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Flexible off-the-shelf footbeds?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Until I can get to a good bootfitter to have custom ones made, I'd like to get hold of a pair of off-the-shelf footbeds to replace my old ones which have pretty well had it. There's a school of thinking (to which the controversial Mr Harb belongs) which says that the footbeds shouldn't be too rigid, as the ankle needs to be able to articulate within the boot. This makes a lot of sense to me. Does anyone know of any such flexible footbeds which I can get off-the-shelf? I've heard a recommendation for DownUnders, and I'm wondering whether there are any other candidates?
post #2 of 20
Try "shock doctors" they make a number of different footbeds .
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leeroy
Try "shock doctors" they make a number of different footbeds .
I'll check them out.
post #4 of 20

Superfeet

I recomment "Superfeet." I had a severe case of Plantar Faciaitis a few years ago (could barely walk) and the doctor recommended Superfeet. At the same time, I was fitted by a physical therapist for custom orthotics. To make a long story short, I now have Superfeet (green) in both my and my wifes ski boots, as well as various other Superfeet models (blues and blacks) in nearly everything from running shoes to everyday shoes. The custom orthotics never really did work out well and they are in a dresser drawer.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
I got the impression that Superfeet were one of the stiffer footbeds, with a quite firm posted arch. Isn't this the case?
post #6 of 20
Irrespective of the benefit of 'softer' footbeds once the foot is in and skiing, I have to report dissatisfaction when I tried some quite soft self-moulding EVA ones.

The biggest source of grief was in actually putting the boot on and removing it. The foot would crumple, crinkle or otherwise distort the footbed as the foot made its way into or out of the liner. Bah. Too soft: threw them out no matter how they skied. Barefoot better.

How soft do you wish to be?
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by J2R
I got the impression that Superfeet were one of the stiffer footbeds, with a quite firm posted arch. Isn't this the case?
I guess that is a relative question. Compared to the "blocks" of custom orthotics they are soft. Compared to some gel type footbed they are hard. I have no problem getting them into and out of the boots. All I am saying is they work for me. They may not work for you.
post #8 of 20
I did not have good luck with Superfeet and Down Under off the shelf footbeds. I found the Superfeet to be too stiff and the Down Unders were uncomfortable. I had InstaPrint footbeds made and those work fairly well. If I were to go the off the shelf route for a temp fix I'd probably try the Dr.Sholls type of footbeds that I use in my sneakers.
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by wilbur
I recomment "Superfeet." I had a severe case of Plantar Faciaitis a few years ago (could barely walk) and the doctor recommended Superfeet. At the same time, I was fitted by a physical therapist for custom orthotics. To make a long story short, I now have Superfeet (green) in both my and my wifes ski boots, as well as various other Superfeet models (blues and blacks) in nearly everything from running shoes to everyday shoes. The custom orthotics never really did work out well and they are in a dresser drawer.
What's the difference between the green, blue, and black ?? I'm having arch cramp issues and was think about getting superfeet.
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
I did not have good luck with Superfeet and Down Under off the shelf footbeds. I found the Superfeet to be too stiff and the Down Unders were uncomfortable. I had InstaPrint footbeds made and those work fairly well. If I were to go the off the shelf route for a temp fix I'd probably try the Dr.Sholls type of footbeds that I use in my sneakers.
And you are perfect testimony as to why every foot is different, and to why there are many different products available.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteevB
What's the difference between the green, blue, and black ?? I'm having arch cramp issues and was think about getting superfeet.
The greens are for those shoes where you can easily take out the factory insole. Asics running shoes, for example, come with a removable insole. My Rossi ski boots also had a removeable insole. The blues are for shoes where you can't remove the insole. I have those in some boat shoes and some dress shoes. The blacks supposely for dress shoes. I have the least luck with the blacks. I bought a pair and they weren't quite the right size and they are not being used. I am very happy with the greens and the blues though. P.S. I am not a superfeet representative or anything of the kind. I am just sharing what my own experiences are. In fact with my plantar faciaitis issue a few years back (most miserable) I am afraid not to use them for any activity on my feet. Wilbur.
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex
Irrespective of the benefit of 'softer' footbeds once the foot is in and skiing, I have to report dissatisfaction when I tried some quite soft self-moulding EVA ones.
Interested in your experience with these - I wasn't actually thinking of self-moulding ones.
post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max_501
I did not have good luck with Superfeet and Down Under off the shelf footbeds. I found the Superfeet to be too stiff and the Down Unders were uncomfortable. I had InstaPrint footbeds made and those work fairly well. If I were to go the off the shelf route for a temp fix I'd probably try the Dr.Sholls type of footbeds that I use in my sneakers.
Hmm, I thought there was an issue with using the kind of footbeds you use for running. Aren't they designed to deal with a quite different set of issues, namely the kind of movement the foot undergoes while running (the rolling/pronating), rather than the much more static environment of the ski boot?
post #14 of 20
I have used green Superfeet all this season, 80 hrs approx. They have been comfortable and show no signs of wear.

Greg
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by J2R
Interested in your experience with these - I wasn't actually thinking of self-moulding ones.
I really only wanted a softer, more enveloping forefoot, so I wound up glueing an EVA flat-pad onto the heelblock of a green Superfeet after I tore the green cheapfoam off. I think Superfeet makes a dress shoe insert (black) that is the heel cup only, in both mens' and women's (narrow heel) sizes.

Some pretty fancy cutting and trimming was required at the heel and in the arch area. The impression I brought away was that runners want gobs of arch support and no heel-lock or centering whatsoever???

I think walking or running is actually more effective than skiing for moulding these; something about the impact pressure I guess. Half a day skiing wasn't sufficient to leave any foot imprint at all on the foam. I'm not that delicate either.

The verdict: STILL not sure it was remotely worthwhile.
post #16 of 20
The Sole orthotics which I believe are available in any Red Wing outlet are the best units I have seen IF you need that much support. A person with a very loose mid foot and ankle structure would be difficult to support to a degree that would inhibit ankle movement. OTOH someone with a fairly neutral to suppinated ankle and/or rigid forefoot may find numerous problems with too much support including a feeling they can't use their ankle laterally.

In my experience much study for skiing has been made at the higher end of racing and those stats touted to support various theories. By nature of competition people with poor ankle/foot alignment are seldom if ever making it too that level of racing and therefore not included in these studies. Many or these theories then do not take into account the needs of the average joe/jill with sore feet giving rise to much of the controversy.

The sole footbed will do a terrific job for someone needing that amount of support and offers more support than those mentioned above. (Many of which are very good units for the right person.) The footbed is heat moldable to take off some support but I generally never suggest that unless there is a specific problem. It is an EVA material that has some give to it but under the arch is quite dense so does not give that easily or much. They retail for about $40Can which is very competitive and I assume similar in the states.
post #17 of 20
Ah, yes, I have 2 sets of those, really good for XC boots, US$30 at the local running shop:
http://www.itsyoursole.com/
post #18 of 20
I ski on full cork Superfeet, but can provide some info on the more flexible options that are available since I did go through most of them.

Superfeet Winter Green (~$30) - Outlast temperature control covering, firm support so your arch better match well (almost fully posted), high volume (thick)

Shock Doctor Ultra2 LP (~$30) - Medium support, not very contoured (didn't seem to follow the organic form of most feet), low volume (thin)

Sidas Volcano (~$30) - Warm velvet covering, softer support (arch is allowed to collapse by design), nice contours, medium volume

Sidas Super Step-in+ Snow (~$60) - Comfy covering, medium support (arch can collapse, but firmer than the Volcano), great metatarsal support, semi-customizable by heating with a hair dryer, low volume

YourSole (~$40) - Customizable through heating in a toaster over, medium support (arch collapses, but not by design), low volume and medium volume available

My favorite off-the-shelf footbed is the Sidas Volcano. It just fits my foot really well without any modification. The collapsable arch (by design) works out really well with Thermoflex liners molded to them.
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler
My favorite off-the-shelf footbed is the Sidas Volcano. It just fits my foot really well without any modification. The collapsable arch (by design) works out really well with Thermoflex liners molded to them.
Is this the same thing as the Conform'able, do you think? Conform'ables are made by Sidas.
post #20 of 20
I have wide fat and flat feet, I have a pair of the green superfeet in my new boots (Head S12) they have been great so far (6 or so ski days on them). I still need to get my boots blown out a bit because of my damn sausage feet but the support from the superfeet is great, especially for $40. I am considering getting orthotics if my health plan will cover it, mainly for running since I get intense shin splints now.
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