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Now that Bode's back in NH

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Has anybody actually seen him (or heard of him) getting on the slopes? I know he's Director of Skiing (or some such honorary title) at Bretton Woods, and he has a connection to both Cannon and Sugarloaf (via CVA).
post #2 of 22
I would imagine that Bode's at US Nationals right now at Mammoth? Usually most USST athletes attend if not actually race there. Bode grew up in Franconia and attended CVA. He has the honorary title of Director of Skiing at Bretton Woods, who is hosting 'Bodefest' April 29-May 1 - a golf and skiing event.
post #3 of 22
probably not since he is at Mammoth for the US Nationals
post #4 of 22
Bode will be at Bretton Woods on Saturday April 30th for the Bodefest. This is a race on the NASTAR course in the morning. Bode will be wearing bib number 1, of course. Then there are 9 holes of scramble golf with Bode in the afternoon. Bretton Woods Adaptive skiing will be the beneficiary of the event. Hope to see some Bears out there for a last ditch shot at skiing in the East.
post #5 of 22

Bode?

Where's CVA? What does it stand for? Is it a college or academy?
post #6 of 22

cva

Carrabassett Valley Academy, it's Sugarloaf's (Maine) Ski Academy.
post #7 of 22
How embarrassing for Bode. NASTAR is not ski racing.
post #8 of 22

Bode.

Did he go to College?
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by swiftskier
Did he go to College?
From what I understand, yeah.

http://www.blacklambs.com/Images/John%20Belushi.jpg
post #10 of 22
According to local rumor, Bode showed up at a junior race at Cannon weekend before last. Unannounced, just to spport the locals racing.

If its true, then that is seriously cool.
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw
How embarrassing for Bode. NASTAR is not ski racing.
It is racing enough for the people who show up and pay upwards of $150 to hang with him and support his fundraiser. Wish I had $150 to give to this guy who hasn't lost touch with the rest of us commoners and wannabees. **Sigh**
post #12 of 22
Wouldn't surprise me at all if he was at Cannon to support the FSC kids
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by swiftskier
Did he go to College?
No, he didn't. Most people on the USST did not, or at least not for more than a year or so. It is almost impossible to make it and attend four years of college, miss too much training time....those Austrians are fast, it takes a lot of practice to keep up
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sub Standard Skier_23
It is racing enough for the people who show up and pay upwards of $150 to hang with him and support his fundraiser. Wish I had $150 to give to this guy who hasn't lost touch with the rest of us commoners and wannabees. **Sigh**
he doesn't need your $150, he's doing alright with his sponsors, although almost every other racer could use your $150
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazeSSS
he doesn't need your $150, he's doing alright with his sponsors, although almost every other racer could use your $150

I assume "fundraiser" indicates the cash isn't going into his pocket.
post #16 of 22
The fundraiser is for the adaptive program at Bretton Woods.
post #17 of 22

Too Bad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blazeSSS
No, he didn't. Most people on the USST did not, or at least not for more than a year or so. It is almost impossible to make it and attend four years of college, miss too much training time....those Austrians are fast, it takes a lot of practice to keep up
That seems regretable, although I'm not so sure it is important.
post #18 of 22
I agree it is regretable, me and most of my friends were college ski racers, and there are some damn good ones...US Skiing would be wise to admit to and embrace that, but it never would have been for Bode, he isn't the college type...smart, but not a big school guy...my brother went to CVA right after he left, so I have a little inside knowledge
post #19 of 22
I don't think it's regretable at all. College is a natural breeding ground for top tier atheletes in sports that require a different type of organizational structure, team support, coaching input and economic support from fans. This is why football and basketball top the list on sports that use college to funnel athletes into the pro-ranks. In most other sports I can think of, whether or not an athlete attends college is and should be a decision that is wholly unrelated to their athletic pursuits. College is the gatekeeper to a professional career in basketball and football and the vast majority of professional players that attended college did so to pass through that gate. Now, the vast majority of college athletes playing those sports are leveraging their talents for an education since only a small fraction of them will play professinally. Where a sport does not require the organization and infrastructure of a college system to advance professionally, atheletes weigh their resources of time, finances and energy and their desire for that education and make decisions about whether or not college comes before or after athleteics ot not at all. I believe college should only be a gatekeeper to any profession, athletic or otherwise, where there are actually sensible reasons for it to be so. Just as I believe that in most cases, college football and basketball players that *don't* turn pro as early as possible are usually making a mistake. A career ending injury can happen at any time...better it should happen *after* the signing bonus clears. Professional athletes can always afford to finish their degrees if they really want to hang that "playground management" degree on the wall of their gated estate.

Bode Miller can still go to college any time he wants to. He's leveraging his resources appropriately as far as I can tell.
post #20 of 22
Interesting article in the New York Times this morning on Bode's whereabouts and plans:

Miller Ponders Forgoing Gold to Avoid Fame That Follows

By BILL PENNINGTON

If Bode Miller enters the 2006 Winter Olympics, he could win as many as five gold medals. Certainly, he would be a favorite to win two or three.


And to Miller, that is the problem.


Such a performance would bring him national celebrity, unheard of for a ski racer, and that prospect so troubles Miller that he has not yet agreed to participate in next year's Olympics. Already a superstar in Europe as the overall World Cup champion, Miller does not want fame to overtake his life at home as well.


"I've seen what has happened to my lifestyle in Europe, and it isn't pretty and it certainly isn't why I got into ski racing," Miller said yesterday. "I prize my privacy, and losing it is the one thing that makes me hesitate to commit to the Olympics right away. I don't want to put too much in jeopardy."


Miller, whose freethinking ways are well known in the ski community, has been floating the idea that he might not compete in the Olympics since last month, when he won the overall World Cup title, the first for an American since 1983. He is also talking about an alternative tour to the established World Cup. Miller, a New Hampshire native who was raised in a rural wood cabin without running water or electricity, said he would not make a decision about the Olympics for several weeks or months.


Few who know Miller doubt his sincerity, although it has been suggested that he may simply be trying to make a point.


"I want to be able to walk into a bar and order a beer without it being a big deal," said Miller, who appeared in Manhattan yesterday at a function organized by one of his chief sponsors, Barilla, the pasta company. "I want to be able to go ski recreationally and not be recognized. Right now, I can walk around in New York and nobody recognizes me. One guy did recognize me but he was an Austrian dude. I like it like that. I don't want to lose the ability to live the life I do."


At the same time, Miller recently signed an endorsement contract with Nike, which is hardly where an athlete goes to be under-promoted.


Miller, 27, won two silver medals at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics, accomplishments rooted in an individualistic, daring racing style. Celebrity may disconcert Miller, but he still is easily engaged in conversation about new training and equipment advances that he believes will make him a better skier. It is the conversation of someone eager to see what other races he can use to test himself, and even Miller concedes there is no bigger skiing event than the Olympics.


"It is the best way to see what you can do on a featured stage," Miller said. "Not for the glory but for the test."


For Miller, it is often about the test. He was chided, even by his own coaches, for competing this season in four different events - slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill - because most thought he would wear down and lose the commanding lead he had built for the overall title. But Miller ended the season with a flourish, running away with the crown.


"That was important for me because that's doing it the right way," Miller said. "It shouldn't be about getting the most World Cup points, anybody can do that specializing in one event. I wanted it to be clear to the rest of the racers and coaches and anyone else that I was the best World Cup racer. Because I finished the complete athletic test of every race."


Miller did not, however, guard his prize very well. The crystal globe he received for the overall title was broken after he gave it to baggage handlers on a flight returning from Europe.


"I still have the pieces," Miller said, laughing. "But they said they would replace it."
post #21 of 22
He was up in Blue River heli skiing with Mike Weigle and such this past week. A whole gang from Atomic was up including the Herminator and senior Atomic execs and designers. It's an annual schmooze fest.
post #22 of 22
Earth to Bode...Phil Mahre could walk around New York unmolested about six minutes after he retired. The fame doesn't last. You think Eric Heiden gets chased through shopping malls. Fine, you don't want the fame I can respect that. I was pretty sympathetic to your iconoclasm till you signed with Nike. You think Nike is paying you the big bucks because you ski well? They pay you the big bucks because skiing well gets you into the media wearing the swoosh.
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