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Fischer RC4 WC SC

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Hi there are several closeout bargains to be had and the Fischer RC4 WC SC have caught my eye, 170cm. I am 6ft, 200lbs and int/adv level.

What are these like for an all day skiing experience? I will mainly be skiing on-piste, groomed with a couple of minor races to boot. Into fast and tight as well as long and carved turns soooo....????? What you think?

All help appreciated and thanks for the great site
post #2 of 27
too much ski if you are int/adv

if you removed ALL vestiges of intermediate skiing maybe they would work as a training tool, but still not good for all-day for anyone short of high advanced/expert

my opinion, take or leave.

I owned the '03-'04 WC SC in 160cms, I'm 5'10" 160 lbs Level 8. I skied it all day several times but its real value was as a training tool for modern crossunder technique refinement.
post #3 of 27
To long, the SC is not intended for length above 165cm. What do you want, a slalom? Well a slalom is nowadays never 170cm. Take 160to 165. The SC is a hard ski, it will be sufficient even for your weight.
post #4 of 27
You may want to try the WC RC instead of the SC. As mentioned in the other replies, the SC is really a slalom ski and requires constant input. The RC's are a GS ski with more sidecut that allowed by USSA or FIS. The RC still takes lots of input but will let you relax more than the SC.

Good luck.
post #5 of 27
perhaps the "race" SC, a step down from the world cup.

I have posted a review of the WC SC, you can search for it and it may help a bit.
post #6 of 27
A beauty and a beast.

If I find a pair during the off season in 165 for a decent price, they are mine. A word of caution: if you consider yourself to be intermediate -- even slightly -- these are not for you. They are wicked frontside knives and will reward your most gluttonous desire for response, grip and speed. They are also really quick, edge to ede. But don't even try to think of them as an all-day all mountain ski: they are not. As you get tired, you will stop skiing them and they will start skiing you ... with results that you may not want to dwell on. Bring two pair to the mountain, use these for training, and gates? Yes, please.

Do a search on them -- there's plenty to read.
post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
thanks for all your help now re-thinking my plans.....
post #8 of 27
170cm is too long. You could ski them in 160cm. At 165# I have them in 160, could go to 155cm comfortably. They are a ski designed to reward good modern technique, rounded turns with inside ski activity, no outside ski tail push, no backseat driving. A fun ski, but you have to be on 'em.

Jim
post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
Looks like the Race SC option or Atomic GS9, different I know but at least I have tried them. Now for which length :
post #10 of 27
I am 6', 95kg, (whatever that is in pounds, probably to heavy) but I have skied the Race SC in 170 for the last two seasons in Australia and absolutely love them. Great at speed, quick edge to edge and I ski these hard all day and just let the ski do all the work. Best ski Ive ever used, especially for the hard pack that we tend to have in Oz. Highly recommended.
post #11 of 27
@JimL, why not in the backseat?
Speaking about the 03/04 model (160cm), I loved the speed they gather when your in the backseat (controlled backseat, not accidentally). They will then throw you around the gate.

IMO with a good technique this ski can easily be skied the whole day, if the snow is hard, in slushy conditions it might not be fun. (I do not ski if there is no hardpack). They are no downhill ski, so if you go down 1000m without stopping, putting in slalom radius, on a steep slope, well then after 3 runs your basically burned out for the day. But if you stop for half a minute every 400m in height, no probs.
post #12 of 27

Fischer RC4 WC SC

Hello, everyone
I just got back from a 3 days skiing at Mammoth and just loved my newly acquired Fischer RC4 WorldCup SC 160 cm w/ Fischer FR11 Freeflex bindings. I'm a light and advanced skier 5'8 150 lbs, not an expert but ski w/ "total control" at Drop out chutes, wire out chutes, scotty's etc... Last year I demoed for 2 days on the Volkl supersport 6 star and once again these skis can also do it all but the difference is the Volkl is definitely heavier than the Fischer WC SC.
Apart from extreme powder (again I'm no expert on it but I did enjoy trying out the Dynastar Legend 8000) I believe my Fischer WC SC can handle everything at Mammoth especially I only ski the front side of the mountain.
The point is, and I can only speak for myself, the Fischer WC SC can do it all whether with extreme speed, bumps, and even "TO CRUISE". As a matter of fact, I love "to cruise" with my Fischer WC SC at the start of the day by skiing at least the first 5 runs on green/blue runs at near zero speed. I need to find my ski sweetspot first while speed can always wait. As with every pair of skis (no matter how stiff or soft) it's the "manner" of how we use them!
post #13 of 27
I ski on my World Cup SCs (160s) and my Atomic SL11s (155s) all day long, but I tend to vary the turn radius beyond the typical slalom size to keep fatigue to a minimum. They are a bit of a chore to ski all day off of the groomers, but I use them for a few runs there for "personal growth". They do let you know when it's time to stop for the day, and being in decent ski shape doesn't hurt either.
post #14 of 27
I should add in the interest of fairness that it is possible to dog these skis and not get worked by them. you just stay slow, slow, slow. you turn uphill most of the time. and you keep your turn radii large. but surely, this is NOT what the ski is designed for. and if you ski it this way, you are wasting the incredible design features, pissing them away like yellow snow.

what is the point of getting a velcro-gripping hard snow racer carver if you plan to ski like an intermediate? that's the question I'd ask myself if I were considering the WC SC and knew I wasn't really interested in serious short turn carve refining, or racing.
post #15 of 27

Fischer RC4 WC SC

The first 5 runs of the day on green/blue runs with minimum speed is meant to "feel" the center of the skis and it will only take about +/- 35 minutes and to practice my "breathing" at every turn. I still have the next 7.5 hours to "rip down" the mountain ... as I've said, the Fischer WC SC can do it all "at extreme speed, bumps/moguls, and cruising!
I believe FIS worldcup racers do the same before every race ... I learned these techniques from my days at youth racing ski camps and I believe I'm "still" and advanced but not "expert" skier. Sorry, expert skiers for me mean something like current and ex-worldcup racers ...
I would agree w/ Alaska Mike that varying the turn radius and "speed" beyond the typical slalom size turns to keep fatigue to a minimum. Yes, I can really "RIP" down the mountain and keep up with "anyone" out there but usually for a non-stop 3-4 double black diamond runs, then resort back to Alaska Mike's style for the next few "relaxed/intermediate" style of skiing before going at it again!
Finally, I doubt if any "intermediate" skier would ever hear of the Fischer WC SC leave alone spending good money for them!
post #16 of 27
skifinesse did you even read the first, origin post? the asker is an intermediate.
post #17 of 27
Hello, Gonzostrike
Yes, I did (int/adv level) but I dont' know ... nowadays people real assessment of themselves are all different. I raced when I was a kid and I still consider myself "only" advance but definitely not expert!
If he's truly an intermediate then I hope he wouldn't go for it but again he did mention about "a coupe of minor races to boot" so I don't know anymore. At the end of the day, it's his money so I wish him the best of luck!
Sometimes a bargain isn't exactly a "bargain" unless one can take "FULL" advantage of what the skis have to offer Who wouldn't love items on sales?
The analogy is, if you just barely learn how to drive or with minimum or "intermediate" driving skills ... would you go out and buy an 18 wheeler because it's on sale?
Again, I can only speak for myself!
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by hep4186
You may want to try the WC RC instead of the SC. As mentioned in the other replies, the SC is really a slalom ski and requires constant input. The RC's are a GS ski with more sidecut that allowed by USSA or FIS. The RC still takes lots of input but will let you relax more than the SC.

Good luck.
You have it backwards the RC is a GS ski and Gs ski's have less sidecut thus a larger turn radius less sidecut. And GS skis are usually more dificult due to less sidecut, longer length and more speed required to make them work.

This guy is completly barking up the wrong tree with Fischer Race skis andyway as an Int/ADV.

Maybe an RX-8 (Slalom sidecut, all mountain ski)if he wants a Fischer that he could still aspire to as he improves in a mid 170's length.
post #19 of 27
Hey, I do not know why you are all moaning bout the power and technique you need on a real slalom ski. Put my father on my race room skis and his skiing went up 2 levels from his old Atomic 9.18. He never knew how to hold a carve. Wow on my skis he was forced to carve and he loved it. He did not look great on those skis as his technique is still quite classic. However he did not slide a single turn and he was really fascinated by the ski. You just need to carve and it will be sweet. And as you approach really steep and narrow slopes, well then on a hard ski it might be ennoying if you are not good enough. Race skis are the best for hard and icy slopes. I would only stay away from the ski if I knew that I mostly ski on days above 0 Celsius.
The Fischer is a great ski offering really good icehold.

guys, get on a real GS raceboard, then you know what you need your power for. For freecarving it needs as much power as a 205 SG ski needs for freecarving.
post #20 of 27
BTW. My father will buy himself as well a Snowrider next year with a VIST Worldcup Alu race plate on top of it and 2*Titanal. But it will probabley be the classic one with 80mm waist, so that I can use it as my ski for soft snow.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremecarver
Hey, I do not know why you are all moaning bout the power and technique you need on a real slalom ski. Put my father on my race room skis and his skiing went up 2 levels from his old Atomic 9.18. He never knew how to hold a carve. Wow on my skis he was forced to carve and he loved it. He did not look great on those skis as his technique is still quite classic. However he did not slide a single turn and he was really fascinated by the ski. You just need to carve and it will be sweet. And as you approach really steep and narrow slopes, well then on a hard ski it might be ennoying if you are not good enough. Race skis are the best for hard and icy slopes. I would only stay away from the ski if I knew that I mostly ski on days above 0 Celsius.
The Fischer is a great ski offering really good icehold.

guys, get on a real GS raceboard, then you know what you need your power for. For freecarving it needs as much power as a 205 SG ski needs for freecarving.
I ski on slalom racestock skis most of the time. So I agree. But maybe not for an Int.
post #22 of 27
Atomicman knows what he's talking about and so are everybody else from Extremecarver, Gonzostrike, AlaskaMike, etc... So, we're like a bunch of friends getting together and discuss about Fingers202's choice of skis.
Well, my LAST COMMENT on this subject is there's no "real" bad/dog slalom skis being made nowadays thanks to today's hi tech computer designs. Major ski brands such as Atomic (SL11)/yes, B. Miller got his big $$$ contract from Atomic but the skis didn't let him down, did they?, Fischer WC SC (or SL) , Volkl P60SC, etc... are all EXCELLENT EXCELLENT skis.
CONCLUSION? At the end of the day, Fingers202, you STILL HAVE TO SKI THEM AND NOT US so I can only say to DEMO them big time before making the purchase. BEST OF LUCK, DEAR FRIEND AND EVERYBODY ELSE ... HAVE A GREAT SUMMER '05 AND TO ENJOY MANY MORE SAFE + WONDERFUL SKI SEASONS AHEAD!
In the meantime, the 2004-2005 Fischer WC SC 160 cm remains my only quiver but I'm 100% happy with it. We COMPLEMENT one another!
Ciao
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
I ski on slalom racestock skis most of the time. So I agree. But maybe not for an Int.
Agreed, I used my race stock SL:11s in the back bowls at Vail w/o a problem, as well as everywhere on the front side. But yeah, if you can't drive the ski/angulate then a racestock ski can run away from you if you're an intermediate. There's no reason not to use a race ski as your all-day ski if you live in the East.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
Agreed, I used my race stock SL:11s in the back bowls at Vail w/o a problem, as well as everywhere on the front side. But yeah, if you can't drive the ski/angulate then a racestock ski can run away from you if you're an intermediate. There's reason not to use a race ski as your all-day ski if you live in the East.
:What's the reason not to use a race ski as your all-day ski if you live in the East?

Skifinesse,
If this post doesn't make it, it's because I'm drooling on the keyboard as I turn green with envy. I just bought a pair of RC4 Worldcup SCs and they are standing against the wall waiting for next fall's snow.

I do take some small comfort to hear all the good things about these skis.
Thankyou for your post.
post #25 of 27
[quote=Ghost]:What's the reason not to use a race ski as your all-day ski if you live in the East?

Skifinesse,
If this post doesn't make it, it's because I'm drooling on the keyboard as I turn green with envy. I just bought a pair of RC4 Worldcup SCs and they are standing against the wall waiting for next fall's snow.

I do take some small comfort to hear all the good things about these skis.
Thankyou for your post.[/QUOTEI thought the same thing?
post #26 of 27
I screwed up the post, meant to say that there is NO reason not to use a race ski as an all-day ski in the east. I edited it, but I just wanted to be clear lol.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223
I screwed up the post, meant to say that there is NO reason not to use a race ski as an all-day ski in the east. I edited it, but I just wanted to be clear lol.
Right on.
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