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Ski to Complement RX8 in Eastern Quiver

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
First up, thanks to all who post regularly on this forum, it's a great source of information. I took the plunge and got a RX8 in 165 from dawgcatcher (without demoing, yikes!) back in early February, and have absolutely loved it, especially on hard snow (which is probably our conditions here in central New York between December and February about 75% of the time). The ski makes me feel like superman after coming off my Atomic SX7s . My girlfriend also went the demo route based on a lot of advice that I've read here, and ended up getting a great deal on a 2003-2004 Volkl 6 Star, and thinks its the best ski she's ever been on (other than maybe Head i-SL Chips which weren't made short enough for her anyway)...

Anyway, I got a chance to take the RX8 out in spring chop at Stratton this Monday, and then in up to 6 inches of powder on top of ice the following day. The skis were able to get through everything fine, but they required a good bit of work. I'm 5' 10" and about 190 pounds (yeah, I know I could have gone with a 170 in the RX8, but I prefer the short turning radius), and at this point primarily ski between blue and black groomers (and I have no problem with double black steepness if it isn't bumped up). I am interested in getting more into bump and tree skiing next year, and wouldn't mind having an additional ski for those moderate powder days that aren't all that uncommon living up in the lake effect snow belt in New York.

Since end of season is such a great time to buy, I was curious if anyone had some input? I know the Volkl 724 Pros are going to be discontinued for next year, but is the AC4 a huge step up from this ski? Also, any preferences/ideas on Dynastar Legend 8000s, Rossi B2s, or Elan M666s? I figure I might as well not get anything with a waist less than 75 mm since I already have the RX8 for hard snow carving days.

Thanks a bunch!

-Craig
post #2 of 17
Craig,

I got the Bigstix 7.6 as a #2 to my Volkl 5*s. You may like the same strategy. These are sweet crud skis compared to other midfats and they are also good at bumps. My review is here: Linkage
post #3 of 17
I may be biased, since this is what I did. But I'd recommend the 8000 to go with the RX 8, as it's worked out well for me.

I think the Dynastar compliments the Fischer well because they have that same lively feel, both have a huge sweet spot, and both have excellent edge hold and quickness compared to other skis in their class. The 8000 will give you a ski you can feel comfortable on regardless of the conditions.

The 666 would be my next recommendation since it's pretty similar to the 8000. If you like the feel of the Fischer skis, I don't think you'll like the dampness of either the B2 or the 724 pro.
post #4 of 17
I would go with something like the PR or B3 in 175cm. You have a ski that is good for the groomers, so you might as well go WIDE. Then next year get a mid fat.

If you ski well the PR's or B3 well turn easily for you.
post #5 of 17
Something fat....
post #6 of 17
Volant FB's at Sports Authority for 120/pr. You can get a pair for you and your girlfriend.
post #7 of 17
The 175 cm FB are gone at the King of Prussia store I called yesterday to inquire.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by roundturns
The 175 cm FB are gone at the King of Prussia store I called yesterday to inquire.
There were just 4 pair there on Monday, wow.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig W
I am interested in getting more into bump and tree skiing next year, and wouldn't mind having an additional ski for those moderate powder days that aren't all that uncommon living up in the lake effect snow belt in New York.
I picked up the Atomic M:b5 as the complement for my RX8s, and find them to be wonderful overall skis, but they don't go enough to the extreme to be really different.

The question is do you want lively (like the RX8s), energetic but a bit damper, or very soft and damp? I would suggest that the Dynastar 8000 and Fischer Big Stix are in the first category, the Elan in the second, and the Rossi, Volant, and Salomon in the third. It's really for you: do you want a ski that feels like the RX8 but is wider or do you want one that's really damp or something in-between.

Frankly, I'd suggest the Elan 666, 777, 888, or 999 as a great compromise ski, depending on how wide you really want to go.
post #10 of 17
You know the range of use on cross skis today is so big-I suspect there's a lot of overlap with midfats (like the B5's and the Legend 8000's-great skis, to be sure)-I say push the versatility envelope and go for a ski that doen't overlap at all with the RX8 (afterall, that's the whole reason to build up 'quiver' as opposed to an everything ski-which is what the b5/8000 are).

I say go with a really fat twin tip (Seth Pistol, Pocket Rocket,karma-gotama, mad trix mojo) I just demoed some of these-I love 'em (I'm looking to buy the mad trix mojo). And they serve a completely different set of needs than your cross skis-they'll get you into the park and pipe-as well as off-piste jumping and jibbing-and when the moguls are soft and you feel more like leaping than carving they can't be beat. Plus-the turned up tails and porky waists make them float and turn in the super soft and grabby (be it powder, slush, crud, chop, or corn-contrary to popular opinion we do get all of these in the east...well, not so much corn, but the rest of them) in ways the RX8 (or any mid-fat, for that matter) can only dream about.

I think a fat modern twin tip (and their all very good-look for bargains) paired with a great cross ski covers about every condition (and really well at that) you'll encounter east or west.
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Everyone,

Thanks for the input so far. I guess just to reset things a little bit, I definitely am more interested in a lively, energetic ski. I guess something that had a similar feel to the RX8s, but that was designed to be used optimally in different conditions would fit the bill. The input on the Fischer BigStix and the Legend 8000s is greatly appreciated so far, and I did wonder if the B2 would be too soft compared to what I'm enjoying at this point.

The ideas about getting a fat ski are an interesting one. I may try to make it out west next year, but this would probably be at most a once a year thing for me, at least for the next few years (I already push my graduate student lifestyle as far as it can go ). Seeing more than 6 inches of powder at my local ski places is not a very common occurrence, and do fat skis really excel that much at crud and chop?

Also, someone mentioned that Volkl 724s are relatively damp skis? That comes as a bit of a surprise to me I guess, considering the nature of their supersport series.

Anyway, thanks for all the input so far, and any more that you may have. I started this thread just out of curiousity to see what people thought (so I could keep my eyes open for bargains over the next few weeks and months). I may have to try to do a little bit of spring demoing if I get a chance over the next month or so before things wind down...
post #12 of 17
I used to strictly ski Eastern bumps and trees....do NOT get the Volant FB's...or anything else with a 90+mm waist....keep the waist in the high 70's to low 80's at most...and try to keep it light and fun!! Maybe the Pocket Rockets because they're real light and easy (so I hear)...that's about it for the real wide guys.

You just flat out don't have the steepness or the openness of those "off-piste" runs in the East to warrant making huge 40mph powder turns...the Dynastars, Fishers and Elans all sound like a great compliment for one to venture into those tight East Coast trees in some fresh and get some float but still have the quickness you need....

Some of the lighter/softer, wide twin-tips might be ok....just don't even think about the FB's, Gotamas or Seth Pistols...
post #13 of 17
Craig,

Yes, fat skis really excel in crud, slush, powder (as opposed to mids and cross skis).

Reading your last post has me wondering-why do you want another ski anyway? From what you describe you already have the right tool (the 8000 and the B5 will add little me thinks) to enjoy where you ski. More importantly, use the money you would have spent on new skis and go skiing out west (I'd wait for spring conditions to prevail at Tahoe or Mammoth, though as snowfall has sort of stopped their). The rx8 can handle an awful lot of west conditions-and if it gets real soft or deep you can hit a shop and demo a pair of wide planks for 35$.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Liam,

I guess you could say I was just trying to get an opinion on if what I was looking for even made sense (and the jury still seems out on that). I kind of figure I probably will ski on average about 25 to 30 days a year (I think I'm going to ultimately hit the low 20s by the end of the season), and if I could get a really good deal on something to make those 5 to 10 days that are more cruddy that much more enjoyable, why not... Plus, the RX8s don't have the float I'd like them to in the few forays into glades that I've had (especially with the 165 length that I decided to go with for hard snow performance).

Don't get me wrong, the RX8s can handle the stuff just fine, I just found it to be a lot more work, and something that could be pretty exhuasting for me if I had to take on those conditions for a few days in a row. I do understand people's point about just demoing things when needed, I guess it's just a little bit of my gear whore side coming out .

Also, it's easier to sneak to Vermont for a day or two when I can, then taking the longer amount of time off I'd need to get out west.
post #15 of 17
I would go with something at least 76mm in the waist, and probably more of a GS feel. Maybe a ski that likes to run a bit more-something with a greater than 16m turn radius. It will be a nice compliment to the narrower, more slalom-like RX8. I would check out the following: Elan 666 Fusion, Dynastar Legend 8000, Head Chip 75 or 77, Stockli Stormrider AT, Rossi B2. All are capable skis, with the Elan/Head/Stocki being the more powerful (Fischer-like) skis, and the Dynastar and Rossi being a bit more smooth feeling. If it were me, I would get something as close to an "all-mountain GS" as I could find as a compliment-my choice would be the Elan 666 Fusion, or maybe the new AMC 79 from Fischer. After skiing the RX8, I would want a ski to really get out and run.
post #16 of 17
Get the Dynastar Legend 4800, mid fat all montain, holds edge well, awsome crud buster, skis through slop at the end of the day like its piste. Get it at 165 for quick short radius turn and fun. Fun in 6 inch powder and easy in bumps. My ability level goes up when I use my 4800s.

I was actually considering the rx8 as my early morning carver, also was looking at the volkl p60 and the Rossignol 9s Oversized..
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig W
First up, thanks to all who post regularly on this forum, it's a great source of information. I took the plunge and got a RX8 in 165 from dawgcatcher (without demoing, yikes!) back in early February, and have absolutely loved it, especially on hard snow...
-Craig
Glad you like yor Fischer RX-8's. But his name here at Epic Ski is uh, "dawgcatching" not "dogcatcher"...
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