives and the realization that one should have brought the rock skis. 2. another $35. out of my pocket- more difficult and expensive to repair than the usual shallow scrape.
$35? Mine cost me just south of $80!

BTW - Was "Yeti" replaced by "Gaper"? What is "Gaper" really refer to (other than people on here, according to the TGR crew)?
post #17 of 27
SPORE = Stupid People On Rental Equiptment
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkierXMan
Hello..As I mentioned in a post a few days ago I am relatively new to Alpine Skiing. I hear conversations among skiers on the slopes and message boards and often hear terms used that I am unfamiliar with. I found a ski dictionary online but there are still a few terms that are not listed that I am curious about.
.................................................. ................................................

Bumps -

When someone talks about 'bumps' are they referring to moguls? I hear things like "...this ski does good in the bumps" etc..

Glades -

I have no idea what this means.

Moguls -

I know what the defintion is but are moguls manmade objects or do they refer to any time of terrain that has the characteristics?

Jib...Jibbing:

I hear this mentioned in freestyle discussions but have no idea what they are talking about.

Rollers:

I take it these are the little rolling hills lined up on terrain?

Snow snake:

From what I read I take it this has something to do with falling down.


Wash-out:
???


Thanks to anyone who can respond.
They use bumps because they think that using an erudite word like Mogul is pretentious. The French use Bosse. Jibbing is a sailing term. When I first saw your title, I thought of that term first in jest. It actually derives from the fact that ski professionals took up windsurfing in their off season and then started to use the terms slopeside. The same goes for rollers. It's a surfing term. Glades wouldn't be common in the West so I assume you are from the far west. Once you learn this word, I suggest you try Dingle.
post #19 of 27

Giving your local yokel approach away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Warp daddy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuki
Wait till you encounter "death cookies" or "Sierra Cement" ..

Yep and to add to Coach's thought you may throw one hell of a "Roostertail "
The first two are strickly western terms and the last more of an eastern one. Sierra Cement has come into vogue recently in the east, but it was originally just cement. Boiler plate would be a patch of ice. Often they use blue ice as a descriptive term which is a synonym.
post #20 of 27
We've had "death cookies" in the east for---I don't know---maybe---forever:
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j
We've had "death cookies" in the east for---I don't know---maybe---forever:
Every winter, anyway.
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info everyone...

one more....What is P Tex? Is it the black material on the bottom of the skis?
post #23 of 27
Ok swiftie, we stand corrected. Yep we have been guilty of stealing the Sierra Cement" term from the western folks. Death cookies however are eastern or universal and come from from grooming under damp to frozen conditions.

Boiler plate is a patch? Boiler plate can be the whole damnded hill.

Who coined the term "mashed potatos" (and an "e" if Republican)? I'd swear that it was my mom. Please enlighten us, but I'll concede that it was your mom right now to save you the trip to your diary.

Hey! I've given advice to the experts too. Once I was at a buffet with Stein and he was contemplating the relish selections. I told him the Kosher dills were pretty good.

Now please, please, entertain us with an comparative analysis of the Swix versus the Tongar methods to prep those parabolics. To ensure total accuracy, just scan both pamphlets to reduce any chance of error. Also be sure to pass it around among the other inmates for peer review.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHedgie
Every winter, anyway.
he he
post #25 of 27
Jibing is a downwind turn in sailing. Jibbing is from snowboarding, has nothing to do with wind, turning or skiers windsurfing.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkierXMan
Thanks for the info everyone...

one more....What is P Tex? Is it the black material on the bottom of the skis?
Yep. P-tex is the stuff the bases of your skis are made of. It's actually a pretty amazing material. It's flexible (at least to the degree to which your skis can be flexed), it's wax-absorbent to help it's snow sliding qualities, and -- best of all ! -- it's softer then every rock. stick and leaf littering the trail, which quickly leads to the aforementioned "core shots". :
post #27 of 27
I prefer the term "chicken heads" to "death cookies".
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