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Skiing Without a Donor Card??

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Okay, we've talked about skiing drunk or high, we've talked about skiing without helmets, we've even talked about skiing without health insurance, so the next logical jump here is...

Do you ski without a "Living Will"? Also called an "Advance Directive". How about a Donor Card?

I'm not really kidding here.

In the event that your next powder day ends with your forehead meeting treebark in a rapid decceleration, does your family know what your wishes are? Do they ALL know, or would there be disagreement about what you would want? Is is in black and white so that your Trauma Team and neurologist knows?

If your Gray matter is left on the mountain, will anyone get your leftover parts?

The reason this occurs to me is that I was recently informed that one of my Cystic Fibrosis patients from last week was wisked away to receive his "new" lungs. Fortunately but tragically the lungs came from a 17 year old who was brain dead from a traffic accident.

Since we are all aware of the potential for untimely injuries - whether on the ski hill or off - I just thought I'd bring this up.
post #2 of 21
honestly never even thought about it...
always made sure my health insurance was good though.
post #3 of 21
come to think of it my driver's license, which I always ski with (in case I need to be identified), has that I am an organ donor on it.
post #4 of 21
Really not a skiing related discussion IMO. For most of us skiing is a minor risk enhancement. The real danger is getting to the hill and avoiding falls in the bathroom. Either you have dealt with this at the time you signed your driver's license, or establish a living will. I have not signed, but the reasons may not be what you think.
post #5 of 21
Never considered it. But I'm not a donor anyway. I may need that stuff in the afterlife, I'm not really down with givin' it up.
post #6 of 21
See...following Pierre will make you think of things that should never cross your mind while sliding down the hill.

Bad thoughts create bad movements...that create accidents. Go blank, huck it and live another day Thinking about the negative what if's will only get you in trouble...even on easier terrain IMO.
post #7 of 21
Always. I never considered it a skiing accesory but I always carry the card. As far as I'm concerned anyone who needs the leftovers is welcome to them.
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by xdog1
Never considered it. But I'm not a donor anyway. I may need that stuff in the afterlife, I'm not really down with givin' it up.
reminds me of one of my favorite lines from Woody Allen:
"I am not sure that I believe in an afterlife, but just in case I am bringing along a change of underwear."

(yes, I carry a donor card. I am on the liver transplant team at Children's Hospital in Denver, and I had an aunt who lived an extra 14 years thanks to a transplanted liver. It enabled her to see all 3 of her kids grow up and get married, and see her grandchildren.)
post #9 of 21
Interesting. I was always opposed to being a donor. But since I just became a "recipient," I may need to rethink that.
post #10 of 21

It's not enough to declare on your license.

Contrary to popular belief, just declaring that you want to be an organ donor on your drivers license isn't enough to ensure that any viable organs are donated. You have to make your wishes clear to your family. Someone very close to me is alive today because an annonomous family in a time of great grief and tragedy gave the gift of life. To anyone who is skiddish about giving up your organs after your dead, don't be. You won't need them anymore but your organs can mean new life to someone who may need a heart, a liver, a kidney, pancrease or lungs.

I met Chris Klug two years ago at a fundraiser in Seattle. Anyone who knows his story can't help but think that organ donation is a good thing. I'm so glad he and many other transplant recipients are giving back for an amazing act. Every day approximately 17 people die because they could not get an organ transplant.

Every time I go skiing with that special someone, I can't help but think the reason I'm skiing with them is because someone donated an organ.
post #11 of 21
Hi LM- how was the surgery?
Toadman is correct. The declaration on your license helps make your wishes known, but without either an advance directive or the consent of your heirs you cannot actually become a donor. I heard an excellent lecture last year from one of the leading experts in Jewish medical ethics, Moshe Tendler (who was also one of my professors in college). He believes that ethically, at least from the standpoint of Jewish law, there is an IMPERATIVE, not an option, to be an organ donor. There is really a crisis worldwide of a shortage of organs for transplant (I had a patient die a few weeks ago waiting for a liver) that should make everyone think about doing this.
post #12 of 21
post #13 of 21
I'm a melanoma survivor, they don't want mine.

Everybody cover up, ya' hear?
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
Really not a skiing related discussion IMO. For most of us skiing is a minor risk enhancement. The real danger is getting to the hill and avoiding falls in the bathroom. Either you have dealt with this at the time you signed your driver's license, or establish a living will. I have not signed, but the reasons may not be what you think.
I basically agree with you, Cirque, though I hand it to DrFrau for making an effort here. The fact is, the drive to the ski area is hundreds of times more dangerous. There's a Scottish bloke who has one of the best websites I've seen on this topic, though the data is Scotland-specific. www.ski-injury.com/home1.htm The total number of skiing fatalities in the US is statistically tiny. So organ donation related to skiing may be a real issue theoretically, but it's statistically on par with drowning while taking a bath or dying from a chipmunk attack. It could happen!
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj
I'm a melanoma survivor, they don't want mine.

Everybody cover up, ya' hear?
That is the reason for me as well. In fact I was instructed not to donate blood either. Ahh sun!

Wbron, could sun exposure at high altitude be construed a greater hazard than trees or collisions?
post #16 of 21
My "take everything" donor card is always in my wallet.

Our family (me, wife, 2 kids) have all made it very, very clear to all our relatives that everything is available.

Just this weekend I was talking with my brother-in-law and he is an anti-dodnor...one of those strange conversations where I really fail to understand his reasons, they just seem so bizarre that he wants to be burried whole when he could save the lives of others.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
That is the reason for me as well. In fact I was instructed not to donate blood either. Ahh sun!

Wbron, could sun exposure at high altitude be construed a greater hazard than trees or collisions?
Considering that melanoma deaths are in the several thousands every year -- compared to a few dozen skiing -- your and Viking's important stories certainly makes a big impression on me.
post #18 of 21
Until very recently the arrangement in the Czech Republic was: if you didn´t exclude yourself as a donor you were automatically considered one.
After a discussion and criticism (your body belongs to you, not to the state) there was/should be a change but I´m not quite sure how far the process is.
Time to think about it. Sure it´s good to be useful "after".
post #19 of 21
This topic is a total DOWNER. Leave it at the hospital. Please.
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterslovo
come to think of it my driver's license, which I always ski with (in case I need to be identified), has that I am an organ donor on it.
On my license too. We donated heart valves and kidneys from our daughter when she passed. It is good to know part of her is still around.
post #21 of 21
DrFrau,

Happy to state that on this occasion I am in complete agreement with you having carried an organ donor card for as long as I remember.

Besides, like any true Scotsman I work on the basis the more they remove, the less there is to burn so there should be a discount at the crematorium
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