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Lesson in the soreness ...

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Ok so you go out skiing and later than night/the next day you're sore. Ever more sore on one side than the other? Have isolated soreness? Perhaps sore in an odd (or what you think is odd) place?

This year I have noticed this more and more. It occurred to me -- your sore and stiff muscles can tell you a lot about your skiing.

What are your pains telling you?
post #2 of 17
I had this experience week before last. I skied Vail, mostly back bowls, in a foot of day-old snow and half a foot of new. I was on 161 Supersports, and hadn't skied this much snow while using them. Light and fresh is okay, but it took me a while to find the sweet spot in the heavier stuff, and frankly I struggled most of the day with fore and aft balance. ALthough I tried not to, I kept wishing I had brought my old 178 Vertigos. I really wanted some more length.

Anyway, it was still grand fun, but I was SO sore the next day (or two) in a brand-new place: very high on the inside to back of my thigh, sort of adductor/hamstring area, a little into the butt. (No wisecracks! Oops, another double entendre.) Sorry, I don't know the exact names of the muscles. If the top of my left thigh is 12 o'clock, it was about 2 or 3 o'clock around to 6 or 7 o'clock. And the same part of inner to back thigh on the other side.

I don't think it was from a fall, because it was symmetrical. Was I skiing with legs too far apart for that kind of snow, and fighting to keep my skis from going opposite directions? It's late in the ski season, and I was surprised to be sore.
post #3 of 17
My muscles tell me either I'm not 18 anymore, or that making slalom turns at 35 mph is a lot more work than making DH turns at 75 mph, or both.
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Segbrown - I frequently feel my muscles right at the point where the thigh and butt join. I also get soreness on the outside of my thighs - laterally from hip to knee. I generally never get the traditional thigh burn anymore.

Hey all of you MA experts - let's talk about what the soreness tells us about how we were skiing!
post #5 of 17
Quote:
I also get soreness on the outside of my thighs - laterally from hip to knee.
Interesting. Sounds like the IT band. Runners get that frequently. One of the functions of the IT band, is to keep us from walking like Marilyn Monroe, i.e., no lateral movement of the hips. This is why IT band syndrome occurs frequently in distance runners. If a runner ran with their hips swaying from side to side, they'd look like a dork! Needless to say, the more distance a runner does, the more the IT band activates.

Not sure what it would mean for skiers. My guess is that it has something to do with lateral weight transference.
post #6 of 17

Conditioning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
My muscles tell me either I'm not 18 anymore, or that making slalom turns at 35 mph is a lot more work than making DH turns at 75 mph, or both.
Downhill skiing requires a lot of muscle. If you aren't doing it regulary (especially as you age), you will feel it. This year there was a lot of snow local to me and my travel vehicle was in the shop for 7 weeks so I was cross country skiing more than three times a week. Since I had started the season correctly by easing into my Downhill skiing, I hadn't experienced serious soreness for a while. The X-C kept me feeling I was in shape. Well, I finally got a chance to ski DH on Easter. It was a glorious day of sun and good temps. I got carried away and skied hard all day. Three days later I was wondering if it was worth it.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost
My muscles tell me either I'm not 18 anymore, or that making slalom turns at 35 mph is a lot more work than making DH turns at 75 mph, or both.
SL turns at 35 mph? DH turns at 75 mph? What are you talking about man? Even World Cup skiers rarely reach these kinds of speed.
post #8 of 17

Owwch

Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
What are your pains telling you?
That I'd rather have snow than 336 gallons of rain in my basement.

So.

Whad'yall do at 4am?
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
SL turns at 35 mph? DH turns at 75 mph? What are you talking about man? Even World Cup skiers rarely reach these kinds of speed.
That's 'cause they have to make all the gates. I just have to stay alive.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
That I'd rather have snow than 336 gallons of rain in my basement.

So.

Whad'yall do at 4am?
You'll be skiing, soon! Just keep your focus, friend!
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown
Anyway, it was still grand fun, but I was SO sore the next day (or two) in a brand-new place: very high on the inside to back of my thigh, sort of adductor/hamstring area, a little into the butt. (No wisecracks! Oops, another double entendre.) Sorry, I don't know the exact names of the muscles. If the top of my left thigh is 12 o'clock, it was about 2 or 3 o'clock around to 6 or 7 o'clock. And the same part of inner to back thigh on the other side.

I don't think it was from a fall, because it was symmetrical. Was I skiing with legs too far apart for that kind of snow, and fighting to keep my skis from going opposite directions? It's late in the ski season, and I was surprised to be sore.
If this is the day that you and I skied with Fox, et. al., I suspect that it's a combination of carrying your weight a bit back (standing on your heels) and working to keep your skis from running away as you worked them with a little too much rotary (instead of allowing them to turn as they pushed against the snow, actually turning them with muscle power even when they were under the surface of the snow).

LM would know better than I, but could this come from working with femur rotation all day?
post #12 of 17
Good possibility, ssh.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
If this is the day that you and I skied with Fox, et. al., I suspect that it's a combination of carrying your weight a bit back (standing on your heels) and working to keep your skis from running away as you worked them with a little too much rotary (instead of allowing them to turn as they pushed against the snow, actually turning them with muscle power even when they were under the surface of the snow).

LM would know better than I, but could this come from working with femur rotation all day?
Yes, it was then. I always thought skiing with your weight back was hard on your quads, not the back of your legs. But I have had a little trouble with the back seat this year; I've been trying to adjust from my diagnosis at the Front Range TuneUp this year that I skied too far forward! OH well.

That's probably it, since I definitely felt like I was going forward AND back much of the day.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
comprex - you lucky bastard! you never said you had an indoor swimming pool!

anyway, back to the subject. LM -- thanks for the tip on the IT band. Perhaps I need to strengthen mine? I bet band-walking would be GREAT for that (side stepping with lots of resistance). Otherwise get used to "HEY LADY! Can I get some fries with that SHAKE?"

hahaha
post #15 of 17
I would suggest band walking along with foam roller release after skiing.
post #16 of 17
I rarely get sore after skiing. Before this last year, I could go all day, days in a row, and not be sore. I suppose I'm not on the most challenging stuff, but I'm still making lots of progress in my skiing. (I have pain, but it's from things unrelated to skiing.)

Am I doing it wrong?
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Bonni,

No pain can't be wrong, right? LOL

Seriously, though. This season I complained: "The thing I loved about learning to ski better was that it became more and more effortless."

I also got to a point where I could ski all day with no muscle fatgue/soreness. I wanted to up the ante again with my skiing, so I decided that I needed to "ski more athletically". I went to the gym and plugged away. This season I skied better in general, but especially in terrain like bumps and crud.

And -- along came a host of new aches/pains. Hence my complaint. I thought this was all supposed to keep getting easier/better/more efficient??!!??

I was wrong. The simple explanation is: the more you use a muscle, the more it produces lactic acid, which causes soreness. And, the best exercise to prepare you for skiing is skiing. So, people who ski daily won't feel as much muscle fatigue as us weekend warriors.

Hope my rambling makes some sense.
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