EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Admit it, you have carved on a rock, and liked it...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Admit it, you have carved on a rock, and liked it...

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
All it takes is a little more effort, and you can carve a rock just like snow. Its ok to admit you did it, you are a better person for it. The alternative is eating snow hard. The is something deeply satisfying about carving a root or even moreso a rock.

Alfonse
post #2 of 24
Rocks are sweeeeeeeeeeeeet. I had four core shots last week and filled the black bases with clear p-tex. It looks cool.
post #3 of 24
I usually try really, really hard to skid my turns when skiing rocks.

Sometimes I'll skarve, but mostly I skid.

Bob
post #4 of 24
Yes indeedy! Little in life compares to that resounding KA-CHUNK sound, when you know you've just eliminated 10% of your base, and one edge.

However, the thrill is substantially enhanced if you just purchased the skis, with bindings freshly mounted, and you core them on the maiden run.

Even better; You borrow your friend's favorite new skis, which he reluctantly lets you try because you flatter his ski choice, his skiing skill, and you have the same boot sole length. Then, you shred the innards his new babies on granite.

However, nothing approaches the supreme triumph: Borrowing your bosses skis for a day, inflicting multiple core shots, and returning them with a warm, appreciative smile.

Skiing is a sublime sport with many levels of enjoyment.
post #5 of 24
I absolutely destroyed the bases of my PRs last weekend at MRG. It was sensational...no joke. I actually enjoy seeing the look of horror on the guy's face at my local shop when I bring in my banged-up boards at the end of the season.

One of my best weekends ever was at W/B in June 2001 for closing weekend. There is a great set of rock ledges off of the harmony chair, and in June, there was a constant trickle of water over the rocks from the melt. I spent a few hours just launching off of those wet rocks...the changing sound of your skis going from snow to rock to air and back to snow is incredible.
post #6 of 24
I have always considered the pattern of a core shot and other base gouges to tell the story of how well a person skis. I always liked to yell at my son about having so much base damage (not that it did any good). However, I remember when I started to notice (a number of years ago) that the damage was running along the length of the ski when I still thought he couldn't keep up with me. The hard cold evidence made me realize that he was indeed passing me by. The only reconciliation from this is that as time has gone by a higher percentage of my gouges and core shots run along the length of the ski as opposed to across it.

Personally, I think this discussion belongs in the instructional section. Let's just throw out movement analysis and start talking about patterns of base damage. I think it would be, at the very least, as accurate an indicator of someone's skiing level and would be open to much less debate!
post #7 of 24
My favorite core shot is the one in my public enemies where an exposed screw in the top of a box cartwheeled me off the end and i yard saled in front of my entire freestyle clinic. Its runs about about half the width of the ski, getting progressively deeper and then stopping abruptly at the edge, which came away from the incident with nothing but a ding. Hooray for poor parks maintenance!
post #8 of 24
carving rock takes a sharper edge than i had yesterday...
last run at magic on red line i skidded across a big smooth rock and hard-landed my hip...needed a long breather after that. had such a blast there though (first time) i was smiling all morning today, with a prominent gimp in my gait. i couldn't even notice how sore the legs musta felt! a little pain just makes me want to ski that rock again!
post #9 of 24
2 years ago, first day on brand new bandits, really bent out an edge at Sunshine (Goats Eye?). A shop in Banff was able to save it at a very reasonable price, but the edge ripped out early this year in VT. Within two or three weeks of buying identical replacements, really bent out another edge on the Mall at Sugarbush.

I'm sure these have been posted many times:

http://www.telemarktips.com/BaseRepair.html
http://www.tognar.com/repairstips.html
post #10 of 24
If you're carving rocks, that just tells me one thing: you're not good enough to avoid them.
post #11 of 24
I'm adding all of you to the People I will never buy used skis from.
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Dunn
If you're carving rocks, that just tells me one thing: you're not good enough to avoid them.
Ahem... Maybe I'm wrong here, but aren't mountains made of rock? If so, avoiding rocks means staying home.
post #13 of 24
A number of years ago on my first day on my new Dyn Speed SFs, I was at Mt Snow in December for a PSIA event. I launched off a little roll in the hill and landed squarely on a flat slab of granite in the middle of the trail. I ended up with a cracked sidewall directly underfoot but no obvious base damage other than a slightly depressed edge and base.

Then, two years ago, first day on my SC10s, same event in December, but at Killington, we went up the first lift, then on the transfer to the second lift, I took a wicked core shot from a hidden rock in the middle of the trail. I ended up p-texing it every night that week because it wouldn't hold the p-tex. When I got back home, I put in a 1/2"x4" base weld, which is still there to this day.
post #14 of 24
riverside air

Rocks at MRG are smooth polished. I hit more rocks on the last trip than all the other rocks combind. The result - very little damage. So many people over ther years have taken the nastyness out of the rock!

I do enjoy seeing sparks from time to time. It's usually better on someone else's ski!
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Dunn
If you're carving rocks, that just tells me one thing: you're not good enough to avoid them.
It tells me you've never wanted to ski a line bad enough where there's a risk of hitting rocks. Rock bands exist and the risk associated with 2 feet of snow covering them needs to be weighed. Sometimes the fresh snow is deep enough... sometimes it's not. It's the not the stuff I see I'm worried about.
post #16 of 24

someone elses sparks -- like mine

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
riverside air

Rocks at MRG are smooth polished. I hit more rocks on the last trip than all the other rocks combind. The result - very little damage. So many people over ther years have taken the nastyness out of the rock!

I do enjoy seeing sparks from time to time. It's usually better on someone else's ski!
Alfonse usualy giggles like a schoolgirl when talking about MY sparks.
Unfortunately (flame bait alert!), Paradise has too much nmad snow on it these days for a good "light show". No worrys, Al, spring is coming!
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinn
It tells me you've never wanted to ski a line bad enough where there's a risk of hitting rocks. Rock bands exist and the risk associated with 2 feet of snow covering them needs to be weighed. Sometimes the fresh snow is deep enough... sometimes it's not. It's the not the stuff I see I'm worried about.
I don't think the rocks these guys are talking about are on the lines that you're talking about.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Si
on belongs in the instructional section. Let's just throw out movement analysis and start talking about patterns of base damage. I think it would be, at the very least, as accurate an indicator of someone's skiing level and would be open to much less debate!
What do you say to base damage behind the toepiece only?
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Dunn
I don't think the rocks these guys are talking about are on the lines that you're talking about.
I'm sure geologically, you're correct, Harry. Some mountain ranges are more or less likely to feature pronounced "rock bands." Other features such as hidden scree fields, hidden ledges, etc. with poorly bonded snow present a silimar challenge, and resultant adrenaline shot. If there's some other pithy connotation here, the rest of us aren't sophisticated enough to catch it.

If you're not prepared to ski whatever conditions may be present, perhaps you need to stay where things are patrolled, insured, marked & "safe". Otherwise, there may be challenges that come upon you that the skier alone needs to deal with. Depending on where you ski, this may mean ice, rock, death cookies, hidden deadfall, and tree boughs don't brush out of the way as you punch through them.

Wherever your line is, one that results in a bloody lip, bruised arm, core shot and a secret pow stash with only one set of tracks on it is a joy. Sparks optional.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
Maybe Okemo or Stratton will buy magic mountain and remove all of the rock bands and interesting terrain features that make people so uncomfortable when they look down at them from the chair. Its not fair that people have to look at such horrific terrain features from the chairlift. I bet Stratton does not have a single rock on the entire mountain. In fact I believe the rash of unwarranted lawsuits began at Stratton many years ago when some gaper skied a closed trail and sued them for it. They probably put razorwire up when a trail is closed now, but at least we get to pay 70+ a ticket Maybe next year I will buy into the Stratton Club so I can cut lines and ski 20,000 vertical feet of vert before lunch. Its only like 60k a year right?

Or maybe I will carve those rocks with joy and ski fresh Pow with no crowds and look over at Strattons wide Groomed Boulevards that cost twice as much to ski and laugh.

Alfonse
post #21 of 24
One of my ski companions refers to rock carving as "Sharpening 101"

He frequently amuses me by mentioning this phrase very loudly to me, within earshot of the snowboarded who just took the Sharpening 101 course (and usually landed on their butt)
post #22 of 24
Skied a strong 2 days at MRG a couple of weeks ago in the big powder dump, still managed to really beat up the bases which I tought I did really well. Long rips down the lenght of the skis, really burred the edges hard, in on spot at least a 1/16 - 1/8 of metal edge was ground down. Took them to my local tune shop hoping they would tell me it was beyond repair ( I try to really make them work while tuning), but they did a great job, the things look brand new. I gues I have to ski them harder so they will snap or blow out the edge before the shop will turn them away. High friction zones make skiing fun & interesting!
post #23 of 24
Yo bowler - wax the gashes and keep filing!
post #24 of 24

Smooth Rocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul jones
riverside air

Rocks at MRG are smooth polished. I hit more rocks on the last trip than all the other rocks combind. The result - very little damage. So many people over ther years have taken the nastyness out of the rock!

I do enjoy seeing sparks from time to time. It's usually better on someone else's ski!
Paul - good point. Between the rocks, moss and wet leaves, snow sometimes isn't even necessary to make it down Stark Mountain.

Alfonse - I can confirm for a fact that Stratton is one big rockless meadow.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Admit it, you have carved on a rock, and liked it...