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Help with instep room in boots

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I have a pair of Lange AC8's that fit great length and width-wise but have a massive amount of space on top of my foot and in front of the ankle. When I step into the empty shell barefoot, there is over 1.5 inches between the top of my foot and the shell, buckled in the first position. There is maybe 1/8 inch of space above my toes but then it increases to over 1.5 inches when it reaches my ankle. The result is that my foot can easily slide forward when I'm fully buckled.

Does anyone have a good solution for this problem? I thought about bontex shims under the liner but it would be impractical to fill that much space. The only way I can think of is to put some dense padding over that part of the tongue to increase the thickness by about 1/2 inch. I would need something that is very dense and incompressible yet flexible. Maybe 1/8 inch vinyl from a mat? Any ideas?

Thanks!
post #2 of 29
Try using a product called an "Eliminator". It is a shim that is shaped like a
boot tongue and should provide "fill in" over the instep and ankle area. In extreme cases, the liner can be "modified" with additional padding in the instep area and ankle area.(either externally or internally) Also, the tongue of the liner can be modified with additional padding. (either externally or internally)
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
I've actually used the "Eliminator" tongue before. I found that it was great for securing the lower leg, but not the foot. The part that goes over the instep was thin and very soft so it may have felt better but did little to secure the foot. Also, the tongue is quite thick around the calf so it decreased forward lean significantly, which I didn't want.

I will probably have to pad my liner tongue with a dense material. Something like hard rubber or vinyl should do the trick I hope.

Thanks.
post #4 of 29
I know there will be those who disagree, but if I were you and I was really happy with the Lange shells then I would get some custom liners done. All of these fit problems you have been posting about are all handled by a new liner. You can search on opinions on the available liners, but my personal preference is an Intuition Alpine liner. Their Ultralon foam is much stiffer than the original Thermoflex type liners. They sell their liners in multiple thicknesses (I have both 14mm and 10mm). The 14mm liner (with the Custom Power Wrap) would easily fill the instep void and provide an incredibly high performance fit. Don't let anyone discourage you who hasn't personally tried one of the current Intuition liners. This will set you back by about $125 - $180 bucks though.
post #5 of 29
You need some heat moldable foam to form a pad to fit in your sock and fill the void. I have nitrogen filled prosthesis grade foam in two densities that will do the job well. I use it myself, and I have some for sale. PM me if interested. Later, RicB.
post #6 of 29
Do to very flat feet, I have a similar problem. Bondtex helps some. I agree about the custom Liners (I have Intuition liners), but a custom footbed can also help out quite a bit. If made correctly this can position your foot well and help take up the extra volume in the instep. See a good Bootfitter.
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
Where can I get these Intuition Alpine Ultralon liners? I need something fairly firm and thickness above the instep but it needs to be very thin at the sides of the feet as I already have such a tight fit there.

I already have cork custome footbeds, Surefoot I believe.

Thanks for all the help.
post #8 of 29
Get some new boots that fit you better initially.
post #9 of 29
I would agree with Atomicman. If there is that much room in the shells to begin with, they are not the right boots for you. Even if you find a solution, it will undoubtedly involve adding large amounts of padding, and it is unlikely that it will result in boots that perform well. Your boots are the connection between your body and your skis, and you don't want any more slop than absolutley necessay.
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot
I would agree with Atomicman. If there is that much room in the shells to begin with, they are not the right boots for you. Even if you find a solution, it will undoubtedly involve adding large amounts of padding, and it is unlikely that it will result in boots that perform well. Your boots are the connection between your body and your skis, and you don't want any more slop than absolutley necessay.
My thoughts exactly!
post #11 of 29
There's room and then there is room. It all depends on where the room is as to whether it can be reduced effectively. My foot is wide, and carries the width back to mid foot, but I have a very low instep and low arch. When I fit my instep, the boot is too narrow, fit the width and there is too much room over the instep. A custom molded pad over my instep keeps my foot snugly in touch with the bottom of the boot, functionaly connected, and allows very good snow and edge feel with out interfereing with needed foot mechanics and ankle movements.

Don't be so quick to discount things that are outside the mainstream. This is evolved from DavidM's birdcage device research in Canada, which he turned me onto and turtored me through. Later, RicB.
post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
I totally agree with getting the right shell fit to begin with. The thing is my Lange AC8 fits very well everywhere except the instep. I have less than 1cm behind my heel with my toes touching the front and maybe just 2mm on each side. In fact, it's a super tight fit all around the sides of my feet and ankles, just loose on top of foot and front of ankle. I somehow doubt I will find a better shell fit unless I go with a plug boot and I'm not looking at that option.
post #13 of 29
The AC is the old shell last and has a pretty pointy toe box. If you have somewhat square toes you may be hitting the sides of the toe box before you hit the front. It may give the false impression it is a good fit. If you try a boot with a squarer toe box (new langes or atomic) you may find you can fit a smaller shell size with less instep volume.

Other options include a foot bed may better align your foot and also raise your instep so there will be less volume to take up. A foam tongue as oppose to the whole liner may also help. I think Zipfit was doing the tongues on their own still. In the past I have padded the tongue heavily to take up room in the same area. I have used the blue sleeping mat foam or EVA pads are often denser as long as you have a grinder to shape and contour them and you are patient.
post #14 of 29
RicB,

Are you suggesting that it is better to add material to hold the foot down than to punch/grind the width? Or just that the foot/ankle must be allowed to move properly? I would think that an artificial restriction of the foot results in measureably poorer skiing. Can you summarize DavidM's thoughts?
post #15 of 29
I had this same. 1.5" is a bit excessive If you use a soft shell boot all you need to do is push down your boot tongue(the piece on top of ur instep) hold it down and buckle up. if not......

get some insoles for the boots wear two socks and put some padding like foam(shoulder pads from blazers) between the socks.......(may sound stupid but it works.)
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctown
I had this same. 1.5" is a bit excessive If you use a soft shell boot all you need to do is push down your boot tongue(the piece on top of ur instep) hold it down and buckle up. if not......

get some insoles for the boots wear two socks and put some padding like foam(shoulder pads from blazers) between the socks.......(may sound stupid but it works.)
You arn't serious are you? If you are, that is the worst advice I think I have heard on the forum ever!

You never, ever want to wear more than one sock.

You need to get a new boot that fits your heel, ankle and instep properly. Width in the forefoot is not a problem. Any good boot fitter can give you more width in your forefoot. the rest of these haphazard ideas to tighten your boot are piecemeal at best and almost never work properly.

Just cocme to grips with the fact you bought the wrong boot and cough up the $300 to $600.00 it is going to cost you to fix it

Now you have more experience and know more what you need but with that said, find a good professional bootfitter that can steer you towards a boot that fits your footshape and stance requirements to start and let them make the boot fit you perfectly.

All the rest of this stuff is just jimmyrigged!
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davey911
I totally agree with getting the right shell fit to begin with. The thing is my Lange AC8 fits very well everywhere except the instep. I have less than 1cm behind my heel with my toes touching the front and maybe just 2mm on each side. In fact, it's a super tight fit all around the sides of my feet and ankles, just loose on top of foot and front of ankle. I somehow doubt I will find a better shell fit unless I go with a plug boot and I'm not looking at that option.
Davey,

If you are sticking with these boots, then here is my advice, always push the leg and foot back into the heel cup and push the foot down. I almost never lift the foot using Bontex shims. To do this follow along...

If you add any material other than a 3mm neoprene tongue shim it's going to pack out. I like to use the 3mm tongue shim because it pushes the leg & foot back into the heel cup of the boot and it helps to push the foot down (I buy my neoprene shims from the Lange Race Dept. and so can your local shop.

Good luck!
Coup

BTW: Almost every Lange racer on the US Team is usingthese shims.
post #18 of 29

Davey send me an email so I can help you with Lange boots.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davey911
I have a pair of Lange AC8's that fit great length and width-wise but have a massive amount of space on top of my foot and in front of the ankle. When I step into the empty shell barefoot, there is over 1.5 inches between the top of my foot and the shell, buckled in the first position. There is maybe 1/8 inch of space above my toes but then it increases to over 1.5 inches when it reaches my ankle. The result is that my foot can easily slide forward when I'm fully buckled.

Does anyone have a good solution for this problem? I thought about bontex shims under the liner but it would be impractical to fill that much space. The only way I can think of is to put some dense padding over that part of the tongue to increase the thickness by about 1/2 inch. I would need something that is very dense and incompressible yet flexible. Maybe 1/8 inch vinyl from a mat? Any ideas?

Thanks!
Davey,

Send me an e-mail and I can help you out!

repsamples@verizon.net

coup
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE
RicB,

Are you suggesting that it is better to add material to hold the foot down than to punch/grind the width? Or just that the foot/ankle must be allowed to move properly? I would think that an artificial restriction of the foot results in measureably poorer skiing. Can you summarize DavidM's thoughts?
I hope David doesn't mind, but I think it would be fair to say that holding the foot imobile to keep the heel in place and the foot down on the bottom of the boot results in artificial restriction and poorer skiing. Keeping the foot pressed down on the footbed allows the forefoot to have room for good mechanics and still keep heel in place. I've experimented in 2 different boots and am skiing better than ever as a result of his ideas and the execution of his ideas. He may not agree with everthing I have done but I think it is in line wiht his research.

I think it is always better to gently hold the foot down from above the instep, whether the boot needs grinding or not. If a person can get there without an instep pad and/or grinding, I say great. I think most find themselves overclamping their boots and restrictign the small needed movements of the foot and ankle before they get their foot held gently connected to the footbed.

It is not rocket science, it doesn't do permanent damage to the boot unless you want to permantly install it in the tongue, and it doesn't cost much. Personaly I won't ski without it. Comfort and connection. Later, RicB.
post #20 of 29
Thanks ric!
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
RicB,

Are you saying that it's ok to have space at the sides of the forefoot so that the foot can move side to side, as long as it's being pressed down on the instep into the footbed? In my case, I don't have any space at the sides.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davey911
RicB,

Are you saying that it's ok to have space at the sides of the forefoot so that the foot can move side to side, as long as it's being pressed down on the instep into the footbed? In my case, I don't have any space at the sides.
I don't want my foot moving from side to side, but I do want it to have enough room to pronate about 2 degrees give or take, along with some medial ankle room. This is what I have been told, and this is what I strive for in my boots. Kinda like keeping the pump primed and ready to go. Later, RicB.
post #23 of 29
RicB:

As you have said & itis my understanding the adjustment you are talking about is in the area of the navicular and maybe below the ankle very slightly. I have had this done to my boots also.

Schlopy (hate to say it but he apparantly worked with Harb on this)

"Harald Harb
#4 - Skiing Inside The BootAt Harb Ski Systems we are always striving to put our customers and ourselves in the best products available in the ski industry. My staff and coaches are all professional skiers and have been for many decades. These people are not just instructors and coaches, but also boot fitters, footbed specialists and alignment experts. We feel that to teach skiing properly at the highest level you must understand the whole system: feet, ankles, boots and alignment. With this level of understanding, ski instruction becomes very precise and effective. My staff and I are always looking to enhance our own experience on snow. Therefore I encourage them to try many products and to modify their own. Recently, we have been working on ski boot modifications. Last summer, I modified many ski boots at Mt. Hood for FIS Junior US development racers with great success. We began this season modifying ski boots for many other racers including World Cup and US Ski Team racer, Erik Schlopy. This has become an ongoing relationship. We send modified boots to Europe for Erik and he sends his new boots to us from Europe to modify. Erik, remember, has access to the best boot technicians the World Cup can provide, but prefers to send his boots to us. We are working on two different modifications on Erik's boots. They increase the ability of the foot and ankle to produce edging power and the ability of the ankle to access the boot wall through medial wall and boot board modifications. These are the same movements of the ankle we try to provide for all our footbed and alignment customers. The functional articulation of the ankle and foot in the boot provides and enhances the skier's ability to make refined, fine-tuning movements to adjust the ski edge angle on the snow. If this articulation is not available, movements are made at the hip using the adductor muscles to lever the ski on edge. This is a very gross motor movement and does not allow for much adjustment once the movement to the edge begins. In high-end expert skiing or World Cup racing the combination of ankle, foot and leg edging adjustments is essential. So, why do so few recreational skiers have access to these movements? Because most industry footbeds are overposted and too rigid. This concept has been in my mind and I have applied it for generations as a ski racer, skier, coach and instructor. I have always felt that foot and ankle articulation in the boot are critical to skier performance, especially in the areas of ski edging, holding and controlling. But everywhere I investigated, even to this day, I find that the ski industry is trying to accomplish exactly the opposite. With hard footbeds and ski boot walls that are very tight on the medial (inside) ankle, most products reduce lateral movement of the ankle toward the boot wall - reducing or eliminating foot articulation. In some ways of thinking this can be justified and explained to seem like a benefit. For example, if rigid footbeds with dense material filling the arch stop any foot movement, one could think that you would get immediate edge and energy transfer. Yes, this does seem to make sense - until you begin to understand that you are now forced to use your upper leg muscles to achieve this immediate edging and transfer. The upper leg muscles (adductors) do not have the ability to fine-tune the edge, thus eliminating any presumed "benefit" of the rigid footbed/immediate-edge-power concept. Skiers whom we have converted from rigid footbeds to those that allow articulation become more balanced, smooth, and fluid. They also benefit from better foot circulation and therefore have warmer toes. Many overposted and rigid-footed skiers fight their edges. The lack of foot articulation creates chatter on hard snow and over-steering on soft snow. The skis are also super-reactive and feel nervous. Many skiers complain of arch pressure or even pain, but are afraid to mention it because they supposedly bought a "special upgrade". All these problems can be immediately relieved with a more compliant and accurately designed footbed. Now we must keep in mind that every body has different abilities and needs. Some skiers have excess foot movement that needs to be controlled, though not eliminated. A rigid foot and ankle demonstrate the opposite needs. The rigid foot and ankle are particularly interesting because increasing range of lateral movement in the ankle and foot is much more difficult than reducing range of motion. Hence every footbed needs to be carefully designed and built for the needs of the individual foot to optimize lateral edging power, allowing the range of articulation of the foot and ankle required to apply force to the boot wall. Applying force to the boot wall can only be achieved if the muscles that tip - evert - the foot can function. The peroneal muscles that run up along the outside of the tibia must be able to move the foot through some range of motion for this to occur. In our painstaking effort to evaluate a skier's balance on snow, we came across some interesting findings. We video all of the skiers who come to our camps while they perform on-snow balancing exercises. After careful analysis of the skiers before and after alignment, over a period of six years, we have determined that skiers with rigid feet and skiers with flexible feet both suffered similar consequences from rigid, inflexible footbeds. These skiers were not able to use their lower joints in the ski boot to help balance or edge the ski. They instead leaned or otherwise used the upper body in a contrived manner to lever the ski to an edge. Most of these skiers cannot engage the edge of the ski – make it slice into the snow. Instead, they demonstrate slipping of the ski. After a complete set of range-of-motion measurements are taken and a footbed made to allow for proper articulation of the ankle and foot, the skiers again perform the on-snow balance exercises. This second set of exercises yields very different results. Again, slow motion video analysis is used to determine differences in balancing and skiing abilities. One noticeable difference is a new, relaxed body position. The lower body acts as an adjuster of balance and the upper body a stable unit over the boots and feet. Some observers go so far as to say that, the skiers skied as if they had another joint to use in the boot to edge and balance over the ski. Another noticeable difference is an improvement in the skier's ability to engage the edge of the ski, eliminating the slipping that was previously evident. In this season alone we have assembled quantifiable evidence that the footbed and movements I am describing in this article are not only effective but also necessary for higher performance and comfort. We have documented major performance increases with ski racers the very next day after footbed changes. In one particular case, the ski racer improved by thirty FIS points on three different occasions. This occurred without further coaching or equipment changes. We can document such changes in recreational skiers by video and observing their improved edging and ski performance characteristics, but many objectors and detractors would claim that this is unscientific. When we have quantifiable results based on huge improvements in racing times, there is very little left to doubt. When the top ski racers in this country are noticing the performance benefits, and when our recreational skiers are noticeably skiing better and improving faster, that's all the proof they need."

and Bode have both mentioned the ability to make fine balance adjustments by giving a little room against the medial boot wall below the ankle and in the navicular area and on the boot board somehow. they have said this is key to to their amazing balance and the ability to use their feet instead of more gross movements in the hip & leg to make these balance adjustments or edge pressure adjustments.

Yes, no?
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
RicB:

As you have said & itis my understanding the adjustment you are talking about is in the area of the navicular and maybe below the ankle very slightly. I have had this done to my boots also.

Schlopy (hate to say it but he apparantly worked with Harb on this)

"Harald Harb
#4 - Skiing Inside The BootAt Harb Ski Systems we are always striving to put our customers and ourselves in the best products available in the ski industry. My staff and coaches are all professional skiers and have been for many decades. These people are not just instructors and coaches, but also boot fitters, footbed specialists and alignment experts. We feel that to teach skiing properly at the highest level you must understand the whole system: feet, ankles, boots and alignment. With this level of understanding, ski instruction becomes very precise and effective. My staff and I are always looking to enhance our own experience on snow. Therefore I encourage them to try many products and to modify their own. Recently, we have been working on ski boot modifications. Last summer, I modified many ski boots at Mt. Hood for FIS Junior US development racers with great success. We began this season modifying ski boots for many other racers including World Cup and US Ski Team racer, Erik Schlopy. This has become an ongoing relationship. We send modified boots to Europe for Erik and he sends his new boots to us from Europe to modify. Erik, remember, has access to the best boot technicians the World Cup can provide, but prefers to send his boots to us. We are working on two different modifications on Erik's boots. They increase the ability of the foot and ankle to produce edging power and the ability of the ankle to access the boot wall through medial wall and boot board modifications. These are the same movements of the ankle we try to provide for all our footbed and alignment customers. The functional articulation of the ankle and foot in the boot provides and enhances the skier's ability to make refined, fine-tuning movements to adjust the ski edge angle on the snow. If this articulation is not available, movements are made at the hip using the adductor muscles to lever the ski on edge. This is a very gross motor movement and does not allow for much adjustment once the movement to the edge begins. In high-end expert skiing or World Cup racing the combination of ankle, foot and leg edging adjustments is essential. So, why do so few recreational skiers have access to these movements? Because most industry footbeds are overposted and too rigid. This concept has been in my mind and I have applied it for generations as a ski racer, skier, coach and instructor. I have always felt that foot and ankle articulation in the boot are critical to skier performance, especially in the areas of ski edging, holding and controlling. But everywhere I investigated, even to this day, I find that the ski industry is trying to accomplish exactly the opposite. With hard footbeds and ski boot walls that are very tight on the medial (inside) ankle, most products reduce lateral movement of the ankle toward the boot wall - reducing or eliminating foot articulation. In some ways of thinking this can be justified and explained to seem like a benefit. For example, if rigid footbeds with dense material filling the arch stop any foot movement, one could think that you would get immediate edge and energy transfer. Yes, this does seem to make sense - until you begin to understand that you are now forced to use your upper leg muscles to achieve this immediate edging and transfer. The upper leg muscles (adductors) do not have the ability to fine-tune the edge, thus eliminating any presumed "benefit" of the rigid footbed/immediate-edge-power concept. Skiers whom we have converted from rigid footbeds to those that allow articulation become more balanced, smooth, and fluid. They also benefit from better foot circulation and therefore have warmer toes. Many overposted and rigid-footed skiers fight their edges. The lack of foot articulation creates chatter on hard snow and over-steering on soft snow. The skis are also super-reactive and feel nervous. Many skiers complain of arch pressure or even pain, but are afraid to mention it because they supposedly bought a "special upgrade". All these problems can be immediately relieved with a more compliant and accurately designed footbed. Now we must keep in mind that every body has different abilities and needs. Some skiers have excess foot movement that needs to be controlled, though not eliminated. A rigid foot and ankle demonstrate the opposite needs. The rigid foot and ankle are particularly interesting because increasing range of lateral movement in the ankle and foot is much more difficult than reducing range of motion. Hence every footbed needs to be carefully designed and built for the needs of the individual foot to optimize lateral edging power, allowing the range of articulation of the foot and ankle required to apply force to the boot wall. Applying force to the boot wall can only be achieved if the muscles that tip - evert - the foot can function. The peroneal muscles that run up along the outside of the tibia must be able to move the foot through some range of motion for this to occur. In our painstaking effort to evaluate a skier's balance on snow, we came across some interesting findings. We video all of the skiers who come to our camps while they perform on-snow balancing exercises. After careful analysis of the skiers before and after alignment, over a period of six years, we have determined that skiers with rigid feet and skiers with flexible feet both suffered similar consequences from rigid, inflexible footbeds. These skiers were not able to use their lower joints in the ski boot to help balance or edge the ski. They instead leaned or otherwise used the upper body in a contrived manner to lever the ski to an edge. Most of these skiers cannot engage the edge of the ski – make it slice into the snow. Instead, they demonstrate slipping of the ski. After a complete set of range-of-motion measurements are taken and a footbed made to allow for proper articulation of the ankle and foot, the skiers again perform the on-snow balance exercises. This second set of exercises yields very different results. Again, slow motion video analysis is used to determine differences in balancing and skiing abilities. One noticeable difference is a new, relaxed body position. The lower body acts as an adjuster of balance and the upper body a stable unit over the boots and feet. Some observers go so far as to say that, the skiers skied as if they had another joint to use in the boot to edge and balance over the ski. Another noticeable difference is an improvement in the skier's ability to engage the edge of the ski, eliminating the slipping that was previously evident. In this season alone we have assembled quantifiable evidence that the footbed and movements I am describing in this article are not only effective but also necessary for higher performance and comfort. We have documented major performance increases with ski racers the very next day after footbed changes. In one particular case, the ski racer improved by thirty FIS points on three different occasions. This occurred without further coaching or equipment changes. We can document such changes in recreational skiers by video and observing their improved edging and ski performance characteristics, but many objectors and detractors would claim that this is unscientific. When we have quantifiable results based on huge improvements in racing times, there is very little left to doubt. When the top ski racers in this country are noticing the performance benefits, and when our recreational skiers are noticeably skiing better and improving faster, that's all the proof they need."

and Bode have both mentioned the ability to make fine balance adjustments by giving a little room against the medial boot wall below the ankle and in the navicular area and on the boot board somehow. they have said this is key to to their amazing balance and the ability to use their feet instead of more gross movements in the hip & leg to make these balance adjustments or edge pressure adjustments.

Yes, no?
Brilliant post! We ski with our ankles, we skate with our ankles so on and so forth! I just wish I could have put into words like HH!

coup

If the ankle,knee or hip are locked up you break the kinetic chain and this is not only slow but unbalanced.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
You arn't serious are you? If you are, that is the worst advice I think I have heard on the forum ever!

You never, ever want to wear more than one sock.

You need to get a new boot that fits your heel, ankle and instep properly. Width in the forefoot is not a problem. Any good boot fitter can give you more width in your forefoot. the rest of these haphazard ideas to tighten your boot are piecemeal at best and almost never work properly.

Just cocme to grips with the fact you bought the wrong boot and cough up the $300 to $600.00 it is going to cost you to fix it

Now you have more experience and know more what you need but with that said, find a good professional bootfitter that can steer you towards a boot that fits your footshape and stance requirements to start and let them make the boot fit you perfectly.

All the rest of this stuff is just jimmyrigged!
it might sound stupid but it's based on my own experience and I used these method all along starting from the 1st day when I fall down the hill 20+times a day to now doing 360 jumps. My whole entire gear(skis+boots) didn't cost me more than $300 at anytime. If you have the $ or feel like spending more $ the best way of couse would be what you suggest but I'm just sharing my stuff that works for me and maybe someone else.............(BUT I NEVER say it's the right way) BUT BUT u're right if it doesn't fit you should try to see a prof or get a new pair even if it cost you more $
post #26 of 29
Aman, I pretty much agree. I no longer use a full hard footbed. I use an aftermarket footbed which is designed for active foot use, so it supports the arch farther back and allows just enough articulation for good ski foot and ankle mechanics. Combine this with foam over the instep keeping the foot in good contact ready to engage and you will feel the results. Later, RicB.
post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 
ok, if someone could explain this in english, i would appreciate it!

where exactly should there be space in the boots in layman's terms???
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by davey911
ok, if someone could explain this in english, i would appreciate it!

where exactly should there be space in the boots in layman's terms???
Okay, I like my forefoot to be contained but not pressured in from the sides. In particular the ball of the big toe should not be pressured from the side. Like this also, the ankle should be contained but the inside of the ankle (medial side) should not be pressured from the boot either. This allows the foot to be "tipped" inside the boot a couple of degrees or so. The top of the boot cuff should be snug around the calf and shin, and the lower buckle on the cuff should be looser than the upper buckle so that the ankle can flex forward without too much resistance from the boot at the joint. Does this help? Later, RicB.
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks Ric. I think I understand what you are saying.

I have cork Superfeet footbeds, which I guess would be considered rigid footbeds and not good for this technique?

How would you go about creating space between the boot and inside ankle(medial), assuming you have a pretty tight fit there?
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