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PLEASE READ ITS IMPORTANT thanks so much! - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
99% you won´t make it to the top.
But you'll never know if you don't try.

All good advice here so far. Go for it girl!
post #32 of 51
Go for it!
You only live once.



Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIER16
i am a 16 year old female skier
i have been skiing since the age of 7 or so
i can carve, do moguls pretty well, ski steep terrain, and mostly all conditions (ice can be a nerveracker sometimes though... hehe)

when i ski down the lift line, my dad says people watch me and turn around on the chairlift as i pass them...

my question is:
CAN I START RACING NEXT YEAR? IS IT TOO LATE FOR ME TO BEGIN AT THIS AGE? i would be 16 turning 17 next season

I REALLY WOULD APPRECIATE ALL YOUR OPINIONS!
thank you again!!
post #33 of 51
I started racing seriously (Uni level) when I was 18 years old. Of course I already was an instructor (Can Level II), a ski coach (FESC Level I) and already had gate experience in weekend leagues and such, but even then, I was caught unprepared for what lied ahead of me: fun, fun, fun and work. It's never too late to start racing, maybe it's too late to start racing college or pro, at least on alpine team (I don't know about freestyle or skiercross) but you'll still feel, learn and do things that wouldn't be possible otherwise.

I know guys who started racing masters at 60 years old, tired of the old up and down. Sure they don't rip up the course, but they are very capable skiers, both technicaly and mentaly, and that is all that matters.
post #34 of 51
Never too old to start. No matter what, it will help improve your skiing.
post #35 of 51
Wow. I never would have guessed this would get so many responses. Everyone seems to be in agreement. ..... OK, just for fun, I'll take the other side.

Nah, don't do it. Sit at home and play video games. Sports are overrated.
post #36 of 51
As a x race parent I wish you good luck VY is a tough place to make it to the top. Lots of great talent in NE. My son came through Okemo's program. A friends daughter did the same and now is at Burke. She just did well at Nationals and is headed for Mammoth in a couple of weeks. The best are headed for Norway. It a lot of travel if you make it the the upper level.

The somethings you can count on; you well learn skills you will have for the rest of your life. You will meet other kids who will become friends for life.

We have two friend who did the same thing your doing, started racing as a J2. One now teaches skiing while she is going to UVM. The other, this was her first year. I'll ask her how she liked it when I'm bringing her home Sunday night. She seems to be very happy with her progress.



Keep us posted.
post #37 of 51
Yes she is have a wonderful time. One tip is to make sure the coaches know who you are and make sure they keep you updated on all the race and training dates. The coaches seem to only tell the (in our case) OMS kids the times, dates, of all the races. Not to mention when the van leaves and what time to be there. I'm sure it is the same with most programs. Having been a race parent I have a good idea of what I'm saying.
post #38 of 51
Skier16 - my sister told me to tell you to go for it. She's 41 and is trying new stuff all the time!
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIER16
i am a VERY determined person... yes i would like to race in college and even go pro, honestly, i think i could do it... i ski everyday after school, i just need a coach and i think ill b set

didnt u guys hear about that guy who started racing in college and than won a gold or something?

ANY PEOPLE THINK I SHOULD JUST NOT START??? would it be a waste of money?

thanks
Even if you do not become a great racer you would benefit from racing. It will improve your level of skiing and give you more confidence.

Most of the elite racers start at an earlier age...but who knows, maybe you will be the exception. Of course, a lot of those kids burn out by your age and retire from serious racing.

I have always recommended racing for almost any level of skier and age as a way to improve your skiing. Racing will reveal your technical errors not evident in your free sking very quickly. And racing is fun. If you ever get to an elite level, racing is a big commitment and requires lots of effort, time, and money.

Suggest you try it for a season and see how you like it. Go into it with an open mind and don't expect too much in the way of results and you will do well and have fun.

BTW, I am a former teacher and racing coach and all of my "boys" (now 38-42) raced. We have already started the next gen but so far only 1 is sort of serious about it. He is only 10 so he has lots of time. But his skiing has taken a quantum leap since he began just recreational race clinics. Now he wants to see what he can do in more serious formats like USSA. Unfortunately, we do not have any school sponsered racing in our area.

Go for it and good luck.
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheskis
But you'll never know if you don't try.

All good advice here so far. Go for it girl!
You are right.

Also, it is the journey not the destination that matters.
post #41 of 51
I haven't read the obvious answer yet:

If you're doing it with the hope of success and fame someday, you're doing it for the wrong reason- you don't race becasue there's a chance you could make the WC and win medals, becasue you're going to be sorely disappointed. As far as the age thing goes, take a look at the applications for NCAA ski programs- they ask for all sorts of recommendations, and there's a spot for your FIS points. There's no way you'll be earning ANY points before college if you're just starting at 16. Not to be negative, but its the sad truth.

OTOH, if you're doing it becasue you want to race and compete on the high school team and in college leagues, go for it, becasue I know that I have way more fun when I'm race training than just ripping down groomers. I met my best friends through race programs, and its improved my skiing immensely- in the two freestyle clinics I took this year, I heard from both clinicians "You look like a racer on a pair of twin tips. lighten up a bit." :-D Once a racer, always a racer!

in short: do it becasue its something fun and different, not because it'll provide for you someday.
post #42 of 51
Thread Starter 
and why wont i be earning any points before college???

its funny bc every time i go skiing at least 2 people ask me if im a racer
yesterday i went to killington and late in the day it was pretty empty, this siick guy who was skiing the moguls asked me if i was a racer and i said no, he replied by saying, get urself into racing right now bc u have amazing carving/skiing technique

so what do u say to thaaat huh
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIER16
and why wont i be earning any points before college???

its funny bc every time i go skiing at least 2 people ask me if im a racer
yesterday i went to killington and late in the day it was pretty empty, this siick guy who was skiing the moguls asked me if i was a racer and i said no, he replied by saying, get urself into racing right now bc u have amazing carving/skiing technique

so what do u say to thaaat huh
Anything is possible. It is very difficult to start at 16 and get your points low (low is better) enough to get on the radar screen.

Ski racing is a long process of learning...improving your technical skiiing, learning to race each discipline, gaining experience for different course settings and conditions, learning race strategy, waxing, etc.

When you start out you will be seeded last and will get the worst course conditions....ruts, chatter marks, etc....so no matter how talented you are the more difficult it is to get a good result. Most racers have to work their way up the ladder to get better starting times and a realistic chance to finish well...or even win. In my coaching days I have seen some kids burst on the scene but that is the exception.

In an earlier post I suggested that you should not set your expectations too high. Set realistic goals and you won't get discouraged. Notch them ever higher as you progress. Courses can be absolute hell for later racers when there are 80 or more racers who have chewed up the course ahead of you. Sometimes just finishing a rutted course can be equivalent to winning for a late starter. The point is that most racers work their way up the ladder and get improving course conditions while also gaining valuable experience. Some of the kids have been racing 5 or 6 years by 16.

This is not to discourage you at all...just to set your expectations. Racing is fun and few actually win races but every racer benefits with the fun, camaraderie, and improved skiing. Those skills will stay with you for your entire life.

Sounds like you really want to do it so go for it. And who knows, maybe you will be the exception to the rule.
post #44 of 51
Thread Starter 
maybe i will

ill keep u guys posted if u want
post #45 of 51
Don't let anyone tell you what's possible and what's not.

I remember doing Karate with a guy who was making small change as an automechanic. He had done some Tae Kwon Do before and was just picking it up again. He was interested in homeopathic medicine, and thinking maybe going to a college that taught that. He became very serious about the martial arts, and went to Japan to study it. He came back and set up a dojo. He went on, not to a homeopathic college, but to an offshore medical school. The last I heard he was head of Pediatrics at a hospital in the U.S.A.

The odds are you will not be the next WC champion, but you've got to reach out for the possible, and not say "It ain't gona happen so why try?" If you don't make it, so what? You will have gone much farther and have a one fewer regret on your death bed.
post #46 of 51
The racing experience collected over years from the age of 6 or so is invaluable.

Otoh, the points collected before entering the "adult" racing at 15/16 are practically nothing for all but a few best first-year juniors who get the right to participate in FIS races for each country without any points.
The 99% rest has to fight again from the beginning as late starters.

Whether SKIER16 had or had not good (or no) points in the past plays little role. Other factors - I don´t aspire to presenting a list, also because there are some experienced coaches here - do.
post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIER16
maybe i will

ill keep u guys posted if u want
Of course we want you to keep us posted, but not just on how well you do. We want to know if the whole experience is good. So, please, let us know what happens next season. We will be waiting to hear from you!! LewBob
post #48 of 51
Thread Starter 
checkracer.... so are u saying that i have just a good a chance as all 99% that even have been racing since a young age?
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIER16
checkracer.... so are u saying that i have just a good a chance as all 99% that even have been racing since a young age?
Can't speak for checkracer but you are starting late and the kids that have been racing and training for several years do have an advantage. However, we all mature and develop at different times. Some young athletes peak early and others don't develop physically and/emotionally until much later. Sports like ski racing and tennis tend to eliminate those late bloomers due to the way the sports are organized.

Other sports give late bloomers a better chance. One of the best golfers ever was Ben Hogan who did not start to win until his 30s and that was after a horrific auto accident. He went on to become one of the all time greats. Michael Jordan could not make his high school team but became the greatest basketball player ever. There is no way to predict how an individual will progress but that does not mean that success is not possible for a late bloomer just more difficult. The effort itself has a value for you regardless of the outcome.

I commented earlier that you should set attainable goals and keep raising them as you achieve each one. If you expect to burst upon the racing scene and blow every experienced racer off the course, you will probably be frustrated. You will also see some racers at your age burned out and retire from racing.

Go for it and keep us posted. Everyone likes a success story....just give yourself credit for all your incremental successes....winning a race and getting low points is just a product of all those small successes.
post #50 of 51
There is a bias in youth sports that gives those who participate in advanced training at an early age a significant advantage. To the extent that they succeed they then get the attention of coaches and elevation to better teams, and the gap between them and those who come to advanced training late widens. This is not invariable, as there is attrition due to changing interests, changes in body habitus, etc but the fact remains that it is unusual for late bloomers to succeed at the highest level, Michael Jordan notwithstanding. The irony is of course that those kids who start very early actually have little input into the decision; it is made for them by their parents. Waiting for a child to come to the conclusion on their own (as you have) that they are wiling and eager to commit to advanced training may preclude their success.

However, succeeding at the highest level (competitively) should not be the sole motivation. Rather, it should be whether you will enjoy the experience and benefit from it, whatever the outcome of the order of finishing.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by checkracer
...the points collected before entering the "adult" racing at 15/16 are practically nothing for all but a few best first-year juniors who get the right to participate in FIS races for each country without any points.
The 99% rest has to fight again from the beginning as late starters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIER16
checkracer.... so are u saying that i have just a good a chance as all 99% that even have been racing since a young age?
You've got a winner's attitude, SKIER16! You should start your own blog to keep us updated. You're an inspiration.
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