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Snowboard/Monoski....What is the difference? - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15
Fernie, glad you like it! What brand/model do you use? Why not Teleboard? You can use your ski boots. Are you saying snowboard can't go down fall line or make small fall line turns? Extremecarver says you can't change direction quickly on a mono ski. (I think both can turn quick and go downhill.)

For me the downside is icy conditions what ever kind of board(s) I'm trying to use. But yeah, 2 is better than one on the clear snow.
I mostly skied a Rossignol Extreme (pintail) 200cm. I also have a White Knuckle All Mountain in a 194cm. I'm not saying that snowboards can't do falline turns, the mechanics are much different that's all. Soft moguls on a mono are fun to rip up, they don't look like as much fun on a snowboard. I prefered the mono over snowboard. But mono, snowboard, telemark, alpine, they're all good, each has it's own advantages.
I've never had a chance to try a teleboard, as a matter of fact I've never seen anyone ever ride one. I would give it a try if I got the chance.

Yes you just use regular ski boots and bindings on a monoski, I had solomon bindings (the only one out there approved for monoskis) and Riakcle(sp?) boots.

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #32 of 50
Skiing down straight the fallline with a snowboard is no fun at all.
You are not stable, thats the problem. As well you are prone to catch an edge. It is easy on a detuned freeride or freestyle board, but nearly impossible at high speeds on a raceboard.
My claim for quick direction changes bases on the following assumption. I have never been on a mono. To turn on a snowboard you have to (to make it simple) 2 possibilities. 1. Lean inside. 2. Push with on leg into one direction to change the direction. this is easiest with wide stance, low angles. I cannot immagine doing this on a mono. Or has anyone ever done something more than a 360 over a jump on a mono? That's what I mean. Down the fall line direction change should be easy on a mono, while carving very hard.

Correct me if I am wrong. I have to give monoski as well as skwal a try next year.
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomK
Sorry, but this proves to my satisfaction that you've not been on either single plank. Over & out.
Does ANYONE on this fourm do anything but complain, argue, and insult people?

Each person has a different perpesctived, and theory about everything. Lets just exachange and discuss thing dam, grow the **** up. Sorry for the language, but come on.

Mono skiing is more of speed and straight line performance from my experience.
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferniefreeheels
I mostly skied a Rossignol Extreme (pintail) 200cm. I also have a White Knuckle All Mountain in a 194cm. I'm not saying that snowboards can't do falline turns, the mechanics are much different that's all. Soft moguls on a mono are fun to rip up, they don't look like as much fun on a snowboard.
LONG boards! My teleboard is 180ish, but I'm looking at the 191. I love long boards, I need to compensate for my small...skis! I love to rip up soft bumps on a snowboard but I'm not normal. It is easier on the teleboard, a more forward facing stance and poles help a lot. Try skiing bumps without poles to understand one reason snowboard in bumps is difficult.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferniefreeheel
I've never had a chance to try a teleboard, as a matter of fact I've never seen anyone ever ride one. I would give it a try if I got the chance.
HAHA! I only saw two guys teleboard, the two guys who agreed to try mine! My teleboard is the only one I've seen. I read a couple positive reviews and mail ordered one. It's fun!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferniefreeheel
Yes you just use regular ski boots and bindings on a monoski
I meant you could use your regular ski boots on a teleboard, Ferniefreeheel! For bumps and powder, you may be better off on the mono, teleboard can go anywhere but really shines on fresh groom, I think it has more sidecut than monoski and is more like a carving board or sqwall, but I don't know for sure, I never monoskied. I never tried teleboard in powder, I rarely get in powder and when I do, I want to ski it.

I don't think anyone who is expert on mono and snowboard has responded to this thread, no one really knows the answer to the original question, so we speculate. Monoski (like teleboard) is a fringe sport and I don't think snowboarders want to try it. Skiers who are willing to try it and get into it are probably not likely to snowboard.
post #35 of 50
Go over to extremecarving.com There are some of the best snowboarders who monoski occasionally too. They did ski in their past too. Pose the question there, maybe you get an answer as France is the homespot for monoskis and many french visit the forum.
post #36 of 50
I've skied a monoski in France and I can tell you that it is simply an inferior piece of ski technology. You can learn to use it well, etc - but why bother? There is nothing a monoski can do that skis can't do much better.

And if you don't have good powder a monoski goes from being inferior to vastly inferior.
With today's powder skis there is no need for monoskis - except as a punchline.

[EDIT:]I hate the monski, so ignore my comments.
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15

I don't think anyone who is expert on mono and snowboard has responded to this thread, no one really knows the answer to the original question, so we speculate. Monoski (like teleboard) is a fringe sport and I don't think snowboarders want to try it. Skiers who are willing to try it and get into it are probably not likely to snowboard.
I have never monoboarded, However, I am a National caliber snowboard coach, specializing in alpine. USASA, AASI, and USSA Certified. I Also have fairly extensive ski experience.

The Mono ski and the snowboard are not the same. In snowboarding we look at board performances. There are four: Pivot. Tilt. Twist (torsionally). and Flex. These are performances that a good rider can make the board do. Two of which skiers cannot do: Twist and flex. Yes... Skis twist and flex. However, Unlike a snowboarder, the skier cannot make them do it on their own, they require additional forces exerted on the equipment by the snow. A snowboarder can make t he board do each performance, lying on his back with the board strapped on and sticking up in the air. The Skier can only pivot and tilt. likewise, because of the configuration of the monoski, Physics denies that it can all four performances.

Thus, I pose that definition is based on performances...not measurement or stats or anything else.

Furthermore (Telerod) The Teleboard would technically count as a snowboard based on performances (although I'm not sure I could Flex my board with my feet locked in due to the nature of the free heel...this is usually accomplished by lifting the fromnt toe and back Heel...of course I am old fat and inflexible), but does not legally qualify (based on FIS rules) for snowboard events due to its waist width. That doesn't stop me from loving the thing...It is a go anywhere do anything all mountain tool...

my $0.02
post #38 of 50
Thread Starter 
Thank you SirMack
post #39 of 50
Interesting, SirMack, but I don't believe active flexing or twisting of the snowboard are important or necessary to riding a snowboard. I see how based on board performances, mono is a ski and snowboard is a snowboard and teleboard resists classification because the close stance and free heel would not allow significant twisting or flexing imputs from the rider. Sqwall is too narrow to be allowed in snowboard competition but can be flexed and twisted by the rider so is also in a gray area.
post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15


The video that I saw of Glen Plake monoskiing bumps he changed direction at least four times per sec.
I have that video, and you are correct. : = Plake
post #41 of 50
not to be insulting telerod...but then you obviously haven't spent much time on a board (which is not unsual for folks here on Epic). Twist is used for quicker edge transition, espescially useful in the bumps...and flex can be used to change the radius of a turn. The other place the ablity to flex the board is useful is also nin the bumps, where you can increase the camber as you go over the bump, keeping the nose of the board pressing foward and more of the board in contact with the snow. this keep one from getting thrown into the backseat...
post #42 of 50

My spin.

When I was skiing Chamonix twenty years ago, the Monoski was the rage. All the French were doing it. I have always wondered why it lost it's popularity to snow boarding. Perhaps it would be due to the fact that the snowboard boots are more comfortable, maybe it would be that it's an easy transition from skate boarding. Personally, I have never tried either.
post #43 of 50
A Little History is in Order here. in the 60's skiers such as Mike Doyle were getting into skiing. He and a couple of other guys were looking at the two planks and wondering since you had to work both feet and deal with 4 edges what would happen if you made two skis into one. It was the birth of the mono ski. Doyle took his idea to Bill Baine a Surfboard manufaturer in the San diego areaa they bought up some old ski making equipment from Hexal skis. They started making a few boards and other surfers saw the it as beeing pretty cool and easier to learn then useing two skis. The Mono was very popular with surfers who also liked to play in the snow. Most of these guys were Big Eave riders and had littel fear of anything. They took on the steepest lines at places like Jackson Hole. Other Surfers saw this and being inventive started to play with a board that would have a more Surfer style stance and less locked into the board as you were with the skiboats and binding of the mono ski. So we have the evolution from skiing to mono skiing to snowboards. I have many friends who were there at the birth of snowboarding back in the mid 1970's At one point Surfer mag printed a plan so that you could make your own snowboard from plywood fiberglass and some nylon strapes. It was crud but fun in Powder. Buton may have been the first to see the big picture he saw that snowboarding could be something big.
Like windsurfing The French took to mono skiing in a big way. it was invented in Ca by surfers and exported to France and Europe. Then came back to the US.
surfers have had a big part in the develupment of modren gravity sports
Think about this both skiing and Surfing are very much a part of ancient cultures that blended these sports with thier religion and legands. Both were very much a part of who those early people were. Skiing and surfings beginings are lost in Perhistory. Yet both maybe the first recorded sports, Ancient Rock art in Norway depicts skiing. and Rock art in Hawaii depicts Surfing. In short playing with gravity and the forces of nature has been a fun fora pretty long time. Long live gravity!
post #44 of 50
>>Skiing and surfings beginings are lost in Perhistory. Yet both maybe the first recorded sports, Ancient Rock art in Norway depicts skiing. and Rock art in Hawaii depicts Surfing. << Hunting would be the first sport and the first recorded. Javelin throwing or Spear-chucking the oldest competition. I still want to know why Monoskiing lost it's popularity to Boarding.
post #45 of 50
the easy answer on why is that it was illegal. noplace let you do it. thus parents thought it bad. children had to rebel. snowboarding became popular...

monoskiing was never thought of as "Bad", but only wierd...
post #46 of 50
Actually, I though all those French gals on monoskiis were rather cute, not weird.
post #47 of 50
I've just briefly tried to mono in the 80's, when it was indeed the craze in france. I was, say, unconvinced... and anyway broke my rented mono after a few hours.
Those days there is some kind of mini-revival of the thing on french slopes. It still uncommon, but far more frequent than skwal.
For those who read french, the French Monoski association http://monoski.free.fr/.
Some videos here : http://www.tvmountain.com/glisse/index.htm#mono

(yes, that does not answer the question...)
post #48 of 50
Sir Mack, you are right. I stand corrected. Check out http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=17760 see post #60. I could have used your help! I remember thinking Jack M was full of beans (impossible to flex board in soft boots!?) but I guess I let him influence my thinking on this. Still I think it is a fine tuning of turn shape, not as important as edging or turning imputs. I do think one can snowboard a very long time and quite well without actively flexing or twisting her/his board. However, I learned from another Epic thread that twisting is the way beginners are currently being introduced to turning.
post #49 of 50

I've monoskied for ~30 years IMO the reason the monoski NEver caught on was the VERY steep and painful learning curve AND incorrectly positioned & fitted bindings, The ski centre point is critical on a monoski, using the manufacturers recommended centre is usually incorrect, beginners need a different central point to experts,  Todays rental bindings make this adjustment much easier, to achieve. and the Latest monoskis are at least a match for anything else you'll see on the slopes.

In proper use [ a steep off piste slope] a monoski is fantastic to ride, and quite unlike any other snowstick. the enjoyment levels cannot be matched by 2 skis or a board.

Try one - if you progress to a reasonable level you'll love monoskiing, but probably you'll fail to make that level, and give up monoskiing and critcise them just like most other posters on this forum.

Which is why Monoskiing is thankfully an experts only ski. So next time you see a decent Monoskier give him a wide berth coz he/she has the ability to easliy blow you away whatever the snow conditons, and whatever you're riding if he so wished [ It gets boring doing so after 30 years believe me] So I normally leave all the sad looking Dorks on their boards or worse still the 2 stick beginner to their dreamworld rolleyes.gif


Edited by Badmono - 10/20/11 at 3:34am
post #50 of 50

^^^^^^^ Wha?

 

Experts only? You're killing a micro industry man! Attitudes like that will leave any monoskiers to the dregs of searching ebay for old crappy abused equipment because there was no longer a profit to the board manufacturers.

 

I totally disagree with badmono except for the fact that monoski bashing emanates from someone who just couldn't rap their head around the idea of keeping your knees together (touching), pointing them in the direction you want to go (on shaped monos), always turning while staying above the "stall speed", and never reverting to "skiing" techiniques (which usually result in you separating your knees, and then you fall.)

 

When I started riding a monoski I thought it would be the height of challenge on new equipment. After two seasons of riding them I can say that it is half as difficult as skiing. If we lived in a world where the monoski was first on the scene, skiing on two skis would look even more absurd and be a deathly experience. All the "that guys on a monoski!" .... so effin what. Its gotten so bad that I have really trashed my two ski technique and feel on the verge of major knee injury when on them. I can ski twice as long on anything (yes, preferably not ice) and never have sore knees. The steepness of any learning curve is simply departing from separate leg movements and its not steep at all unless you get caught in some mental rut with it. The painfullness of any learning curve is what? Falling on your hips repeatedly? I'll take that over pretzel twisting, orthopedic surgeon wallet fattening yard sales.

 

This whole monoskiing thing - the bashing, the opinions, the stigma, etc. It just cracks me up. I wish more people would try it on modern boards. Yeah, you can't skate, your triceps will be sore from pole pushing, you can't skin with one, the most dangerous trail or line on any mountain is the lift line, etc. I can see those as valid arguments. But vehement hatred of monoskiing? Claims that monoskiers are a danger to others on the mountain? Labels of inferior status as equipment? Monoskis being gay (WTF? everybody looked a bit flamboyant in the 80's, no?)?

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