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breakthrough on bumps

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Today was truly a breakthrough day. I haven't been skiing bumps very well...ever...and although it may seem like a dumb/ obvious thing to you bump pro's, it was a real eureka! moment for me. Basically, I've been working on black bump runs and had little trouble with absorption while traversing...but was always wary of pointing a little further downhill. Due to this, turning oportunities (although present) were hard to take advantage of (imagine traversing a bump run, and then trying to pivot almost 180 degrees while trying to use the inside foot wherever you want on the run). Well, today, feeling a little ambitious, and with some coaxing from a fellow instructor (LII), i started attacking the fall line a little more and voila....so much easier to engage the new inside foot around the bumps..and tons more turning opportunitied opened themselves up...and pole plants worked now. Anyway, i am elated, lots more work to be done to gain experience/better form/ better fluidity etc etc. but just wanted to share this breakthrough.
post #2 of 9
Congrats!!!! I always thought that skiing bumps well is 86.5% mental. Maybe other might want to call me to the carpet for a more precise number.

Correct me if I am wrong. You are saying that your breakthrough happened when you decided to attack the bumps more aggressively?
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
yup, I was holding back on the fall line (note, I didn't take the zipper line, just a more aggresive one than that which I was being held back on)
post #4 of 9
The main problems I on steep mogul had is this 2 points,
in my opinion of my pass mistakes.

* Shoulder and hip is not sqaure with the fall line.
This cause high delay onto rapid small radius turn but result
into large radius turn.
Whereever there is fear in me,
the shoulders want to point to the slope side
for medium/large radius turn to edge in.
The "attack" mainly make sure ones level 7 small radius turns
are acting(overcoming self-fear) onto the mogul usage.

* The turn initiation need to be before the hump.
It means the lower start "phantom turn" before the bump.

I look though this site and it help me some way to glue some
bad habits back together. Take a look and imagine all the terms
acting on your body on blue moguls.
http://www.mogullogic.com/Terms.html

-Kin.
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kendo
The main problems I on steep mogul had is this 2 points,
in my opinion of my pass mistakes.

* Shoulder and hip is not sqaure with the fall line.
This cause high delay onto rapid small radius turn but result
into large radius turn.
Whereever there is fear in me,
the shoulders want to point to the slope side
for medium/large radius turn to edge in.
The "attack" mainly make sure ones level 7 small radius turns
are acting(overcoming self-fear) onto the mogul usage.

http://www.mogullogic.com/Terms.html[/url]

-Kin.
In a previous thread about stemming somebody noted that excessive counter (anticipation) can make it harder to release your edges particularly your inside edge. This makes sense to me because counter is often cited as a good way to increase angulation and edge grip at the end of the turn. It follows therefore that it is probably not that helpful in making it easy to release your edges for the next turn (especially when feeling defensive). As an engineer I am always skeptical when a solution only has positive conseqences (i.e. no tradeoffs).

Is my thinking correct or should I accept the fairly commonly held view that counter is a panacea.
post #6 of 9
For those of you out there wanting to improve bumps, I highly recommend the mogul logic link posted above. The website has some good material, their video is also very helpful, and their coaching is great also. I've gone to two of their summer camps and two of their adult winter camps over the last 2-3 years and it has been tremendous help for me.
post #7 of 9
" In a previous thread about stemming somebody noted that excessive counter (anticipation) can make it harder to release your edges particularly your inside edge. This makes sense to me because counter is often cited as a good way to increase angulation and edge grip at the end of the turn. It follows therefore that it is probably not that helpful in making it easy to release your edges for the next turn (especially when feeling defensive). As an engineer I am always skeptical when a solution only has positive conseqences (i.e. no tradeoffs).

Is my thinking correct or should I accept the fairly commonly held view that counter is a panacea."


My opinions:
* "Harder" may not be the proper word. I prefer "longer".
That's it takes longer for the skis to come around.
* My understanding of "anticipation" is build up of "twist" in skiier's
torso which will initiate counter stir motions below the waist.
This is the base of rotational movement. Yet, when one face to the
side of the hill, there is no "anticipation". There exist no "build up"
of counter steering from last turn to link the turns.


-Kin.
post #8 of 9
Kendo, welcome to EpicSki! What a great way to jump into a thread and participate, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpowrie
In a previous thread about stemming somebody noted that excessive counter (anticipation) can make it harder to release your edges particularly your inside edge. This makes sense to me because counter is often cited as a good way to increase angulation and edge grip at the end of the turn. It follows therefore that it is probably not that helpful in making it easy to release your edges for the next turn (especially when feeling defensive). As an engineer I am always skeptical when a solution only has positive conseqences (i.e. no tradeoffs).

Is my thinking correct or should I accept the fairly commonly held view that counter is a panacea.
I think that you're right on. Usually, to release the edges, we want to decrease counter, decrease flex (thus reducing angulation), and then release the edges. The one caveat to this is that flexion does allow for more exact fine movements of the feet, so you certainly can flatten your feet/skis from a flexed position. A little bit of counter also tends to free up the hip joint for full motion (unlike too much or too little, which tend to lock you into a position). Excessive counter often means that the downhill hip joint is completely locked and you don't have any freedom of flexion as a result.
post #9 of 9
Well, I think it is important to define what we mean by counter. If we are talking about hip counter that uses up the range of motion in our hip leg joint, then it is neither progressive (continous motion) or efficient. On the otherhand, if we are saying that we are turning our skis with our legs in the hip socket farther across the hill than our upperbody, then we are still talking about counter but we are anchoring this with our hips and upperbody. This is efficient and skis us into a countered position, which is a versatile movement pattern that allows good effective shaping of the turn and allows the blending in of extention and flexion for pressure along with edging to help shape the turns.

I gonna say that we need to be able to ski ourselves into counter to effectively ski bumps and steeps. I will also say that to effectively ski ourselves into counter we need to have good progressive range of motion in our extention and flexion or our ability to steer our legs in the hip socket will be reduced. Progressive counter that developes as a result of the skis turning farther across the hill than our upperbody is good. Later, RicB.
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