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Smashing knees into boots

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Does anyone else whack there downhill knee cap into there uphill boot during your turns? Any theories as to why this is happening. Thanks.
post #2 of 16
only when I have my feet too close together.

Try skiing with a little more air between your feet/legs
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
only when I have my feet too close together.
...or when I tip my skis by pointing my knees rather than starting with the feet.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13
...or when I tip my skis by pointing my knees rather than starting with the feet.
This is a concept that I am struggling with. How do I tip my skiis without angulating my knees?
post #5 of 16
point with your knees is ok as long as you do so with the inside knee first or keep the shins parallel. It's when you move your outside knee In to get more angulation without getting your inside knee/foot out of the way.

If you start with your feet, new inside foot tipped to the little toe side, no knee to boot crash. We don't "ski" like this but it's a good focus to get the move more even.

DC
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
point with your knees is ok as long as you do so with the inside knee first or keep the shins parallel. It's when you move your outside knee In to get more angulation without getting your inside knee/foot out of the way.

If you start with your feet, new inside foot tipped to the little toe side, no knee to boot crash. We don't "ski" like this but it's a good focus to get the move more even.

DC
After skiing on one ski at a time for thirty years, it feels very odd to do it any other way. Thanks for the great advice.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellensdad
Does anyone else whack there downhill knee cap into there uphill boot during your turns? Any theories as to why this is happening. Thanks.
Because you have an A-Frame stance.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
If you start with your feet, new inside foot tipped to the little toe side, no knee to boot crash. We don't "ski" like this but it's a good focus to get the move more even.

DC
Why don't you ski "like this"????? If it's a good focus, it also should be a good practice.
post #9 of 16
The A-frame knee into boot reflects an imbalance between inside and outside legs each serving their own role. You are probably dominant in use of your outside lower leg to create your edging.

Try to use your outside leg in more of a stance and balance role, and your inside foot/leg in the role of creating edging angles.
Lenghten your outside leg (rather than colapse it to the inside) as you roll/tip your inside foot so the reflected RESULT is the inside knee leading (and staying out of the way). This inside foot movement will engage the inside leg to pull the CM to the inside of the turn and tip the outside leg, as a unit, along with it.

Explore this on flatter terrain at slower speeds than normal untill you can start your turns by rolling the new inside foot over and can continue to roll/tip it to create your turn shape. The outside will follow as you stand and balance on it.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB
Because you have an A-Frame stance.
sort of like this:
http://news.dipag.com/photo_Bode_Mil...000002674.html
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
Why don't you ski "like this"????? If it's a good focus, it also should be a good practice.
Not all exercises are necessarily the final goal. They are often just stepping stones to the final goal.

The exercise given if taken to it's extreme could result in a very sequential movement pattern. Not always the best option however it would be a great move to have in your bag of tricks.
post #12 of 16
I presumed "start with your feet" meant you were engaging both edges, so the move wouldn't be sequential.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcmeister
.
Try to use your outside leg in more of a stance and balance role, and your inside foot/leg in the role of creating edging angles.
Lenghten your outside leg (rather than colapse it to the inside) as you roll/tip your inside foot so the reflected RESULT is the inside knee leading (and staying out of the way). This inside foot movement will engage the inside leg to pull the CM to the inside of the turn and tip the outside leg, as a unit, along with it.
I just received the Canadian Ski Coaches Federation World 2005 DVD. It contains several minutes of WC guys and gals running through drills and just plain freeskiing during what looks to be a Summer training camp. The technique that Arcmeister describes can be seen in living color all over this DVD. It's amazing to see the best in the world freeski. There's a quick snippet of Ben Raich carving short slalom turns at slow to moderate speeds that brougth tears to my eyes. Incredible.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson
I presumed "start with your feet" meant you were engaging both edges, so the move wouldn't be sequential.
Thanks KB for the clarification and reminder how words don't always get interpreted the same way.

Often when teaching this exercise to start I will have the student "balance" on the up hill (new outside) ski and tip the new inside foot to the little toe side. This "moves" the knee and CM to the inside of the turn. Generally the CM moving across the feet will start the outside ski to begin to seek the fall line and a turn begins. If you take this exercise to the extreme, the inside foot/ski goes first the rest of the body follows. sequential move.

As the exercise progresses, then we begin to extend the outside leg while moving the CM forward and down the hill at the same time as the little toe move and the move becomes more simutaneous.

DC
post #15 of 16
Where can one get that DVD?
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLATZ
Where can one get that DVD?
http://www.snowpro.com/cscf/cscftv/index.htm
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