EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › What to improve? (video critique)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What to improve? (video critique)

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Well I've done it! After looking arround here for several months I've finally registered. I've just returned from my ski vacation in Switserland and wondered what I could have done better in this video. This chute was some 45 degrees steep on the top with hard but grippy snow. Go ahead take me appart

video (windows media 5 Mb)
post #2 of 19
There is nothing wrong with the technique, IMO, but there is room to make rounder turns. Also, be careful of making too many turns in the middle, the slough can sometimes wipe you out (but you probably know that already!). In any event, try having some fun with the terrain, instead of just hopping down the middle. And next time, don't edit the video!
post #3 of 19
Looks like you had some fun. There's nothing to take apart here. You skied the chute and skied it well. If you get a shot at more 45 deg stuff and you want to work on something, try going at it with a little less slip, though I probably don't need to tell you that. In the case of this chute that might be a little easier where the chute appears to open up a bit at the end. In the narrow part of the chute you were probably right to use slip because there is not much space to run it out across if you need to.
post #4 of 19
Very Good high end skiing but I'll pick some nits that seperate you from the big boys!

Stand up, you were breaking at the waist on every turn especially on the right ones. Part of the reason is that you are constantly compressed to the bottom in your legs. You never get long again and therefore you run out of room to flex and absorb at the end of the turn and therefore you boink at the waist. To help this make your pole plant directly down hill from and away from your boots as opposed to up near the ski tips. This is a very important skill that people need to use but don't on steeps. Really exagerate this when you first strat trying it. This will get your body moving down the hill and get your legs long again at the start of the turn. This takes a lot of commitment and on a slope with that pitch you'll really feel weight less as you go over but it feels great when those skis arc back under you.

Your run is really a series of controlled skids. You are losing all the energy at the end of every turn and scrubbing instead of re-directing it into the next turn. Try and get more of a flow going.

It comes down to that age old question: Are you a pencil or an eraser?
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidecut
Stand up, you were breaking at the waist on every turn especially on the right ones. Part of the reason is that you are constantly compressed to the bottom in your legs. You never get long again and therefore you run out of room to flex and absorb at the end of the turn and therefore you boink at the waist.
Thanks for pointing that out. I guess this low stance also makes it harder on the legs. I'm struggling to ski a longer chute in one go. My legs explode halfway down.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MilesB
There is nothing wrong with the technique, IMO, but there is room to make rounder turns.
Thanks. I'm able to make round turns untill I feel I have to make jumpturns. I can't seem to combine the two. Any tips on achieving this?
post #7 of 19
Im gonna comment on your video as I always do, without looking at previous replies...

Taking in consideration that you come from a completely flat country your skiing in this 45 deg. chute is impressive. Jokes aside, you seem to have the situation in controll. You have a good rhythm and you look confident. Its steep and snow is not all that grate eather. However, I think you should stay in the fall line for a fraction of a second longer. Now you seem to rush across the fall line and skidd your way down sideways. Espesially your left hand turn. To jump your turn in conditions like this is ok but you should only initiate the turn with a little jump and then stay longer in the fall line. After crossing the fall line you should try to make the turns a little rounder. Also your left hand is brought forward too early and this has to do with the way you execute your left hand turn as mentioned above. Hips are rotated outwards and you loose edgehold and skidd. Maybe its result of your wide powder skis. If there was 30cm switz medium heavy powder your technique would not work like its on the video but then you would probably just adjust your style a little. Other than that, great skiing and great filming. Subtitles would also come in handy....
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fianke
Thanks. I'm able to make round turns untill I feel I have to make jumpturns. I can't seem to combine the two. Any tips on achieving this?
One technique Im fond of at the moment is what is called "the counter-turn". This works well on steep terrain and espesially well on moguls. Drive your knees towards the hill and jack your edges uphill shortly just before the turn. Use antisipated pole plants and try to keep your body facing downhill. Dont rotate your hipps. I have been trying to teach students this for some time now and it seems to be very very hard. The combination of doing something strong and lightning fast and very smooth and relaxed in one motion seems to be the key to high end skiing and sports in general.
post #9 of 19
There is an article by Eric Deslauries (Eski) somewhere on the net that goes into detail about combining a hop with a rounded turn. Can someone post a link?

I may get a lot of crap for this, but it is feasible to ski that chute in that condition without any hopping (except maybe the first 1-2 turns) and with engagement of the edge well before the fall line. For me the 2 most important cues are aggressive flexing of the downhill ski at initiation while simultaneously pulling it backwards. Take just a *little* bit extra time to let the top of the turn develop. Best to give this a little practice on something without so much exposure. Using the terrain features of the chute, such as skiing up on the sides allows for easier speed control. However, you will be going a little faster than in the video. You can do hop turns in one direction and round turns in the other, if you want or need to (especially if you have one side that's noticeable stronger), I do this on occasion. However, I do pretty crappy hop turns, so I try to use them as little as possible!
post #10 of 19
Looks like a lot of fun! Is this in Andersmatt?

Good high level skiing.: You seemed to get more comfortable toward the end of the tape while the pitch remained constant. In my experience, the first few turns at the steepness are of course the most difficult. We all need to get a feel for the snow and the pitch.

Try to look a little further down the hill. You seemed to be focused on your skis and that may have contributed to your breaking at the waist.

Your skis will come around in more of an arc if your movements are directed down the hill. Project you CM down the pitch by extending your legs at the finitiation. Your pole swing should be down the fall line.

In the tighter spaces and early turns, your right pole swing was toward the tips which delays edge release and elongates the turn. Your left pole touch was next to your boots leaving you fairly compact.

If you have the good fortune to get another shot at this type of terrain you might want to experiment with retraction-extension turns. You are a very strong skier and I think you will enjoy that movement pattern.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fianke
Thanks. I'm able to make round turns untill I feel I have to make jumpturns. I can't seem to combine the two. Any tips on achieving this?
Here's something to try. Start with a traverse. Lift the tail of the uphill ski and press the tip of the ski into the snow hard to bend the ski. Do it until you can hold this all the way across the traverse in both directions. Repeat with the downhill ski. Next continue holding the downhill ski tip pressed hard down from the traverse into the next turn. Repeat for the other direction. Finally, do a leaper turn. At the end of one turn, leap into the air while your skis are still on their uphill edges and turn while you are in the air and land on your new uphill edges. Land on both ski tips first and bend them like you were during the traverses.
post #12 of 19
Looks like a nice run and you skied it fluidly!

Maybe extend legs out toward the sides more and start shaping the turn a bit earlier in the fall line.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman
you skied it fluidly!
Hey listen the guy made a good run on a steep pitch but the one thing he did not do was ski it fluidly.
post #14 of 19
I would have gone bigger and faster with the turns. With more snow, you might have been caught up with the runoff...not necessarily a good thing. Try banking from side to side and use about 8-10 turns next time. If you got fat skis, use 'em proper and don't be too timid.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jersey Tom
If you got fat skis, use 'em proper and don't be too timid.
After seeing the footage of some of my runs I thought the same. I had the feeling I already went a lot faster then last year. It didn´t look that way on video though. :
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by shortturns
Looks like a lot of fun! Is this in Andersmatt?
Nope, this is the ´Aletschgebiet´ near the famous Aletsch glacier. It more like a family ski area but if you look for it there are some nice off piste runs there.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fianke
After seeing the footage of some of my runs I thought the same. I had the feeling I already went a lot faster then last year. It didn´t look that way on video though. :
Sol goode.

If you don't, try doing the same run or similar runs with someone that will open it up. My buddy I was with in JH last week definitely pushed me being the stronger skier that he is, and it def paid off.

Not bad though, but obviously could have been better skied.....
As is the case most of the time for us anyways.
I give it 7/10.
post #18 of 19
I am not an instructor so for what it is worth. You were smooth and under control, good job. I agree with the bending forward at the waist(I do this also). As far as linking turns in the steps a tip from Scot Schmidt is to do an early weight transfer to the uphill ski, push off with the the uphill foot and roll your down hill knee into the turn. Seems to help me.

Looked like a great chute with good snow
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jersey Tom
If you don't, try doing the same run or similar runs with someone that will open it up.
That´s the problem, I´m only able to ski stuff like this for 1-2 weeks a year. The people I ski with are less good skiers then I am. I can help them getting on a new level but not the other way around. That´s why I booked trip with a guide in Chamonix this April. We will be skiing couloirs for 5 days. I´m sure he will be able to help me improve. I´m looking forward to that.

One thing I found out is that after skiing chutes like this you become much more confident on less steep slopes. So I guess I just have to ski some 55+ chutes...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › What to improve? (video critique)