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So, who's got SPEED skis?

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
I've been eyeing some pairs at "the undisclosed location" - http://www.racestocksports.com/SpeedSkis.htm

I think I may need a pair. Who's got some? They look like fun, but I don't really know much about them. 1/2 of one, 6 dozen of the other. As it is, I'd probably choose now based on cooler topsheets (winner - Volkl) or brand loyalty (again - Volkl). I'm thinking I'd like to use these for some early morning runs to get the lead out, as well as civilian speed events such as the Stowe SG, and the Jay downhill. On that note, what other civilian speed events do you know of?
post #2 of 34
I thought the post was referring to Speed skis... 240cm rocket designed only for maximum velocity.

http://www.speedski.com/

Upon further reading and opening the link, Alpine speed event skis became the topic. DH and SG. Of those, I have 2 pair of each;
215 and 210 DH
209 and 201 SG

They are fun.
post #3 of 34
I am under the impression that the current slang for DH skis is speed skis. ie, A local shop only demos "speed skis" and by that they mean DH skis.
post #4 of 34
I have an antique pair of SG skis, 208 cm Kästle National Team. They make a great High speed cruizing ski. I don't think I ever spent 200 bucks on a wax job though.
post #5 of 34
I wish I had a pair last week for the Snowshoe 24.... It's really strange to be in a tuck and get slowly passed by a guy on some huge 213's. Kind of like being on the freeway and getting passed by a semi.

-T
post #6 of 34
The specialized 240 cm speedskis are nonsense for anything but speedskiing events.
I inspected a pair of Dynamics some time ago. I don´t remember the dimensions but I know that the calculated radius was more than 90 meters. I wouldn´t want to have to turn on them.

IMO the 209 cm SG or even 215 cm DH skis are enough for the biggest fan of speeds to use in the early morning runs.

The SG skis with radius about 35 meters are a great tool to use for long(er) radius turns and not to be embarassed by the 25+ radiuses some longer GS skis have.
I love to ski them whenever I find suitable conditions - not just to go fast but also to have to master a ski which is not as easy to handle as a common shaped ski.

Most people don´t understand this. I guess mainly because they got used to skis with small radiuses and more or less lost the skills long skis with little sidecut require.

Is skiing such long skis (becoming) an elitarian thing?
post #7 of 34
In my opinion long shaped (=new) skis are already an elitarian thing.
post #8 of 34
I was at a Masters race this season where one of the forerunners was on 240cm downhill skis. This was a slalom race. His time was respectable.

The big question is:
Will your resort allow you to ski fast enough to use those ekis? Can you do slalom turns as required to keep them under control when in crowds? Turning a DH is different from turning a GS ski- things happen in slow motion. A lot of our juniors run longer 26+M GS skis instead of downhills until their skillsets and physical size allow them to handle a real speed event ski.
post #9 of 34
Considering the remarks I sometimes hear or opinions I read I´m not so sure about how most people take a man carrying 210 cm planks.
I suspect less as an elite skier and more as a moron...
post #10 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike
I was at a Masters race this season where one of the forerunners was on 240cm downhill skis. This was a slalom race. His time was respectable.
The big question is:
Will your resort allow you to ski fast enough to use those ekis? Can you do slalom turns as required to keep them under control when in crowds?
What brings a racer to use 240cm skis in a slalom course? Was it a stake?
I thought I was crazy enough to have tried SG skis in GS (not a race of course)...
Btw, I don´t recall any 240cm DH skis. The longest I can remember were 230 cm from quite long ago. 225 or 223 were common later, then 218 cm.
I may be wrong, though.

The big question: I have never encountered a resort or lift company dictating how fast you may ski but afaik it´s different in NA and Europe.
I think (or at least hope) no one normally enjoys skiing such specialized long skis when "in crowds".
I´m seldom lazy to get up very early to start skiing at 7 and have the run just for myself without crowds till 8 or 8:30.
post #11 of 34
I've only been told to slow down once (they told me they didn't allow skiing in a tuck: , I can't remember where), but the thing is that in southern Ontario Canada, even if you shush the hill (yes even the double blacks at blue mountain), your speed will not be that high; you will be most of the way to the lift and another 50m and it will be time to apply the brakes. If you care to make some turns, you end up spending most of your time at speeds well below the sweet spot where your skis really come alive and reward you for having had the forthought to pay the premium price they commanded, at speeds where many many other skis would perform better. Maybe it would be different on shorter SG skis?
post #12 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike
The big question is:
Will your resort allow you to ski fast enough to use those ekis? Can you do slalom turns as required to keep them under control when in crowds? Turning a DH is different from turning a GS ski- things happen in slow motion. A lot of our juniors run longer 26+M GS skis instead of downhills until their skillsets and physical size allow them to handle a real speed event ski.
Like I said, very early morning runs (or midweek in January ), and in race courses. I'm thinking SG, 210ish.
post #13 of 34
Quote:

Originally posted by Epic
On that note, what other civilian speed events do you know of?
There is also the Ragged Mountain Downhill, normally run in March
post #14 of 34
I used to free ski on 223s in the late 70s - early 80s. That was the norm for large men. Women used 215s and amazons like Cindy Nelson and mustaschiod Nazis used 218s.

While the skis were liable to bend if you hit moguls too hard, you could make the turn respectablly fast. Their edges were thinner than other skis, which made them more delicate, but the old K2 DHs had normal stock edges which were more practical.

If you do alot of cliff or gelande jumping I think the longer 215s are still popular. The true speed skiing skis are 230 by regulation, I think. They do not really turn (straight sidecut).
post #15 of 34
speed skis are fun...i've got a 204 SG and 210 DH (dynastar women world cup stock) i'd be happy to sell as i can get more. they are super fast but may not be FIS legal anymore(to much sidecut) they include bindings and plates and if you send me your boot sole length i'll mount them for you...

PM if interested

i too do not recall dh boards longer than 235, i used to do a lot of wax/base/edge prep for the cdn speed ski team (womens world champion used my skis)
can you imagine dulling a 240cm ski from tip to tail so no edge catches or even touches snow? been there done that...
post #16 of 34
I have a pair of Atomic 221cm downhills with Ess Var 6-14 bindings and plates. When I was able to ski more I took them out in the AM and were awsome. They are like riding a rail and nothing bothers them, very stable at speed. We also would do short swings on these (they turn very well even in shorter turns) and then would get on a pair of SL's, talk about rebound. Beware of used long skis, most of them have been bent at sometime if they were skied much. I might part with mine if you are interested. I am the orginal owner, bases and edges are perfect. Most important they are not bent. Unless Bodie is cruising buy you will not get passed on these.
post #17 of 34
Eric did it for fun- no other reason. Like Plake, he just likes those long boards, athough the 240s are just a tad long for shortswing. He's just a crazy downhiller. To be honest, I have no idea if they were speed skis or DH boards. I didn't look at them all that close except to notice the length. This is a guy who wears a speed suit/helmet for Arctic Man, so it could be either one.

Patrol at a lot of resorts defines too fast as anything not skidded from the backseat. In slow areas I get flagged by patrol for doing slalom turns while I'm being passed by boarders windmilling their arms for balance. Maybe they flag me because I CAN slow down at that point. Picabo had her pass pulled at a resort last season for skiing too fast. It happens.

There are rare instances when I'll ride up with the juniors for early ride (1/2 hour before the lifts open) and try to let them run a bit. 50 is about as fast as I'm comfortable skiing before I throw on the brakes, and the visibility and hill conditions have to be pretty good for me to ski that fast with any confidence. I just am not built for speed.
post #18 of 34
We have four pair 212 Atomic 212cm DH 33M, 204Sg 30M
210cm DH 40M, 201 Sg 33M, Al have 10.18's.

These all are pretty much like skiing back in the day. Although once you're going fast enough thew SG's are like Gs's

YOu must get up some speed and then be patient. They just don't hook up like what we ski on now.

Although my ski back in high school was a 210 Hart Javelin GS. (1968-1970)

I got pulled over twice by the patrol(Crystal Mt., WA) in the same day on a pair of 215 Atomic SG probably around 1980-82. Tucking was the no-no!
post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by madeinchina
I used to free ski on 223s in the late 70s - early 80s. That was the norm for large men. Women used 215s and amazons like Cindy Nelson and mustaschiod Nazis used 218s.
I think Annemarie Moser, then Moser-Pröll, even used 225 cm mens skis sometimes.
Why not: if Heini Hemmi could win on 215cm GS skis, 50 cm longer than himself...
post #20 of 34
Annemarie could probably have been a top ten male racer. None of the other girls had her cojones.
post #21 of 34
There are two guys who both ski on one pair of skis ("skitandem") and who even hold the speed world record for their own category 195.65 kmh (Les Arcs, France).

http://www.speedski-cz.com/download/.../skitandem.jpg

Surprisingly enough I have never measured their skis although they are made by the Czech manufacturer SPORTEN which I´m doing some testing, tuning and marketing for.
They are longer than 240 cm, maybe 270 cm.
http://www.speedski-cz.com/download/...S-2004-107.jpg


Btw, "skitandem" is also used to introduce blind people to skiing or to enable them enjoy the sport. The authors would like to introduce the method at the 2006 Winter Olympics.

http://www.speedski-cz.com/html/modu...showpage&pid=1
post #22 of 34
Imagine what happens to the rear skier during a crash. Seems like it would be a fun couples event, especially if they had to tuck together.

If you really want big, long skis, try jumping skis. The standard adult size is 240cm, and ~180mm wide. I think the ski-flying skis are even larger.
post #23 of 34
There were crashes of course: I don´t have to "imagine" I simply can ask or even put the following link:
http://www.speedski-cz.com/download/...m/P4190043.jpg

I never said I wanted "big long skis". If I did I could ask those two guys or at the factory.
Neither do I want to ski on jumping skis. I saw a man trying them in a speedskiing race. He was lucky enough to bring them to stop and never took them again.

Btw, the SPORTEN jumping skis go to 276 cm but they are definitely not 180 mm wide (not even the squal/monocarver was). The 04/05 catalog says 115-105-115.
post #24 of 34
I jumped (low and slow) in college and still have a pair of wooden jumping skis from the 1970s, and they are at least 6 inches wide (150cm). They were impossible to turn except for one long snowplow to stop. It pains me to think about it at all. But with proper training (not beer and dope before jumping, as we used to do) it must be fun.
post #25 of 34
Well, I don´t know what the specs were back then but the current are:

Nordic Competition Equipment, 1.2.1.2. Profile with + enclosure:

"maximum width at front portion = 115 mm"
"maximum width at 57% of front portion (f) = 105 mm"
"maximum width at tail portion = 115 mm"

http://www.fis-ski.com/data/document/specificationsforcompetitionequipmentandcommerical markings2004-2005.pdf

Therefore the dimensions 115-105-115 I have quoted.
SPORTEN junping skis are used on the World Cup.

Which in no way should spoil your memories of jumping, no matter how "low and slow" or "high and fast".
post #26 of 34
Jumping is one of the stupidest and most dangerous things I think of. Put 40lb giant skis on with non-releasable beartrap bindings, then go down a one-way track with no option to bail out, off a jump with a looong run-out. It is hard to get killed but really easy to get torn.
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
There are two guys who both ski on one pair of skis ("skitandem") and who even hold the speed world record for their own category 195.65 kmh (Les Arcs, France).
I had that done last Tuesday. Cost me a $15 co-pay, but it was well worth it.

post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by carvemeister
I had that done last Tuesday. Cost me a $15 co-pay, but it was well worth it.

I don´t quite get what you had done: a ride? the world record?
Where? When? How?
post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
I don´t quite get what you had done: a ride? the world record?
Where? When? How?
Think of a medical visit for men over 50.:
post #30 of 34
racestocksports.com

I tried to add the page to My Favourites but it links to some dodgy (non-ski) "warez" site.

Is this a legit place? If so, they really need to work on this problem - it makes me think I can't trust them at all.
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