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Surefoot Boots = $$$

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 
I visited the Surefoot store in Manhattan this past Sunday and ended up spending a rediculous amount of money.

For the past 5 or so seasons I have been skiing with Lange GX9 boots. You know, the bright orange ones. Anyway, skiing one day with them has never been a problem. Only after skiing about 4 days in a row will they start to really hurt my feet. This year, I skied one day, and it was almost unbearable without taking a couple of advils.

With a trip to Stratton in a couple of weeks, and a trip booked to Snowbird next year, I decided to get some new boots.

I had planned on going all out and getting every customizing option available. I just didnt realize it would be so damn expensive. I would have at least saved a couple hundred bucks if i would have bought the boots at Princeton and then brought the shell to Surefoot. Anyway, thats all in the past.

First, they mapped the bottom of my feet to make the footbeds. This took about 15 minutes. It then took about 45 minutes to make the footbeds.

Next we measured for the correct shell size. I decided on Lange Comp 120 FR boots.

Then came the foam injection process. After sticking on pads to 3 different locations on my feet, and then slipping this foam cover over my toes, I finally stuck my feet in the boots. This was tight and a little uncomfortable because of the padding. The foam being injected into the boots was a strange sensation. Also, it was very uncomfortable, if not painful. After about 20 minutes later, I was able to slip out of the boots. Afterwards that night, the tops of my feet were all bruised up from being constricted so damn tight.
After making a couple minor adjustments to the liner, the boots fit perfectly. They are very snug and wrap my feet like a vice. I tried them on last night for about a half hour so my feet can adjust a little. They hurt the tops of my feet (where they are bruised up) which can be expected. Other than that, I have no complaints. However, the true test will be when I go skiing. Hopefully they will be just fine.
post #2 of 42

Boys are wimps! ;)

Vin,

My close friend did the exact same process and got the custom lange boot, also. I had always heard from guys that getting "foamed" is painful. She said that while there was some mild discomfort (more the pulling UP then the tightness in the boot), that the process was pretty harmless.

She loves her new boots and is 100 percent happy with them.

kiersten
post #3 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by klkaye
Vin,

My close friend did the exact same process and got the custom lange boot, also. I had always heard from guys that getting "foamed" is painful. She said that while there was some mild discomfort (more the pulling UP then the tightness in the boot), that the process was pretty harmless.

She loves her new boots and is 100 percent happy with them.

kiersten
I guess it depends..............the tops of both of my feet are pretty banged up.......kinda a light purple color.........so yeah I would say it was pretty uncomfortable.......borderline painful.

I hope I am 100 % happy with them as well.....I guess we'll find out when I go skiing......
post #4 of 42
How many have foamed their Surefoot boots and then taken them to altitude?
post #5 of 42
I had mine done in Summit County--skied on 'em all that day and the next, just purple big toe nails resulted, but no other problems. Skied at 'non-altitude' since and still doin' great!
post #6 of 42
Soooo, How much did it run you? I am also in NY and was planning to get my boots at Stratton's Green Mtn orthotics or at Stowe, but may check out surefoot.
post #7 of 42
I had the Lange FR 120 foamed with a Conformable liner and a Surefoot footbed at Squaw. Total was about $1150 !!!!

Skiied on em for 3 or 4 days, and it was really quite painful to break them in. Took them back to the store for a few liner adjustments and to blow out the 6th toe area in the right boot. After about 6 days, they are now PERFECT. I skiied them on a cat trip in Steamboat and for another week at Vail and all is good. I would do it again. They are very comfortable and snug at the same time. However, I have ZERO doubt that an expert boot fitter could achieve the same result for less money. And there probably wouldnt have to have been so many return trips to the store for adjustments. Nice thing about Surefoot though is that they are at every major resort and they have a lifetime money back guarantee. I like the security of knowing if they ever start giving me trouble, I am at their doorstep. Mine are a Lange - Surefoot OEM boot shell so they say Surefoot on the side of the boot -- no mistake where they were bought when I walk in the store.


By the way, unless you are a super expert or a racer or just for some inexplicable reason like stiff non flexing boots, take the two screws out in the back, and replace the Lange strap with a Booster Strap. Both changes will provide lots of nice even flex.

Mike
post #8 of 42
I had mine done at Surefoot also (Killington). Same price tag (got the Booster Strap also).

The first few days (5 or so) on them were ultra painful. I am talking couple of hours of skiing and have to stop due to the pain. However, now they are perfect and are so comfortable.

I am a very happy customer and have no second thoughts about doing Surefoot.. but be ready for the few real painful ski days.
post #9 of 42
I had mine foamed at Mammoth. When the boots are cold, they are a little difficult to remove. I had one hot spot that was fixed and have been very happy. I used to always get sore spots on my shins but because they foam the tongue that is never a problem.
post #10 of 42

Guess I'm lucky...

I didn't find foaming necessary on my Langes. Wow you guys spent a lot! I bought 03-04 Lange 120 FRs used (like 1-2 days) for $175 on epicski, & they were in good shape (a punch out near the ankle bone).

I went to Granite Chief at Squaw & (for free; I tipped the tech) they: heated the shell back to its original shape, put in a couple of "Cs" on the ankles to tighten the heel pocket, pushed out the 6th toe on 1 boot. When I came back, they redid the 6th toe & made it better. Again, no charge.

The boots are comfy and I like them a lot; I weigh 170 and don't find them too stiff.
post #11 of 42
Thread Starter 
Well the only skiing I am going to be doing this year are 3 days at Stratton. I'll bring along a bottle of advil in case they hurt a lot.

One question though. Does the boot change after a few days of skiing? Or do your feet get used to the new boot? Or a little of both maybe.

I guess I am just really scared that I am going to get up to the mountain with these new rediculously expensive boots and be in pain. For this much money, they should feel like slippers...........
post #12 of 42
Its not that you get used to the pain. The lining packs out a little bit after a few days, thats all.

For that much dough, they should come with a hot young ski instructor.
post #13 of 42

Squeamish towards things all nasty tight and clampy

Quote:
Originally Posted by vindog
... After making a couple minor adjustments to the liner, the boots fit perfectly. ... They hurt the tops of my feet (where they are bruised up) which can be expected. Other than that, I have no complaints.
Foam liners will break in and eventually break down just like any other liner.

Are you wearing them around to break them in and pinpoint any trouble spots to minimize down time if you have issues while you’re at Stratton (or wherever they are)?

I don’t understand how the tops of your feet get bruised from foaming (too hot, too much pressure, you’re a mutant, etc.), but for $1150 plan on visiting them.
post #14 of 42

See Greg Hoffman at Green Mtn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fitn217
Soooo, How much did it run you? I am also in NY and was planning to get my boots at Stratton's Green Mtn orthotics or at Stowe, but may check out surefoot.
See Greg Hoffman at Green Mtn. He teachs at the Master Boot Fitter academy and is the best in the area to fit your boot. Furthermore, his shop is right next to the lifts on Stratton Mountain, not in the City.
By selecting a boot fitter who is located on a mountain that you ski; you can immediately observe the results of adjustments made to the boots and make further changes. The whole fitting process is accelerated dramatically. Also fitters can observe your foot as it comes out of the boot. They can see the hot spots. An immediate fit can be made while you are on the mountain and skiing; as opposed to coming home after a weekend, and waiting until next weekend to test the results of a fix.
post #15 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodee
Foam liners will break in and eventually break down just like any other liner.

Are you wearing them around to break them in and pinpoint any trouble spots to minimize down time if you have issues while you’re at Stratton (or wherever they are)?

I don’t understand how the tops of your feet get bruised from foaming (too hot, too much pressure, you’re a mutant, etc.), but for $1150 plan on visiting them.
I had them on the other night, and they were bothering me around the tops of my feet where they are bruised. I have never done the foaming before so I had no idea what to expect. The foam wasnt too hot, there was just alot of pressure. They slip that foam pad over your toes, so it was extremely tight even before foaming.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gordopost
See Greg Hoffman at Green Mtn. He teachs at the Master Boot Fitter academy and is the best in the area to fit your boot. Furthermore, his shop is right next to the lifts on Stratton Mountain, not in the City.
By selecting a boot fitter who is located on a mountain that you ski; you can immediately observe the results of adjustments made to the boots and make further changes. The whole fitting process is accelerated dramatically. Also fitters can observe your foot as it comes out of the boot. They can see the hot spots. An immediate fit can be made while you are on the mountain and skiing; as opposed to coming home after a weekend, and waiting until next weekend to test the results of a fix.
I'll be skiing at Stratton April 1-3. I'll be in the ski shop because I want to demo some skis. If the boots are bothering me the first day, I will defenitely have him take a look. And if its just a matter of time before my feet settle into them, then fine, I can live with that.
post #16 of 42
I got my boots from the Surefoot in Manhattan before a trip to Whistler. No foam liner, though. The plan was to get the boots, wear them around the house to break them in a bit, and tend to any fitting issues from skiing at the store in Whistler. Worked out really well... but was still a painful first couple of days before working out all the kinks. Very happy with the boots and Surefoot's service.

Not sure if Stratton or Snowbird has a Surefoot... but the break in period could be pretty painful for you. Might want to consider bringing your trusty old pair of boots to Stratton.

Are you bruising around the ankle, instep of over the forefoot?
post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by fitn217
Soooo, How much did it run you? I am also in NY and was planning to get my boots at Stratton's Green Mtn orthotics or at Stowe, but may check out surefoot.
Go to GMOLfoot. No comparison.
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by vindog
I guess it depends..............the tops of both of my feet are pretty banged up.......kinda a light purple color.........so yeah I would say it was pretty uncomfortable.......borderline painful.

I hope I am 100 % happy with them as well.....I guess we'll find out when I go skiing......
I hope you're happy with them, too. All the top-end bootfitters I've worked with over the years would not do this, though. Frankly, this concerns me. There is no reason for your boots to be painful during the fitting process or while you're "breaking them in".

If you're reading this and you haven't done this, yet, I'd recommend a top bootfitter (like Green Mountain in New England; Jeff Bergeron, Jim Lindsay, or Bob Gleason here in Colorado; Bud Heishman in Reno) and taking their specific recommendations. In my case, I'm in a pair of only slightly modified Tecnica XTs that Jeff recommended (together with three other boots) last fall. If the shell fits properly, foam is usually no longer required.
post #19 of 42
Bob Gleason's shop in Teluride is simply terrific.
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikezuk
By the way, unless you are a super expert or a racer or just for some inexplicable reason like stiff non flexing boots, take the two screws out in the back,
Mike
Itd be a much better plan to buy an appropriate boot in the first place, save some cash, and still have good rebound. Unlocking the cuff like that is pretty awful for the way the boot skis.
post #21 of 42
Excuse my ignorance but does this $1150 include the boots or just the foaming?

I need to have my boots fitted (not foamed) but I was hoping for less than $100...or to put it another way, I was going to ask them to do what they can for that amount (or less). Am I looking to be disappointed? (My problem is swishy heels - probably a common one.)
post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh
Go to GMOLfoot. No comparison.
No offense, but, you live in Boulder, how would you know?
post #23 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinceramic
I got my boots from the Surefoot in Manhattan before a trip to Whistler. No foam liner, though. The plan was to get the boots, wear them around the house to break them in a bit, and tend to any fitting issues from skiing at the store in Whistler. Worked out really well... but was still a painful first couple of days before working out all the kinks. Very happy with the boots and Surefoot's service.

Not sure if Stratton or Snowbird has a Surefoot... but the break in period could be pretty painful for you. Might want to consider bringing your trusty old pair of boots to Stratton.

Are you bruising around the ankle, instep of over the forefoot?
The bruising occurred during the foaming process on the tops of my feet maybe 2 inches above the toes. When I try them on now, I feel some pressure in that area, most likely because they are still a little bruised. The boots fit perfectly and I have no pressure points. Once my foot heals 100%, then I dont think that this will be a larger issue than just unbuckling the bottom buckles on the lift. Thats no big deal. The boot is just generally very very snug. Maybe my feet are just not used to this feeling. I'll keep wearing them in my house. Hopefully my feet will adjust to being wrapped this tightly.
post #24 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSchool
Excuse my ignorance but does this $1150 include the boots or just the foaming?

I need to have my boots fitted (not foamed) but I was hoping for less than $100...or to put it another way, I was going to ask them to do what they can for that amount (or less). Am I looking to be disappointed? (My problem is swishy heels - probably a common one.)
The 1150 includes the footbed, shell and the foam liner. I think it was
505 = shell
395 = Liner
195 = Footbed
post #25 of 42
I am not surprised that your foot or leg became bruised. Great pressure results in the boot when the two foam agents are mixed. Your foot being in the boot experiences this extreme pressure. It is really very intense. However, after the catalytic foam agents setup, they cool, and the liner contracts, making it more comfortable.

Furthermore, like a regular liner, the foam is compressed as you ski. This takes anywhere from 5-10 ski days depending on how hard you ski.

Foam liners are a little denser and harder than production liners. They are also have a little less insulating value than regular boot liners. All things being equal; foamed boots are probably going to less warm. However, usually the fit of a foamed boot is so much better the boot does not need to be over tightened. Too-tight boots cut off circulation. The biggest cause of cold feet is overtightening boots, causing the shell to distort; which pinches off blood vessels and circulation.

Finally foam liners will degrade. They do not last as long as production liners. I had a foam liner that I pulled in and out of a boot a couple of hundred times either skiing and/or trying to tweak the fit. At points on the liner that where being distorted or folded during removal, the foam was beginning to show signs of becoming powdery and breaking up. This of course, was an extreme example. Gordo
post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingman
Itd be a much better plan to buy an appropriate boot in the first place, save some cash, and still have good rebound. Unlocking the cuff like that is pretty awful for the way the boot skis.
Dang! And I thought they were working out pretty well for me...

Seriously, can you be more specific? How is it pretty awful for the way the boot skis? I was understanding that they were made to be removed and in fact a lot of folks on this very forum have done it.
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic
No offense, but, you live in Boulder, how would you know?
So, do you disagree? Edit: I just realized that you may have read it that Green Mountain was no comparison to Stowe. That was not my intent! My intent was to compare it to Surefoot in Manhattan. :End edit.

I haven't always lived here in Boulder. In fact, I lived in Kingston, NY for a while... But, that's neither here nor there...

We have Surefoot out here. I've been there. I won't go back.

I've read GMOLfoot's posts here. Clearly, he knows what he's doing. I'm not saying that he's the only guy in the East, but I am saying that going to Green Mountain is way better than Surefoot--no comparison. The rest of this thread is re-enforcing that for me. I've been foamed. What I'm reading here is crazy!

If there's someone that you'd recommend, please do. I wasn't saying Green Mountain is the only place to go!
post #28 of 42
A positive vote for Surefoot in Manhattan. I bought my Head Freerider Lady boots there 2 years ago and had footbeds made there, too. (But no foam.)

Staff was superb and patient and spent at least 2 1/2 hours with me, haviing me try on every single woman's boot they had to find the best fit. Where in the world in Manhattan can you find a salesperson to devote that much time to you? (The secret is to go on a rainy day, when nobody is in the store).

They also said if I had any problems to bring the boots back and they'll adjust them until I'm happy. This past summer I brought them in for a check-up and they did some alignment tests and checked the liners and footbeds and didn't try to sell me anything new and charged me nothiing. I was impressed.
post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryptica
Staff was superb and patient and spent at least 2 1/2 hours with me, haviing me try on every single woman's boot they had to find the best fit.
It's great that you were so pleased with the work that they did! Customer service is key.

However, allow me to contrast this to my experience with Jeff Bergeron and my wife's experience with Bob Gleason. In both cases, we walked in, were immediately asked to remove shoes and socks, the experts looked at our feet, asked some questions about our skiing, and in both cases said something effectively the following: "There are three boots that will fit you in the performance range you require." We tried on the ones that would fit, picked the best fit, and then had them customized. In Terry's case, she went back once later in the week for a tweak, but has worn them since (including pulling them out of mothballs this year) with no changes. In my case, I haven't been back to see Jeff.

To me, the difference in the experiences is a result of expertise. I am grateful that Jeff could narrow my choices so quickly so that I didn't have to spend too much time trying boots on. As with most things, YMMV.
post #30 of 42

The best bootfitters in the Country....

The staff of Masterfit University: http://www.masterfituniversity.com/staff.htm

You might have a good shop nearby, with great customer service. But these guys are the best. Period. The do the US Ski team, Olympics, etc.
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