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Helmets????

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Last week at Kirkwood I skiied a few runs that let me build up a lot of speed which was a blast. However, as I was going down the hill I had a vision of "What if" what if I fell at this speed and hit a tree or something. What would happen to my melon? Now that I just turned 30 I think i'm getting paranoid or something. I am asking for any advice on what to look for in a helmet and what are some reputable brands. Any helmet advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Double D
post #2 of 17
A. GET ONE THAT FITS! It´s almost as important as buying the right pair of boots.
B. Get one as light as possible, yet heavy enough to protect your head on impact.
C. Don´t listen to your friends, other than me.
D. Boeri, ProTec, Briko, Red, Giro...
post #3 of 17
At Summer race camp I skied without a helmet for the first time in years, mainly because of the temperature. I felt rather exposed, so I put mine on after lunch. That same day I caught an edge in a slush pile and went down head first. When I got up I found my helmet had come to rest next to a partially covered rock, which left a 1/2" deep gouge on the helmet. That could have been my day, week, season, and possibly life right there. I'm sold.

Find a helmet that fits and that is comfortable enough that you will wear it without a second thought. I prefer shorty helmets when freeskiing (personal preference is the Giro Nine 9), because I've found a lot of the full helmets whistle at certain speeds, make hearing difficult, and sometimes don't keep my ears as warm. Might just be me, though. Get fitted by a good shop, because helmets (and heads) come in all shapes and sizes.
post #4 of 17
In ski magazine, forum under general I started "another reason for helmets". If you want to read that go ahead.
As for cold ears, I wear Turtle Furs Shellaclaver that works well under full helmets in keeping my ears warm. I have tried other brands, they don't seem to fit as well.

Alaska Mike,
Lucky for you, that you had your helmet on. I know what you mean about feeling exposed. I've only skied onetime in the last 8 years with out my helmet. Never again.

double down 11,
Try on all kinds of helmets, like boot some fit better then others. I've come close to wearing my full face Bell Pro Mountain bike helmet at times, but it is missing a goggle strap clip. I'll have to work on my mind to get me to wear it all winter, with the full face it would keep my chin from hiting the hard snow if or when I do the next face plant.
post #5 of 17
Alaska Mike good for you! By the way if anybody wants motivation, I can post pictures of the two big wounds in my head after a fall on rocks at Big sky 3 weeks ago: 23 stitches, I have a Giro Nine.9 now and people who've seen me went and bought one too...

The brand doesn't matter. Buy one that fits and that is certified to a norm you trust.

YA [Edit using a keyboard: this hand-writing recognition on my tablet pc doesn't work that well with me...]

[ February 27, 2003, 02:17 PM: Message edited by: Ladede ]
post #6 of 17
Alaska Mike good for you! By the way if anybody wants motivation, I can post pictures of the two big wounds in my head after Fall on rocks at Big sky 3 weeks ago: 23 stitches, I hare a Giro Nine.9 now and people who've seen me went and bought one too...

The brand doesn't matter. Buy one that fits and that is certified to a norm you trust.

YA
post #7 of 17
Go get one now. This is my first year with a helmet and I'm a full convert. In 27 years of skiing I have never had a fall in which a helmet would have done me any good. So I viewed the need for one with some skepticism.

But I thought about it, I would estimate my typical cruising speed on fast cruisers in the 35-45 mph range and I've probably hit speeds close to 60 if not higher on occasion really opening it up. I've fallen more times than I can count over the years. On the other hand I road bike in the summer. Cruise at between 17-25 mph and occasionally max out around 40 or so. I've fallen twice, both VERY low speed (basically forgot to clip out of the pedals when coming to a stop)...more like tipping over (probably very funny to watch. I would never even consider riding my bike without a helmet. That bit of logic was all it took.

Advice:
1) Go get a helmet, now.
2) Make sure it fits, snug but not too tight. Try on different styles and brands to find what works for you.
3) Make sure your goggles match up with it so you aren't left with a bare space between them.
4) Make sure it fits.

I got a Boeri and love it. It's light, comfortable, and warmer than my beloved Moriarty hat.
post #8 of 17
I concurr with all of the advise given here but I would add one thing. If your going 30+ MPH and just hauling tail a helmet is not going to save you life if you get up close & personal with a tree. All it's going to do is keep you head in one piece.

Beyond getting a helmet...stay within your limits.
post #9 of 17
I wear a helmet when running gates. Head injury is not the reason, it is just that a gate hurts when you get it on the side of the melon.

I lost a friend last week due to head injury from an onhill collision with another skier. He was wearing a current race helmet at the time, not the boarding type open ear variety. Being aware of your surroundings and expecting everyone else on the mountain is a moron is better protection.
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by BetaRacer:
Being aware of your surroundings and expecting everyone else on the mountain is a moron is better protection.
Exactly. Common sense is your best protection.

B - comiserations on your loss

[ February 27, 2003, 10:58 PM: Message edited by: kiwiski ]
post #11 of 17
Not all ski helmets will pass SNELL cert requirements (I can think of two). If you are going to wear a helmet make sure it is backed by some kind of standard, otherwise what's the point?
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice everyone. Last week I was doing a little tree skiing at Northstar. I hit a tree root that had been covered by about 6" of powder which sent me flying. I missed the trees but convinced myself I need to buy a helmet.
post #13 of 17
DoubleDown 11 -

Since you live in an area where there is lots of spring skiing you should look for a helmet that is well ventilated or has removable ear-covers. The Boeri Axis Rage and Giro 9 fit that bill but there are lots of other models with similar features.

Everyone here keeps talking about the safety aspect of helmets but there are many other benefits. They are the warmest & driest ski hat you'll ever find (the wet West Coast snow doesn't stick to them). They do a great job keeping snow off the tops of your goggle which keeps them from fogging up. Also, they keep you goggles on your face when you fall on powder days preventing them from filling with snow. Most of the people I've talked into buying helmets have never had a need for them but love them for all the other reasons.
post #14 of 17
There are a number of good brands out there, basically all the helmets at a ski shop will protect you. Boeri, Giro, Leedom, Briko, Joffe are the names I see most. The key is to find the helmet that fits your head. Just as some footware is good for people with high arches & another is good for narrow heels, helmets also give a different fit by manufacturer and by line. Some are good for rounder heads, some for more oval heads. You have to try on helmets, not go with one type that's recommended by someone. In my family, Briko fits me and my husband and daughter wear Boeri.

The helmet needs to fit tightly. No hats underneath, but a balaclava or turtlefur's shelaclava is great.

Try on helmets even if you hate the color or graphic. If it offers the best fit, the shop can probably order one in the correct color for you. The shop should measure your head first so you know your size.

There are also different styles, full helmets, shorties, helmets that are somewhere in the middle. If you race or go on expert terrain, get a fuller helmet. Actually, as far as I'm concerned, get a fuller helmet no matter what you do. If you want to protect your head, then protect it.
post #15 of 17
This site is aimed at parents with kids, but the information still applies to adults. Kids On Lids

(disclosure: I'm the On-Mountain Rep for OVO Helmets)
For venting and removable ear flaps and washable liner and meeting the new ASTM F2040 standard and CE EN1077, try the Awol.

Jim
post #16 of 17
I was a helmet holdout for most of my 30+ plus years of skiing. After another concussion last year I started wearing one (Giro 9) this season. It is very light and most of the time I forget I am wearing it. The only negative is more wind noise than when wearing a hat.
post #17 of 17
I agree that fit is the key. I bought a giro this year and I love it. Actually more comfortable than a hat...nice features for varying temps and very lightwieght (hopefully not too light???)
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