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What should my 53 year old father get for skis?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,
My name is Kevin and I'm a *gasp* snowboarder. My father and I have been skiing/snowboarding for about 5-6 years now, and I have had my own gear for quite some time. However, he has always rented and is just now deciding to get some equipment of his own. He is 53, so he doesn't want anything too extreme or fast. Since I'm a boarder, I don't know much about ski gear. I'm assuming that skis work the same as snowboards: stiff = good high speed stability but harder to manuver and less forgiving, soft = more forgiving but not as suited for high speeds, am I right?

He is about 5'10 and 165 lbs, and he has pretty much decided that 160 is his size. Does this sound about right?

Here is the criteria for the ski setup:

The budget is set at about $500 for skis, boots, poles, and bindings.
The main purpose is to have control, not speed or performance.
They need to be durable and last.

What skis, boots, poles, and bindings would you recommend to look at? Like I said, control is his #1 priority, he is old and doesn't want to go too fast or too extreme. He doesn't do jumps or cliffs or anything. He mainly skis the blues and blacks.

Oh, and we are open to used or last year's equipment, but new stuff would be ideal. We are also open to buying online, so please provide links! The only thing not online are the boots, those need to be tried on.

Lastly, are all boots/bindings/boards compatible with each other, or can the brands not cross?

Thanks!
post #2 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevRC4130
Hi everyone,

What skis, boots, poles, and bindings would you recommend to look at? Like I said, control is his #1 priority, he is old and doesn't want to go too fast or too extreme. He doesn't do jumps or cliffs or anything. He mainly skis the blues and blacks.
You must have been a handful bringing up to make your dad old before his time .
IMHO, 165 sounds a little short for 5'10", but if he's not into speed it should be O.K. with it. Get the 165 cm. The advantage of a shorter ski is that it is a little easier to correct for mistakes on, and to "muscle" around with improper technique.

Poles: Get some at a yard sale for next to nothing. Make sure they have a basket that will prevent them from sinking into soft snow and nice sharp picks on them for ice. I prefer the strapless poles with the formed grip, but they stopped making them supposedly because of shoulder injuries. They should come to his elbows when the basket is in the snow (turn them upside down and grip below the basket and they reach the flow with the elbow at 90 degrees).

Skis: Don't know much about prices, but if high speeds are off the list, an old 9S Oversize would be good. I think they only came in short lengths too.
post #3 of 20
Kevin, being a 50 year old dad that started skiing last year because my son wanted to here's my advice....

A softer boot works better for me (the lower legs ain't what they used to be) I ski with Rossignol Soft boots. They are mightily expensive but now that its sale time they can be had for $150-200 max.

I LOVE my Atomic C7 skis. They are forgiving, easy to turn and have made me a pretty good skier for someone who never skiied before. I got them on sale with Atomic Device bindings for $325

Add in a good set of poles and you're at what I spent -- $500.

I'm planning to buy new skis now that I'm skiing steeper and less groomed terrain with my son but its a choice not a necessity that I'm doing that. The C7's would be fine for quite a while. Also I ski on shorter skis than whats recommended as a personal preference and it fits how I ski but the new ones will be closer to the so-called "right" length.

Hope this helped.
William
post #4 of 20
The "Dynastar Skis Omecarve 10" is a good value for the price range you are talking about. This is an awesome ski that will make it possible for your Dad to keep up with you and not get as tired.

Here is one on eBay

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...sPageName=WDVW
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidad55
I'm planning to buy new skis now that I'm skiing steeper and less groomed terrain with my son but its a choice not a necessity that I'm doing that. The C7's would be fine for quite a while. Also I ski on shorter skis than whats recommended as a personal preference and it fits how I ski but the new ones will be closer to the so-called "right" length.
Thanks for the help everyone!

About what you said-
One thing I want to make clear is that he actually skis pretty well and has been skiing for about 5-6 years now. He is comfortably skiing blacks and we are looking for skis that aren't beginner skis, they need to be able to handle the more advanced terrain. The catch is that they need to have stability over speed, while still not being beginner skis .

The other thing is, he doesn't really ski "slow", he just doesn't want something that will make him ski fast (read: "out of control").

I hope this cleared things up, I might not have said what I wanted to before.

Thanks!
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
One more thing, with bindings, I have noticed that some are two seperate peices, while others the two peices are connected. Which is better and why?
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevRC4130
Hi everyone,
My name is Kevin and I'm a *gasp* snowboarder. My father and I have been skiing/snowboarding for about 5-6 years now, and I have had my own gear for quite some time. However, he has always rented and is just now deciding to get some equipment of his own. He is 53, so he doesn't want anything too extreme or fast. Since I'm a boarder, I don't know much about ski gear. I'm assuming that skis work the same as snowboards: stiff = good high speed stability but harder to manuver and less forgiving, soft = more forgiving but not as suited for high speeds, am I right?

He is about 5'10 and 165 lbs, and he has pretty much decided that 160 is his size. Does this sound about right?

Here is the criteria for the ski setup:

The budget is set at about $500 for skis, boots, poles, and bindings.
The main purpose is to have control, not speed or performance.
They need to be durable and last.

What skis, boots, poles, and bindings would you recommend to look at? Like I said, control is his #1 priority, he is old and doesn't want to go too fast or too extreme. He doesn't do jumps or cliffs or anything. He mainly skis the blues and blacks.

Oh, and we are open to used or last year's equipment, but new stuff would be ideal. We are also open to buying online, so please provide links! The only thing not online are the boots, those need to be tried on.

Lastly, are all boots/bindings/boards compatible with each other, or can the brands not cross?

Thanks!
Look at K2 Omni5.5. One of the best skis for the money. He could ski at 170 or less...can't remember the exact sizes but I think there is a 167cm. Other manufacturers have similar skis but the 5.5 is a good benchmark ski.

All boots, bindings are compatible. Sounds like you should look at better intermediate equipment. Also, integrated binding/skis are Ok but not necessary. Their main benefit is to allow the ski to bend evenly without a flat spot underfoot to enhance carving on groomed runs.

As for boots, go to a good shop to find what boot fits your dads foot shape. A good rule of thumb is to buy a boot that has a full retail of $350-400. You should be able to find some good deals this time of year. Salomon, Nordica, Tecnica, Rossignol, Lange, Dolomite all good boots but he needs to find what fits his foot.
post #8 of 20
I highly recommend the Volkl Supersport Five Star. this ski will give the performance, and forgiveness you are looking for. An additional advantage in your case is that the bindings are integrated and can be adjusted to any boot size without any hassel. It is easy to slide the bindings on the rail yourself, but you should go to a shop to check the DIN settings and perform a release check.

I know of many people of your dad's age and ability that have used this ski to enjoy the growth that is possible with a high performance ski that is also forgiving. At your dad's size a 161 would be comfortable, and should still be stable at speed. Probably the most common length for advanced/expert would be 168. If you search for reviews on this ski, you will not find many who are not 100% satisfied. These skis are at first glance expensive, but keep in mind they include the price of a very good set of bindings. Current sale prices make this a good deal.
post #9 of 20
Ah, sorry didnt quite grasp that. Anyway I would say that your dad and I are similar in our skills. I'm looking at m9 metrons (I'm partial to atomic as a brand -- for no particular reason...) or just C9's in 170 length. I dont mid skiing fast-ish (that is to say in control and not too far behind zack) and at the same time I dont want to shy away from something steep for lack of equipment.


Quote:
Originally Posted by KevRC4130
Thanks for the help everyone!

About what you said-
One thing I want to make clear is that he actually skis pretty well and has been skiing for about 5-6 years now. He is comfortably skiing blacks and we are looking for skis that aren't beginner skis, they need to be able to handle the more advanced terrain. The catch is that they need to have stability over speed, while still not being beginner skis .

The other thing is, he doesn't really ski "slow", he just doesn't want something that will make him ski fast (read: "out of control").

I hope this cleared things up, I might not have said what I wanted to before.

Thanks!
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevRC4130
He is 53...

he is old
Oh, my! I only have two years left!
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
I highly recommend the Volkl Supersport Five Star. this ski will give the performance, and forgiveness you are looking for. An additional advantage in your case is that the bindings are integrated and can be adjusted to any boot size without any hassel. It is easy to slide the bindings on the rail yourself, but you should go to a shop to check the DIN settings and perform a release check.

I know of many people of your dad's age and ability that have used this ski to enjoy the growth that is possible with a high performance ski that is also forgiving. At your dad's size a 161 would be comfortable, and should still be stable at speed. Probably the most common length for advanced/expert would be 168. If you search for reviews on this ski, you will not find many who are not 100% satisfied. These skis are at first glance expensive, but keep in mind they include the price of a very good set of bindings. Current sale prices make this a good deal.
Agree with your comments on the 5 star. This would be a significantly better ski than the K2 Omni 5.5. A shorter length of 161 or 168 would be appropriate for a non expert.

However, I would not set the bindings yourself. Always have a certified technician do it and test the release values. Saving a few bucks is not worth risking an injury.
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
http://christysports.com/acatalog/On..._00 _283.html

Are these the five stars? If so $750 is too much, he wants to spend about $500 total...

Do they make a step lower, like four stars?

http://christysports.com/acatalog/On... 9_00_287.html How are these? We could probably find some of these in our price range on ebay or something...
post #13 of 20
$750 is the price these sold for mid-season. Lower prices are available, like $599 at Al's Ski barn, which seems to be the best currently out there. 5 Star sold out at many places this year, but can still be found if you call around. I don't think you will find this ski much lower priced. .

There is an impressive deal on next year's Supersport Allstar (6-star replacement) from this Ebay dealer. I bought from Jason in September and is reliable if you want to go top end at the $750 price you were offered the 5 star at. Probably not the ski you are looking for, but like I said, impressive deal there.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevRC4130
http://christysports.com/acatalog/Online_Catalog_Volkl_5_Star_AT_12____BR_____749_00 _283.html

Are these the five stars? If so $750 is too much, he wants to spend about $500 total...

Do they make a step lower, like four stars?

http://christysports.com/acatalog/Online_Catalog_Volkl_724_EXT_Motion_L____BR_____47 9_00_287.html How are these? We could probably find some of these in our price range on ebay or something...
The 724 EXT is an intermediate to advanced mid fat ski. Don't know how they ski but most Volkls ski well. The EXT has a 71mm waist and a foam core.

There is a 4 star and it is also designed for intermediate to advanced skiers. It is narrower at the waist 67mm and has a wood core.

There are lots of deals on 5 stars that are in the closer to $500. The price you saw is a regular season price.
post #15 of 20
Kev, I just turned 54 years YOUNG, had the best feeling day on skiis yesterday, When did 53 become OLD? Oh God I'm over the hill. I bet when you get to 50 you too will be young. It's all a matter of perspective. Great to hear that you and your dad are sliding together.
Happy skiing.

Mark
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help!

We just got home from REI, here's what he got:

Skis: K2 Omni 4.5, 167- $369
http://www.rei.com/online/store/Prod...t =REI_SEARCH

which came with bindings, the Marker IBC 10

Boots:
Solomon Performa 8.0- $219
http://www.rei.com/product/47833785.htm?

Poles:
Scott Axis Series 2- $19
http://www.rei.com/product/47840916.htm?

All of this stuff is supposed to last the rest of his life.

Overall it ended up being about $600 with a $30 fee to set it up. How do you think we did?

Thanks
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
Any oppinions on the setup? He's picking it up tomorrow, it's being setup right now.

One thing to sweeten the deal, the boots have been reduced to only $139 at REI.

Good/bad purchase?
post #18 of 20
Good choices. Glad you did not get the Volkl 5 Star. It's kind of stiff and not all that easy to steer. Boots should be fine.

p.s. I am 53, soon to be 54 and I ski hard, so this setup would be too soft (boots) and too slow (skis) for me, but the important thing is that if he is having fun and the setup is good for him, that's all that is important.
post #19 of 20
As long as the boots fit, I'm sure the rest will be fine. Hopefully, they won't have to last the entire rest of his life.
post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 
Guys, we just went back to REI to pick up the skis (not ready until tomorrow ) and we found that the skis(with bindings) are now only $239, the boots $129, and the poles $12! It ended up being much less than we thought, which rocks. Since I spotted that the skis/boots were cheaper, and I helped him look, he bought me (and a pair for himself) some really awesome REI mittens that were $85, marked down to $59 :
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