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Salomon Equipe 10 3V - opinions?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Has anybody used this as recreational ski? What can you tell me about it?
Thanks.
post #2 of 27
Ghost, you certainly like to evaluate all the options!!

I can't comment on the retail version but I have been using the Race-stock 3V slalom version this year and been happy with it. Probably not the ultimate sl ski in the gates (I won't try to support my choice by insisting it is the "best", it was simply a good deal at the time ) but I was happy with its performance. My slalom results can be blamed on the pilot, still treating gates like they were bamboo!!

It is also easy and fun to ski outside the course but, like any race-stock slalom, gives you a serious work-out.

I would also caveat that I have had very limited experience with other similar slalom skis so can't offer a comparative view. I do want to try the Volkl P60 sl next though.
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Yeah, and I keep finding deals on skis I haven't tried. It's not just the money;it's that I'm going to be stuck with my ski purchase for the next 10 years.
post #4 of 27
I hear you ghost, I like chasing deals as well!

If it is going to be your ski for 10 years do you really want to go with something as specialized as a slalom, even a retail version? Also while I like my Salomons I am not so sure I would be confident about them holding up over that period of time. I think that would point me towards Volkl or something similar.
post #5 of 27
one thing about Salomon skis,

You have to know the different type of skis.

There are the consumer 10.3v (equipe)
The race room 10.3v race with PWA and without race plate.
Then the full race version which I have never seen but only heard about.
Then the lab series.

Which one are you looking to get?

DC
post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 
It seemed very flexible longitudinally, and the plate that was full of holes for mounting a binding wasn't all that thick and didn't stiffen the ski much at all, so I would guess it was the consumer version.
post #7 of 27
I ski a 2001 10 3V equipe @ 176 cm. I think they may now be dead.

I'd suspect that any ski would die after 10 years.

Are the new ones still made of foam?
post #8 of 27
I know a bunch of kids who ski SL labs and GS labs, they're not that hard to come by.
post #9 of 27
I also had 3V's Super Axe in 716cm. They were a great all mountain ski. I have skied my son P60SL with motion POCS. They were easier then I figured. Less demanding then the P40SL. I can ski them in easy bumps and relax on them. But when I want to drive them like they were ment to be they are quick and demanding. Remember I'm over 50y/o my legs don't want to move that quickly for more then a dozen or so SL turns.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity
I also had 3V's Super Axe in 716cm.
Damn!!! And I thought my old 205's were long! :
post #11 of 27
If it had the "integrated" plate (lots of holes) it was probably the one just above the "consumer" version. It's a pretty nice ski but if you want an all around ski, it might be a little narrow. It's very quick underfoot and not very forgiving. It will launch you if you get in the back seat.

I love them as a front side groomer ski and I ski them just about everywhere.

DC
post #12 of 27

FIS Sidecut Rules and choosing a good slalom ski

dchan,

The Salomon 3V PWA is FIS compliant at 112-65-100 in 155cm and 165cm. That's considerably less sidecut than the non-fis compliant non-race stock versions.

Its also less sidecut than the Dynastar and Volkl semi-racestock-non-fis compliant skis. The P60 and Omeglass 64s.

I'm an instructor in NZ and looking for a slalom ski to do quick, fall line turns, aiming to move into carved short radius on tight slopes.

Are FIS compliant skis not side cut enough to carve a short radius turn at non-WC speeds?
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by NZskier
dchan,

The Salomon 3V PWA is FIS compliant at 112-65-100 in 155cm and 165cm. That's considerably less sidecut than the non-fis compliant non-race stock versions.

Its also less sidecut than the Dynastar and Volkl semi-racestock-non-fis compliant skis. The P60 and Omeglass 64s.

I'm an instructor in NZ and looking for a slalom ski to do quick, fall line turns, aiming to move into carved short radius on tight slopes.

Are FIS compliant skis not side cut enough to carve a short radius turn at non-WC speeds?
The FIS only regulates length (155/165) but there's no rules regarding sidecut or radius.

You see expert freeskiing slalom skis with larger sidecut than versions designed to actually ski gates because racers tend to be better at exerting force on thier skis. Racers are able to bend a straighter ski to make it turn enough to get through a course, whereas a less efficient expert on those same skis may not be able to make them turn slalom radius very easily. For that reason, expert all-mountain slalom skis are designed to make turning slalom more accessible.

However, race stock slaloms are getting quite shaped, some with tips as large as 119 (the Salomon LAB). So I guess the benefits of more shape can be felt by everyone.

The Salomons you are referring to are not race stock. They are a consumer slalom ski with gates in mind, whereas the Equipe 10 SC is a freeskiing slalom ski.

In terms of whether you're better off on a gate-specific ski or a more freeskiing oriented ski, that's a matter of choice. The best thing to do would be to demo. I would imagine that you would be satisfied with the amount you are able to turn any type of slalom ski.
post #14 of 27
I guess the new graphic shows more info now (04-05 and 05-06)
On my new skis, in the yellow area it says RACE.
On the consumer version it says Equip.
On the lab skis look at the Lifter plate. If it's a Lab it says it there.
All three of these say 10.3V

The Race makes a pretty nice short radius turn. Now if I could only make more than one or two good turns in a run (interspersed with the 30+ bad turns)
post #15 of 27
The Equipe 10 SC is a whole different line. Pilot bindings, big huge shovel. More of a free skiing ski with a SL side cut. It's a fun ski. Not as quick under foot as the 10.3v line.

DC
post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 
From my limited experience, I would have to say it's more a matter that the amount of work needed to cut tight slalom turns on a straight stiff ski will leave your legs in pain after a couple of hours, whereas a softer flexing more shapely ski will let you carve short turns all day without too much discomfort (stats provided for comparison purposes only;personal experience may vary).

EDIT: Every Salomon I've gotten my hands on IS a softer flexing ski.
post #17 of 27
Forgot something, I'm told the idea behind the plate is not so much to stiffen the ski but to give you some "lift" or leverage on the ski and to isolate the ski from the boot as far as interaction with the flex. The plate actually almost floats above the ski so the ski flexes more evenly with no affect on the release pressures on the bindings. The ones with the prolinks that are integrated into the plate would transfer pressure towards the tips and tails but not necessarily make the ski that much stiffer.

I'm relativly light so a softer ski is fine with me. Making SR turns on these skis for any length of time is a workout (talking about turns that are smaller than the sidecut will carve). I'm good for about 3-4 runs. Then I gotta go cruise for a while..

DC
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by D(C)
The FIS only regulates length (155/165) but there's no rules regarding sidecut or radius.

You see expert freeskiing slalom skis with larger sidecut than versions designed to actually ski gates because racers tend to be better at exerting force on thier skis. Racers are able to bend a straighter ski to make it turn enough to get through a course, whereas a less efficient expert on those same skis may not be able to make them turn slalom radius very easily. For that reason, expert all-mountain slalom skis are designed to make turning slalom more accessible.

However, race stock slaloms are getting quite shaped, some with tips as large as 119 (the Salomon LAB). So I guess the benefits of more shape can be felt by everyone.

The Salomons you are referring to are not race stock. They are a consumer slalom ski with gates in mind, whereas the Equipe 10 SC is a freeskiing slalom ski.

In terms of whether you're better off on a gate-specific ski or a more freeskiing oriented ski, that's a matter of choice. The best thing to do would be to demo. I would imagine that you would be satisfied with the amount you are able to turn any type of slalom ski.
There is a minimum waist width. I believe it is 60mm with no tolerance!
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan
I guess the new graphic shows more info now (04-05 and 05-06)
On my new skis, in the yellow area it says RACE.
On the consumer version it says Equip.
On the lab skis look at the Lifter plate. If it's a Lab it says it there.
All three of these say 10.3V
An easier way to tell,

03/04 165 SL Lab - Prolinks attached to front of Poweraxe plate
04/05 165 SL Lab - No prolinks, VIST/Lab plate
05/06 165 SL Lab - No prolinks, 2 piece VIST/Lab plate

The retail 165 3V's from at least 02/03 to current have always had unattached prolinks in some form on the front and rear.

-T
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman
There is a minimum waist width. I believe it is 60mm with no tolerance!
Yup, this is true! But it goes for all skis of any discipline...
post #21 of 27
FIS specs are here.

Key parts:

1.2 Restrictions
1.2.1 Geometric features
1.2.1.1 Ski length
Minimum length "developed" length (unwound length) in accordance with
ISO Norm including a measurement tolerance of +/- 1 cm. The ski length
has to be marked on the ski.
Downhill
Ladies WC/WSC/OWG: 210 cm
Ladies COC/FIS: 210 cm / -5 cm tolerance
Men WC/WSC/OWG: 215 cm
Men COC/FIS: 215 cm
Super-G
Ladies WC/WSC/OWG: 200 cm
Ladies COC/FIS: 200 cm / -5 cm tolerance
Ladies MAS (Giant Slalom Skis allowed): 180 cm / without tolerance
Men WC/WSC/OWG: 205 cm
Men COC/FIS: 205 cm / -5 cm tolerance
Men MAS (Giant Slalom Skis allowed): 185 cm / without tolerance
Children II (valid as from 2005/06): 175 cm
Giant Slalom
Ladies WC/WSC/OWG: 180 cm
Ladies COC/FIS: 180 cm / -5 cm tolerance
Ladies MAS: 180 cm / -5 cm tolerance
Men WC/WSC/OWG: 185 cm
Men COC/FIS: 185 cm / -5 cm tolerance
Men MAS: 185 cm / -5 cm tolerance
Slalom
Ladies (all categories): 155 cm
Men (all categories): 165 cm
Children I & II: 130 cm
MAS:
No length restriction for Ladies over 60 years and Men over 70 years.
Specifications for Competition Equipment 2004/2005
I:\GENRULES\EQT\Ausre-0405.doc/SR - 3 -
1.2.1.2 Profile width
Minimum width of the running surface at binding without any tolerance:
60 mm.
1.2.1.3 Radius
The radius has to be marked on the ski.
Downhill
Ladies & Men WC/WSC/OWG: minimum 45 m
Ladies & Men COC/FIS/MAS minimum 45 m
Radius measurement for DH skis with a preparation tolerance of -1 m.
Super-G
Ladies & Men: minimum 33 m
Children II (valid as from 2005/06): minimum 27 m
Giant Slalom
Ladies & Men: minimum 21 m
Children II: minimum 17 m
Children I: minimum 14 m
post #22 of 27

There's the rub...

I'll ask one final question on this thread:

03/04 Equipe 10 3V PWA 112-65-100 ->

I'm 220 Pound, NZSIA stage 1 instructor (PSIA Stage 2), already ski 170cm Volkl 724 Pro. I just sold my Volkl p60 163cm 2003s.

Looking for on piste, eastern USA style, groomer carver. I've found a pair of these skis online in both 155cm and 165cm for less than I can get them at pro-form.

Question:

For free-skiing, tight carves in the fall line and medium speeds with cross-under technique do I want the 155 or the 165?
post #23 of 27
165.

But don't expect too much from them.

I skiied the 04/05 165 at the start of the season, and was not impressed (I'm around 180lb)
post #24 of 27
I agree...get the 165. But realize that any slalom ski will have a speed limit.
post #25 of 27
D(C), have you skiied the current 3V?
I found it's yawn limit on an indoor slope...
post #26 of 27
I'm on the current 10.3V race (pwa race designated)

You want the 165. I'm skiing the 155 but I'm only 160lbs
Indoor slope, probably a yawn. Out on the firm pack fast snow, WHEEEE...

Keep them on edge and carve them in tight turns they are very quick under foot, and I have not really had any stability issues. Get off the toungues of your boots even for an instant and "Uh- Oh" : I probably don't go as fast as some of you wild skiers but I go fast enough to get the eyes tearing.
post #27 of 27
Well, I've just found out the shipping to New Zealand is $280 USD so suddenly they're not so cheap.

You may as well all have at them. At this price they are a bargain:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=21246&item=7148231 438&rd=1&ssPageName=WD1V

Enjoy,

(and post a review)
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