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Never Skied the East - Am I Missing Out? - Page 5

post #121 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Sorry to burst your bubble, but I can ski one of the 19 ski areas around Lake Tahoe, till mid-day, have plenty of time to clean up, drive to San Franciso Financial District, do the dinner and take in a show at one of the six major professional theaters producing plays from Broadway, off Broadway and London. Or, I could just travel an hour to Amador and El Dorado Wine Country, or 3-hours to Napa. Not my thing, but I don't have to drive to Atlantic City to waste time at casinos. It might be better to skip the ski area and go to Desolation or Mokulomne Wilderness areas or one of the 6 national forests here. A day trip to Yosemite; or maybe visit the Redwoods; or maybe with spring taking hold, go rafting on the American River. We could choose to take in Old Sacramento with great restaurants, the train museum; or ...well you get the idea. California has the good sense to have great snow in the mountains, and a pleasant climate along the coast and inland valleys. So, ski all day, come home and change into shorts, enjoy a glass of wine or beer and BBQ on the deck.

Mr- Zin-wine, of all people, you should know better than to throw down that gauntlet.
If you've ever been to NYC, you would know that SanFran is really no comparison. But we obviously have different tastes/interests--to each his own.
post #122 of 141
Captain,

I am a New Englander who spent several years living in the west. I still ski make it out there about once a season as western skiing is awesome, that I will not deny.

Having said that I say come east old man. Do not come in Janyary because it is colder than Phil's freezer. Do not come when schools are out around mid February. Come in late February or early March. Temps are warmer ( I mean not single digits and below). There is, usually, good snow. But I won't be held responsible for that statement.

IMO Vermont not only has the best skiing here, it also has the most charm in that old New Englandy farm and village way.

Come for at least a week, drive around and sample 3 or 4 different areas. Mad River is less than an hour from Stowe, which is about an hour from Jay Peak.

Is it as good as the west here... Well, let's just say it's different. And as the kids say these days - It's all good.
post #123 of 141
You can experience the thrill of being on an icy rutted race course, without having to register, line up, or wait your turn. They indicate these "courses" with double black diamonds. At first I thought these designations refered to a level of difficulty, but as they are only steep relative to the other runs on the hill, and most don't have any moguls on them and can easily be skied by almost anyone who doesn't mind a bit of speed and has skis that are stable at high speeds (you will only be able to carve LR turns almost straight down the fall line on this hard ice), that can't be it. The occasional exception is that for some strange reason they also have the occasional run with big icy moguls thrown in.

Another advantage is that you can get freshly made sugar pie in Quebec.
post #124 of 141
This has certainly been an interesting thread... but what's a bit troubling is the fact that the question wasn't where is the skiing better, but rather should I take one of my ski trips and go East. The answer should have been a universal yes, because in my book, saying one is a well-rounded skier means being open to try everything. Poo-pooing the conditions in the Northeast is absurd because as I understand it skiing is practiced on mountains with snow on them -- not just downy soft snow that stretches for miles -- but snow that has ice in it, cold windswept summits and dare I say it, narrow 1960's trails with some man made on it. To me, an intermediate skier, the holy grail is to say you have tried it all, not dismissing NE just because its not Jackson Hole, because if it were it would not be New England.

Is the skiing better in the west? I'm sure on many counts yes. But should someone who's skiied for 35 years avoid NE because its cold, icy, sometimes crowded and doesnt have the vertical of say Vail? Of course not, because every trail poses different challenges and provides a different sensory experience, and in the one life we get I think you should try them all and learn from them. Maybe after you go back to the west with a different perspective or you go back west with the attitude that NE skiing isnt worth the trouble. Either way you're a better skiier for it.
post #125 of 141
I've skied West and East and found bad days and good days for both...there isn't always powder out West nor ice in the East. Vail is fabulous and Wilcat in New Hamphshire is glorious...I love being on the snow no matter where I am.
post #126 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverc0il
paying more for 1/3 the mountain, again, i don't know where you are skiing but in the east we have several mountains with 2000+ vertical feet, which is fairly standard from out west from what i've seen. perhaps not as much hiking to OB, but c'mon. ski 2000 verts at cannon, burke, mrg for $50 or less, can't shake a stick at that.

if you're going to give reasons not to ski the east, at least stick to reasons that hold water. there's lots of natural snow skiing in the northeast btw, not all ski trails are man made. it may not be the epic powder of the west, but there's plenty of natural to be had.
When you're done smoking crack, please pass the pipe back over here.

To judge a mountain's terrain solely based on vert is ridiculous.
How fun it must be to ski 2000 vert at a resort with less than 500 acres.
Surely, your arguement holds a crapload of water. :

Only TWO eastern ski resorts boast acreage greater than 757.
Wow...that's something to write off about.
And at a quick glance of the top 20 rated eastern ski resorts,
I eyeball an average of just about 500 acres per mountain.

Now...shall we look at the west?
Care to wager money on the average western having 3 times the 500 acre average of the typical eastern resort that I propose? Actually, the average western resort probably has well over 2000 acres.

But again, if you wish to state that 2000 vert on a rinky-dink mountain is just as good as 2000 vert on a mountain 4 times the size, by all means spread the word.
post #127 of 141
I grew up and learned to ski in the northeast. I moved to the west after college. I moved back a few years later. The plain truth is that western skiing is superior. There is no reason to come east on a ski vacation when you can ski in the west. I enjoy skiing Stowe, Sugerbush, MRG and Jay. But I would rather be skiing Alta, Snowbird, Jackson Hole, Sun Valley, Telluride, Crested Butte, Mammoth, ...etc. Actually there is only one reason to come east. That's if you're going to keep flying over the Atlantic. There are several phenominal ski areas in Europe that are worth the trip.
post #128 of 141
The best run is truly underneath your skis. I'm happy to ski anywhere! So Capt - if you ever plan to ski east, let me know when and where and I will give you a true east coast welcome.

Right now I am home with a sore knee while my friends are tearing up MRG and Sugarbush. Oh well.... next time.

What ever happened to just being happy to be out on the hill?
I've skied the east and west in both the best and worst conditions. Ice, Powder, Rain (complete with designer garbage bag rain gear) you name it. I have not done the southern or midwestern mountains, but if I find myself there I'm going to ski them.

Go out, have fun, learn to be happy wherever you are, step away from the computer. If you can't... put your boots on and think happy thoughts.
post #129 of 141
For what it's worth, Max Capacity took us out for a spin at Okemo today.

It was not crowded. : Saturday? Not crowded? There was the occasional "bus" (groups and gaggles of 8 or more skiers in a clump, Byron's term, love it!!)going by that we'd wait for, but all in all, not a lot of skiers. What the hell is going on?

The snow was almost perfect. : No ice. Some chicken heads. Softened up nicely into an inch of sweet sugar in the sun....shaded areas were still nicely frozen. What the hell is going on??

We skied till we ran out of steam.: Wore us out? Skied only 8-2, but we got the workout. What the hell is going on??

Days like today..........ski the East. No complaints. Days like all of January.....uh......yeah.....
post #130 of 141
It's great when places aren't crowded and you have short lift lines! It is awesome when you get perfect conditions.
I'd say try skiing in the East for fun/travel. Trying new things is always cool. I have never been out West. Some day I hope to go. My Eastern skiing is pretty limited too (WV, PA, MD). You might be a bit disappointed, I dunno. I am sure the places in the East can't hold a candle to CO, etc...unfortunately..
post #131 of 141
Anyone who stayed in front of his or her computer today comparing east vs. west missed the most perfect spring sugar snow ever. I went seven straight hours at Bobcat NY with maybe 40 other people (so much for liftlines)... I would've continued until nightfall if they had kept the t-bars running.
post #132 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin
If you've ever been to NYC, you would know that SanFran is really no comparison. .
You're absolutely right, NYC lacks the pleasant climate, and the proximaty to the National Forests and wine country.

But really Cirquerider, you should have stayed in Ohio, where one can rip up a 300' hill all day and still catch a polka in the Polish section of Cleveland, or stroll down the Cayahoga to Lake Erie.
post #133 of 141
Yes!
post #134 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by riverc0il
you must be skiing at an ASC resort on the weekend, or perhaps loon, to be experiencing 30 minute liftlines. try burke, magic, cannon, wildcat, etc. for 30 second lines. liftlines have less to do with east vs. west and more to do with type of lift setup, number of skiers, and destination resort status.

paying more for 1/3 the mountain, again, i don't know where you are skiing but in the east we have several mountains with 2000+ vertical feet, which is fairly standard from out west from what i've seen. perhaps not as much hiking to OB, but c'mon. ski 2000 verts at cannon, burke, mrg for $50 or less, can't shake a stick at that.

if you're going to give reasons not to ski the east, at least stick to reasons that hold water. there's lots of natural snow skiing in the northeast btw, not all ski trails are man made. it may not be the epic powder of the west, but there's plenty of natural to be had.
You know,

I skied asc places almost all winter (mostly mount snow, but K-mart, too) and two things.

1. I've never waited in a line for 30 minutes(anywhere-not just asc places)...5 minutes tops (including saturday and sunday of this weekend...really nice by the way). Lift management is pretty good at these joints-sometimes the crowd at the base area high speed lifts looks daunting-but they move along pretty impressively!

2. Cost-I bought the ASC all-east bronze pass for $340-13 black out days (Christmas Week, first two days of MLK weekend, First 3 days of presidents week and thanksgiving weekend-however, on those days I was able to ski Haystack). So far, I've skied 18 days at ASC places-that's $18.80 a day (and I'll go a few more times!). Also, I've gotten a few discounts on the mountain with the pass. All in all, that's way cheap! I also have a Sugarcard for sugarbush...Sunday through Friday is $39 to ski (fifty something on Saturday).

Alta and Salt Lake city is a Bargain (and I hit it every year)...but I also skied Summit county this year, right around the time I forked over $16 to park and walked 1/3 cobblestone mile to buy my $77 lift ticket I realized not every where out west is Alta, afterall.
post #135 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam
...but I also skied Summit county this year, right around the time I forked over $16 to park and walked 1/3 cobblestone mile to buy my $77 lift ticket I realized not every where out west is Alta, afterall.
Close, but no cigar. This would be in Eagle County, and you could of jumped on the shuttle right outside the garage and headed over to Golden Peak and walked 50 yards instead.

For future reference, there is a cheaper lot in the West end of the village.

Being that we are on the east vs west thing here. My Vail Resorts Pass was $ 329.00, Unlimited at Breckenridge/Keystone/A-Basin and I get 10 days at Vail and Beaver Creek with the same blackout (only Vail and BC) that you mentioned in your post.

That deal vs the ASC pass----I'll gladly pay for parking to ski Vail, but the place I usually stay most always lets me use their lot for free even when I'm not staying there .
post #136 of 141
Tell 'em Luigi sent you.
post #137 of 141
West is best and East is least. I wouldn't trade any of my days at MRG for anything, but if I had a choice of East vs. west, no contest. Any yes, I have seen THAT yeti in the woods at MRG.
post #138 of 141
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for the insightful comments and warm welcomes to easter slopes. It's in the plan for next year.

We won't substitute a western ski trip, but will tack the trip onto a business or family visit, as suggested (I'm not a complete romantic, or immune to the cautions many of you offered).

I realize eastern skiing will be different, and challenging for us western wussies.

We just returned from Tahoe which offered it's own array of challenges (80 mph winds, fog, and wet with 6 to 7 feet of sierra snow in 5 days). It was still a hoot!

I'd likely need to sharpen my technique and skis for eastern turns. However, I've no doubt I'd savor the experience, with all its differences.
post #139 of 141
Awesome! Let us know when you're here...

We could probably serve up some high winds while you're here...but that's why we have trees...

Thatsagirl
post #140 of 141
Should you ski in the East? While I wouldn't argue with most posts so far, I'd offer this perspective as well:

I am a westerner, born and raised, who spent a good part of 10 winters in New England from about age 15 to 24. I believe that Eastern skiing taught me a huge amount about skiing in more difficult terrain (both ice and narrow trails) than one is forced to ski in the West. While I had some great days there, the best part was coming back west each Christmas and laughing out loud about how easy everything here had suddenly become. I have now skied another 20 years in the West since then and still find it sweeter for the experience. Also, it is worth skiing in the east because New England mountains are truly beautiful in a quaint, rolling foothill sort of way. If you go east, do it during a non-holiday week (warning: they take a February vacation out there that most Westerners do not). And enjoy the scenery and some skiing that'll wake you up big time. Then, you'll savor the memories for a lifetime while you find sweeter than you can ever remember every turn out west till the end of days.
post #141 of 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrzinwin
For all the east-coast trashing that has been going on, I have personally found a few redeeming qualities. One is skiing on ice--while most people would find this to be less than appealing, carving on a fast surface like hardpack or ice at high speed is far more exhilirating than a more mundane surface such as packed powder.

The second quality is the trees. New England tree skiing often involves taking a very narrow path (shoulder length) in the woods. There is something uniquely adventurous and peaceful about stopping to find yourself completely surrounded by trees.

Additionally, dodging people while screaming down the hill is a uniquely east-coast phenomenon and I find that it makes skiing a lot more interesting and fun when you have obstacles to avoid while screaming down the hill at breakneck speeds.

Finally, I have found that the lifts on the east coast tend to be of a higher quality (stratton has 4 high speed sixes).
I agree with everything mentioned. If I'm using my race skis, I honestly prefer very hard snow/borderline ice for precision carving. Soft snow deadens the razor-edge responsiveness of race boards. For westerners, the east is definitely worth a trip, but you had better ski like a racer (high angulated carving). If you can carve, the east is great, but if you like to skid around in powder, you're going to be miserable.

Using beginners as slalom poles is great fun too lol.

People who bash the east and whine about ice should learn how to ski the right way and learn to enjoy any type of snow, wherever it can be had; that's truly a love of skiing.
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