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A Poll of Sorts: Which Ski for Your Exams this Season?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
To those of you taking PSIA (or other) exams this season, which skis did you use or are you planning to use in the exam, and in what division?

I'm not taking any exams this season, but if I were, I'd use my Rossignol 9S Oversizes.
post #2 of 23
K2 Axis XR's. 160 CM. An overall good, detuned slalom ski. More difficult in the bumps, but still OK. I used them on my L II exam.
post #3 of 23
I didn't take any exams this year, except PSIA lvl 1. Don't remember what skis I brought, but I remember that it didn't really matter. If you had a pulse and you were able to speak, they gave it to you. The cat didn't get my tongue that day.

I favour my shortie Volkl 6* for all exams and clinics where I have to demo. They are easy to ski on, turns on a dime, great turns of all sizes, and nicely maneuverable through tight eastern ice moguls. Those will certainly be my instrument of choice for my NSPS ski& tobaggan TE recertification next year. And probably ditto when I want to punish myself and possibly try for my PSIA lvl 2. My backup is Atomic SX10, if it happened to be a heavy deep crud day, for which the 6* can be a bit of a dog. Eastern Divisions for both NSPS and PSIA.
post #4 of 23
The more I think about this topic, the more I think Volkl EXP or Rossi B2.
post #5 of 23
Suebrown,
I went to First Tracks and L1, not that there's much pressure here, but it was a good story. My prefered ski was the 9S oversize. I couldn't get back to the mountain before leaving to get my skis because it was near blizzard conditions. So I went out to the shed and pulled out an old pair of Nordica 190's. They have a little shape but they hadn't been used in a few years and had completely rusted edges and dried out bottoms. And off I went to my first meeting with PSIA.

At one point we were doing these very very slooooow parallel turns that would have been hard on 170 9S's. The clinic leader said to me, "are you having a bit of trouble with this?" I just went up next to the leader and matched my skis which dwarfed the 160s and said, "I need just a little more speed." Later, when we were doing some real skiing, I got a "wow your really making some nice turns". To which I said, "thanks, if I had my Rossi's I'd crank some for you."

Just as an aside, near the end of the day, on day two, I got some air off of one of those hucka hucka's and did a face plant as the heels weren't cranked down enough and I over jumped the landing hill by about 20 feet. I cranked down the trail after that to test my senses; everything seemed OK until I came out to the clearing in front of the lodge and I realized that I had no idea where I was.

Hello PSIA glad to meet ya!
post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sir turnalot
Suebrown,
I went to First Tracks and L1, not that there's much pressure here, but it was a good story. My prefered ski was the 9S oversize. I couldn't get back to the mountain before leaving to get my skis because it was near blizzard conditions. So I went out to the shed and pulled out an old pair of Nordica 190's. They have a little shape but they hadn't been used in a few years and had completely rusted edges and dried out bottoms. And off I went to my first meeting with PSIA.
Shoot. What a coincidence. I almost pulled the same stunt, 'cause I didn't really want to go back to my mountain to retrieve my skis. But what I had in the basement was a pair of Volkl p20 RS 207's. I can't imagine doing slooooooow turns with those.
post #7 of 23

tomorrow

I have borrowed a pair of K2 Mach SL race 152's with a 12 meter turning radius for the exam. (and maybe forever)

I have been skiing on Atomic 9-20's in a 170 cm length. the 20 stands for 20 meter turning radius. (more work to carve those short radius slow turns like they throw at you in an exam. It can be done, but how much energy do you have at the end of the day....)

Even thought Im taking the teaching exam in the east tomorrow, I am very glad to have the turny skis for the event and really wish I had them for the skiing part.

Get some slaloms (12-14m turning radius, match the length to suit your body type, etc), then you can match the examiner turn for turn!!!! Hop in right behind him/her whenever you can and match their dynamics. When they go to those super short radius turns of perfection that they always blow you away with, you can stay with them!
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpski
Get some slaloms (12-14m turning radius, match the length to suit your body type, etc), then you can match the examiner turn for turn!!!! Hop in right behind him/her whenever you can and match their dynamics. When they go to those super short radius turns of perfection that they always blow you away with, you can stay with them!
It's just that easy, eh, JP?
post #9 of 23
I used my 175 cm Superspeeds for level 2 part 1. I figured I'd make sure they didn't think it was the ski doing al the work.

I took my 165 cm P60 SCs to the Part 2 because all the examiners and most of the participants were on slaloms at the Part 1.
post #10 of 23
I've come to calling short consumer slalom skis PSIA skis.

I'm not sure who else buys them. I guess some adult racers. The kids all want race stock these days, and none of them are buying 150s (women) or 160s (men)

It would really be difficult to examine skiing with some of the group on short slalom skis, and some of the group on bigger GSey consumer skis.

Would it even be possible to pass the exam on 21m+ skis? How do you demonstrate a modern short turn on such a device? I actually enjoy (sometimes, not all day long, hah) making short turns on my bigger skis, but I wouldn't want to have PSIA judge me on it, cause it would look like 1995.

Its almost like there is some unwritten PSIA rule about skiing on widdle slalom skis. I love widdle slalom skis, and if I taught skiing, thats what I'd use. I just find this intriguing. Or am I wrong? Is there a written rule about using modern equipment with X amount of shape?
post #11 of 23
165 Head XRC i13 w/ Free Flex bindings. Took Level II and passed. The ski was perferct for traversing, short swing, short reaching and edge hold was excellent in long radius turns. It behaved well at slow speeds and was easy to initiate. I love this ski but after two full seasons of teaching on it I may have to replace it. I'm looking for a stiffer short ski.


ed
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman
Would it even be possible to pass the exam on 21m+ skis?
There was a guy (actaually, I think maybe his name was Guy) from Bolton Valley at both parts of my exam. He was skiing on a pair of 198 Dynastar SkiCross 9s and passed both parts, so the answer is yes.
post #13 of 23
I will say that it ain't the arrow its the indian but I would not switch to skis that I had not been regularly skiing and I would not over tune those skis for the exam.
post #14 of 23
I'm wondering if anyone who has recently taken and/or passed their exams would care to comment on what kinds of skis the *examiners* were skiing on.

A related question (and I'm completely ignorant about this subject so please humor me?):

When you do your exams for the various PSIA certification levels, do the examiners demonstrate the various required or expected moves, or do they simply describe or name the drills and then watch and grade the participants?

Bob
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic
There was a guy (actaually, I think maybe his name was Guy) from Bolton Valley at both parts of my exam. He was skiing on a pair of 198 Dynastar SkiCross 9s and passed both parts, so the answer is yes.
That must have been quite interesting.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman
That must have been quite interesting.
He was a damn good skier. A member of F.L.O.A. too.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
I'm wondering if anyone who has recently taken and/or passed their exams would care to comment on what kinds of skis the *examiners* were skiing on.

A related question (and I'm completely ignorant about this subject so please humor me?):

When you do your exams for the various PSIA certification levels, do the examiners demonstrate the various required or expected moves, or do they simply describe or name the drills and then watch and grade the participants?

Bob
I may be wrong, but I thinkthe straightest skis I saw were 6-Stars. There were some Salomon Pilot SCs, Elan something or others, Volkl P60s, I'm a gear geek for sure, but I don't think I was really focused on that at the time. :0

At the skiing part, they tell you what they are going to do and then they demo it. The problem arises if you see something different from what you heard. Then what do you do? What they said, or what they did? At the teaching part, you are demoing the moves. For that reason, I don't name the moves. What if I tell them I'd do pivot slips, and then my idea of a pivot slip is different from thiers?

The bottom line here with regards to skis is that they are lookig for the movements behind your skiing. That's why a guy on 198s can pass the exam when everyone else is on shorties. Whatever the outcome of his turn, they are looking for the underlying moves that make it happen. Only half my class passed, and it wasn't the ski that made them pass or fail.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters
I'm wondering if anyone who has recently taken and/or passed their exams would care to comment on what kinds of skis the *examiners* were skiing on.

A related question (and I'm completely ignorant about this subject so please humor me?):

When you do your exams for the various PSIA certification levels, do the examiners demonstrate the various required or expected moves, or do they simply describe or name the drills and then watch and grade the participants?

Bob
The examiners for my level II teaching exam were on the 2006 Rossi Zenith Z9 and a pair of Stocklis (didn't catch the model, but they were shortish slaloms). Both examiners were women.

I skied on my Fischer RX8s for all of my exams and clinics in the past two years, because I feel like they are a bit less extreme than the Metrons. I passed all of Level I and my Level II skiing last year on the 170s, then my Level II teaching this year on the 165s.

For the skiing maneuvers, yes, at least in PSIA-RM, they are demonstrated by an examiner who will be scoring that maneuver.
post #19 of 23
Although I have a pair of 2006 Rossi Z-9 and Rossi 9S oversize, I prefer to take an exam above the level III on a B-1 bandit becaues it has less shape, less weight and is more all mountain and all terrain than the above mentioned. It is more forgiving in the bumps and softer snow and a very predictable ski in all situations. PS: it is not the gun, but the gunner.
post #20 of 23
I was on Salomon 10.3 Equipe SL Race skis with a Power axe race plate. For my level III.

I didn't have any issues. Even in the off piste segments.

Ski on what you are most comfortable and don't change anything from your practice time.

DC
post #21 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your answers, everyone, and keep 'em coming. They're very interesting. So far it looks like a lot of people prefer the slalom type skis.

And remember, this is a poll, asking what YOUR choice is, not a post asking for advice on what you think others should do. I just want to know what you think is right for you.
post #22 of 23
Ski on what you are most comfortable and don't change anything from your practice time.

DC[/quote]
Good advice!
post #23 of 23
I'd opt for a hexcel or sideral.
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