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metron hype not justified - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Joe;

For WNY, give the M9 or M10 a try. Or maybe even the M11.

I've skied the M9 4 or 5 times and found them to be great for our conditions. I skied them at Holimont at the end of January and was very impressed, then went onto the Volkl 6*. I'd take the M9 any day.

I admit that I'd like to try the M10 as I am 5'11" and 220.

I did try the B5 twice and although I think it is an amazing ski, I think the M11 would be more than enough for me.

In general, I think weight is going be increasing across the board, in order to provide torsional stiffness. Let's see how much the other guy's Metrons end up weighing next year.
post #32 of 53
A little off topic, but most of the posters here know the Metrons really well.

I'm still on factory edges on my M:EX's (my quads still haven't fully recovered) - and I'm wondering if you guys (Strato?) know what the factory bevel is. I've probably got about 2 or 3 days before I throw them on the clamps, but I'd love to keep them tuned at the same angle that Atomic issues them. Any thoughts?
post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stratify
A little off topic, but most of the posters here know the Metrons really well.

I'm still on factory edges on my M:EX's (my quads still haven't fully recovered) - and I'm wondering if you guys (Strato?) know what the factory bevel is. I've probably got about 2 or 3 days before I throw them on the clamps, but I'd love to keep them tuned at the same angle that Atomic issues them. Any thoughts?
1 deg base and 3 deg side.
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato
Joe: Couldn't you just throw a bunch of short-swing turns in the narrow corridors?

If find the B:5's wiggle quite well down narrow chutes, so long as I'm not trying to nail the zipper line in bumps (that, they're NOT designed for).

Of course, our western conditions are different from yours. On harder slopes, I agree that the SX10 is a better choice.

I believe that western skiers benefit more from the Metron geometry and versatility. We usually contend with more snow, in all its varieties (crud, slop, crust, powder, hardpack, etc.). As Betaracer indicated, this is where the Metrons shine brightest.
You are probably right on all counts, Capt. The times I've skied the B5's were hardpack days. Short-swinging the B5 took a lot of work 'cause they want to carve, carve, carve. Once locked onto an edge, man, did they need convincing to break out. Ice/hardpack tight moguls were a bear, to say the least. I did not find humor the few time when I found myself carving back up the hill in ice moguls, thank you very much.

I can imagine that the metron geometry is much more enjoyable in crud and slop than ice. Sorry to hear that you have little of either this year. I grew up there in PNW myself, and I can't imagine a snowless winter.
post #35 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
1 deg base and 3 deg side.
Thanks Flexon - I've been tuning my old 9.20's to either 1 / 3 or 1.5 / 3. I just wanted to make sure that those angles weren't too extreme for a mid-fat board. Thanks for the info.
post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by josseph
Sorry to hear that you have little of either this year. I grew up there in PNW myself, and I can't imagine a snowless winter.
Yes, Joe, it was a catastrophic year. It's time to focus on kayaking and bike trips. Next year, I'm considering a pass at Sun Peaks. Anything's got to be better than this.

I hear your points regarding the B:5's on ice. While they have good edge hold, they'll never provide the full-range hard-snow performance of a dedicated eastern ski.

Stratify: I believe M:EX factory bevel is exactly as quoted by Phil: 1 deg base and 3 deg side. The M:EX, now there's a full-blown, big-mountain western ski.
post #37 of 53

Hey Phil?????

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
1 deg base and 3 deg side.
If you do 1 degree on the base and 3 degrees on the side, aren't you really just getting 2 degrees on the side?

Hmmmmmmmm?
post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomic_918
Anyone who things the Metron hype is a load of crap will only have to go to their favorite shop next season to see ALL of the Metron-like skis coming out for 2006. Rossi's, Volkl's, Nordica's, etc. Write down the Metron dimensions and compare.

My next question is what will the NEXT new thing be say...for 2007? The Atomic Izor line promises to cause quite a stirr next season. Nano-technology applied to ski construction. Any copy cats?????
First of all wide shapes do not perform in all conditions, especially out east. The Metron did not sell well, the B5 is overpriced, and are not long enough.
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomic_918
If you do 1 degree on the base and 3 degrees on the side, aren't you really just getting 2 degrees on the side?

Hmmmmmmmm?
That's the idea - it's basically an 88 degree edge offset by one degree. These are bevels that were absolutely unheard of 10 years ago ... now that's how the factory cranks 'em out.
post #40 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sars
First of all wide shapes do not perform in all conditions, especially out east.
Sars;

I ski in western New York. The Metrons work great for me here.
post #41 of 53
Yeah, nothing comes near my Snowrider Mach 1 SL.
All skis build at VR feature an excellent quality. I preferred the Snowrider over Fischer Worldcup SL in 166 and over Fischer Worldcup SC in 160 when searching for a high quality slalom ski. Those skis just go through everything, top stability.

The Metron model referred to is the B5 if you haven't got it by now. = Snowrider Mach 1 or Snowrider.
Prices are around 365 Euros for the Titanium version, ski only. I believe they will ship to the states as well. Just write them several e-mails or ring them up. Not sure if they can speak english at spezialski.de (former eastern germany "ddr"). At snowrider they certainly do speak english, but I wouldn't count on them shipping to the States.

The skis I tested had about 100 days on them, and they still outperformed 10 days old Fischer Worldcup SL (I do speak here about the race stock). I do not know about performance in the gates as I do not race (I did a lot of GS and SL snowboardracing though) but I know for certain that some people in Europcup use them as well as several people in the FIS.

Just another top notch producing skis at VR -- "Indigo"
post #42 of 53

What are the weights on the M9 164 without bindings?

My M10 164s w/ 412 Neox weigh in at 8 pounds! I skied them for the first time last weekend and they are really almost too big and heavy. They hold like on tracks going through groomers and heavy crud alike; but they are difficlt for me to handle otherwise.

Before I go to go down a notch in performance I'd like to lighten them up with the new bindings. Are the new 412 bindings really one pound lighter? And if I went down to an M9, how much lighter are they? Anyone got M9 164s with "new" 06 lighter bindings that could weight them for me?
post #43 of 53
I haven't skied the M9's. But I do have the '06 B:5's, and the 1 lb per ski lighter bindings makes a noticable difference (at least when lifting the skis). The '06 Neox's would reduce your M:10 weight by 2 lbs.

As I mentioned before, I never noticed the weight on the hill. But, you ski in the east on harder snow. Out there, I can see the weight being more of an issue.
post #44 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato
The '06 Neox's would reduce your M:10 weight by 2 lbs.
My local dealer called Atomic and they told them the new Neox was 1.15 pounds lighter per pair.

I only notice the weight when I throw the skis up on my shoulder. When I ski I don't notice the extra weight (162 B5).
post #45 of 53
Max: I stand corrected. Thought it was per piece (they definitely feel lighter). Agreed: on-hill, not an issue.
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sars
First of all wide shapes do not perform in all conditions, especially out east. The Metron did not sell well, the B5 is overpriced, and are not long enough.
Oh? Last I heard it was sold out in the US. And folks I know in the east have really liked them.
post #47 of 53
As a relative newbie on this board (Jan. 05), I don't believe any topic has generated as much discussion during my time - in a variety of guises - as the Atomic Metron series.

Regardless of how one feels about the Metron designs, it's safe to say that they've had an impact.

Bears represent what's known in marketing circles as "early adopters" or "opinion leaders". We're the gung-ho segment.

Persumably, what we feel trickles down to the broader masses and influences their buying habits and dealer choices (so the theory goes).

As a result, regardless of what any of us personally feels about Metrons, they've created a buzz that will likely reverberate throughout the industry.

As others have stated, this is the beginning. Expect a plethora of Metron-esque skis on the shelves and on the slopes next year, and the year after.

Marketing texts call it a "Paradigm Shift" (previous ones: shape skis, fat skis, mid-fats, integrated binding systems). We're now into the "next thing" in skiing.

Undoubtedly, we'll soon find a new horse to ride. After all, we have a reputation to uphold!
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sars
The Metron really does not skis so well in comparison to others out there. You can find much better.
Do tell. I've been on more than 30 different skis in the past two years, and beg to differ. However, I'm open to hearing which ones are so much better.
post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by josseph
On the negative side, I find them cantankerous. They don't like last minute input to alter their "predistined" course. Skiing a narrow corridor took heroic levels of effort to convince them not to carve. I found them not very versatile.
I found that the more I skied them this seemed to fade away. However, I think I know what you mean. Now, though, I find that I can do pretty much anything on them, including narrow, steep trails through trees, without concern.
post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sars
The Metron did not sell well.
You're kidding, right? I spent almost a month trying to find B:5's at ANY price in the PNW. Sold-out of B:5's and M:11's in every shop in Oregon and Washington, and WE DIDN'T EVEN HAVE ANY SNOW!!!

Also, none available in the BC resorts I skied, including Silver Star and Sun Peaks. All sold-out (and re-ordered 3 times, according to one shopkeeper).

Likewise on ebay. Sold-out! I could only find a few 152's at $800, the highest price I've seen for any ski on that forum.

It appears somebody bought these skis.
post #51 of 53
IMO, the neox weight is only an issue on the heavier B5 series. My XI's w/o the binding is a light ski with a very light swing weight.
post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sars
First of all wide shapes do not perform in all conditions, especially out east. The Metron did not sell well, the B5 is overpriced, and are not long enough.
With most of those statements I really have to guess you haven't actually skied them.

Don't know what size you are but you should try a Metron10 in a 178 if you think they aren't long enough. That is a good chunk of ski.
post #53 of 53
L7, the b5 in a 172 is a chuck of ski, too!
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